BajaNomad

NEW ROAD in the Sierra San Pedro Martir foothills

David K - 3-4-2009 at 05:04 PM

May not be super new... but is yet to show on any maps. It looks to be a graded road that extends beyond the road shown going to and ending at Rancho Nueva York (northeast of San Quintin)...

Continues up to the high country and permits better access to San Isidoro and the trail to Mision San Pedro Martir, in 2 places.

Then continues southeast along the base of the Sierra San Miguel, which is really part of the entire San Pedro Martir range, to meet the road coming up from El Socorro or Los Martires to El Rosarito and El Suerte.

A new cut across road goes to the El Morro mine area, as well.

In a seperate post on the Baja Nomad Baja Hiking and Backpacking forum, I will show the San Isidoro/ Mision San Pedro Martir trail... as viewed from Google Earth satellite

Here is the overall area (Meling Ranch and Observatory road near top):



Here is the new road area... the arrows show where I have saved a satellite image, below.



Images facing direction of travel...

nr-1)


nr-2)


nr-3) Trail to San Isidoro to north here:


nr-4) Second trail north to SPM trail, passes mine tunnel:


nr-5)


Junction with road to El Morro)


nr-6)


nr-7)


nr-8)


El Rosarito)


nr-9 on El Morro road) Two mine driveways, left and right:


nr-10) El Morro junction


Map again:


I believe the Baja 1000 ran this way at least once to get south without using highways... reaches Hwy. 1 east of El Rosario at Los Martires/ Arenoso.

[Edited on 3-5-2009 by David K]

Mexitron - 3-4-2009 at 06:00 PM

Interesting--you DO have alot of time on your hands!

I vaguely recollect this road being there in 2004 and thinking the access to the mission might have been easier from there--it might be on my old topo map. I think there was also an old road going into Rancho San Antonio but it was pretty well washed out. How does this road connect up with Rancho La Suerte? Maybe you have to head south to the El Salto or Rosarito and then go back north to La Suerte.

Sorry for the editing --I keep getting R. San Antonio and San Isidoro mixed up...see what happens when you stay away too long!

[Edited on 3-5-2009 by Mexitron]

[Edited on 3-5-2009 by Mexitron]

David K - 3-4-2009 at 06:04 PM

El Suerte is just off that map, east of El Rosarito.

See the new post about the SPM Mission trail, on the Nomad Hiking and Backpacking forum... I have a question for you about your trip.

Here is the San Pedro Martir trail post: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=37434

[Edited on 3-6-2009 by David K]

Mexitron - 3-4-2009 at 06:10 PM

Rats, can't find the topo...looks like great exploring though! That country, especially south, seems to always have new roads cut into it by the Yucca harvesters. In the 80s there were new roads put in by the government for ranching too, I think.

David K - 3-4-2009 at 06:13 PM

Check u2u and see my SPM mission trail from space post.

Thanks!

By the way, the old Atlas shows only a trail from Nueva York to San Isidoro, as did the 2003 Almanac.

Wonder if the 2009 Almanac has these new roads?

David K - 3-6-2009 at 12:08 PM

Has anyone been on this new mountain road?

Barry A. - 1-30-2010 at 06:21 PM

Excellent work, David. I love this stuff!!!

Barry

cristobal - 1-30-2010 at 06:50 PM

These roads are my kind of baja ... Thanks, David ...

David K - 1-31-2010 at 09:49 AM

10-4 on that! Good to hear from you Cristobal! Please post any trip reports... You like going to the high country between San Ignacio and Mulege too, right?

Mexitron - 1-31-2010 at 10:47 AM

It rains hard in those areas---good chance its been compromised after the latest rains....

David K - 2-2-2010 at 10:11 AM

Yah, in the summer I would like to drive it... a huge new to explore part of Baja!

Mexitron - 2-2-2010 at 12:30 PM

I haven't been in that area since the mission trip...Its very interesting botanically---you've got the SPM Juniper Oak Woodlands meeting the last vestiges of foothill chapparal and Calif. coastal scrub meeting Blue Palm canyons meeting the beginnings of the Central Desert vegetation. of course its just plain fun exploring too. We're trying for a SPM trip in June...don't know if we'll have time or means to make a second leg further south but I'm getting giddy to explore that area again...maybe even hike up Arroyo Grande this time---with all the rain it could be verdant.

ELINVESTIG8R - 2-2-2010 at 12:41 PM

David K. When it comes to La Baja I don't think anyone can hold a candle to you! Keep it coming Brother!

David

56MM# - 2-3-2010 at 10:31 AM

I did part of that route on May 25, 2001, specifically the area between NR1 and NR2 on Davidís satellite images. This route is also depicted as a dotted line that runs through Canada Cascalote on page N-16 of the mid-90s version of the Baja Almanac (orange cover). At the time, that was the extent of the road, or rather trail. Am sad to see yet another road cut into what was until recently a very remote and pristine area of northern Baja California. For what itís worth, hereís my trip report:

I saw this road in the Baja Almanac and was fascinated that there might be a different route to Mision San Pedro Martir. After hours of staring at the map and imagining the possibilities, I convinced a friend to spend Memorial Day weekend poking around the backcountry.

Vehicle was a 1995 Toyota 4-Runner with 32-inch BFG Mud Terrains, rear locking differential and a mild suspension lift (thicker springs and torsion bars). As it turned out, it required every bit of my truckís capability to make it through.

Spend the night before camped in the hills east of San Quintin, clear of civilization and out of sight of Highway 1. We started east shortly after sunrise the next morning. Except for a three mile stretch in the middle which required 4WD, the road to Nueva York was easily passable by a 2WD pickup truck. Along the road, we came upon a rattlesnake soaking up some sun.

Nueva York was either a part time or abandoned rancho. The few structures we saw were made of poles, sticks and palm fronds, good for keeping out the rain but offering little protection from wind or cold. There were several cattle hides stretched out on wooden racks. No persons were present.

There were several short side roads around Nueva York. After taking each one and discovering that none went more than a mile from the rancho, we were ready to head back. As I looked east and squinted, I saw what looked like a graded road cut into a hillside. Looking through binoculars confirmed what I saw, however we could see no road that led from the rancho to the graded road. The only way to this road was through a flat and somewhat moist field with some medium-size rocks that we had to dodge. This would be our first of several areas we would have to cross to get to the continuation of the trail.

The road cut into the hillside was fairly rocky but passable. After maybe two miles, the road disappeared altogether and became a series of intermittent trails barely passable to a vehicle. There were so many areas where we had to stop and walk as far as 1/8 of a mile to find where the trail started up again. We spend more time out of the vehicle looking for the trail than moving forward in my truck. There were stretches where I could have used a chain saw. A skilled spotter was a must as there were numerous obstacles where it took the exact right tire placement to get through. Each time we got past a particularly challenging obstacle, I would wonder if we would make it back out when the time came.

After several hours of rock crawling, tilted trails, overgrown vegetation and stream crossings with high banks, all of which resulted in bottoming out and tail dragging, we reached the end of the trail. Here are the coordinates (degrees/minutes/seconds) and altitude where the passable portion of the trail ended: N 32 42 04.2 W 115 36 51.6 3300 feet MSL.

It was clear that this was the end. The area was a very small box canyon with 5 to 10 foot walls. There was a circle of rocks and firepit that had probably not been used for years. I also noted a respectable amount of faded beer cans. There was no way even a motorcycle could continue. The only ways forward from here are by foot or mule. Either way, I think it would take a skilled trail finder and capable rock climber to reach the mission.

Getting out the way we came in was just as challenging. Things looked totally different from the opposite angles. Obstacles that we cleared going down were much harder going up, especially out of streams.

We did not get back to San Quintin until an hour after dark. It took all the daylight a late-May day had to offer (over 13 hours I believe). As every experienced backcountry traveler knows, when the sun goes down it is very difficult to navigate. At the end of the day, my truckís sides were pretty scratched up. Sumac bushes were the biggest culprits. But is was worth every scratch.

I think we were lucky. I would not do this route alone again. Nor would I imbibe, something that rounds out the whole Baja backcountry experience, taking it from excellent to perfect. You are basically out there in a very remote part of the peninsula with no backup. Looking back, we probably pushed a bit too hard with my truck. There were many obstacles that we barely got past. And the tilt of some areas could cause a lifted vehicle to roll.

To this day, the Nueva York route, as we call it, remains one of my two favorite Baja California side trips, the other being San Juan de las Pilas. For me, the feeling of sheer remoteness is the greatest appeal. There were no power lines or other signs of civilization, other than wheel tracks and the occasional faded beer can. Even Baja cow pies were few and far between. To me it felt even more remote than the Maze District of Canyonlands National Park. I have never felt so isolated in my life than I did east of Nueva York. One cannot put the feeling into words. The area is wild, even by Baja California standards. If you are after remoteness and unspoiled scenery, then this is the place for you.

David K - 2-3-2010 at 10:39 AM

Wow... THANK YOU for that story and a BIG welcome to Baja Nomad, 56mm# :wow::D

Mexitron - 2-3-2010 at 06:33 PM

Oh man, now I really wanna go! Nice report there 56mm.

One thing about summer David--it can be blistering hot out there...not always though--if there's a good marine layer at the coast it might not be too bad.

BajaGringo - 2-3-2010 at 08:18 PM

Great post 56mm and welcome to the forum...

56MM# - 2-8-2010 at 10:33 AM

My first experience in this area was driving to Meling Ranch and the observatory many years ago. Scenery begins as one starts the climb out of the San Telmo valley. It was Spring, and the area had experienced a wetter than normal winter. The hillsides were green with yellow flowers. I imagined that this was what the inland valleys of San Diego County looked like 100 years ago.

I think alot of Baja aficionados blow past the western slopes of the Sierra San Pedro Martir for places further south. The old rule that the real Baja doesn't start until El Rosario drives us to do just this, and the axiom may not be completely true. IMHO, this area may be the best part of Baja north of El Rosario.

David, thanks for finding this road. I now feel like I have to go down there. I think itís doable over a four-day period: Leave San Diego Friday morning, spend Friday night camped somewhere east of Nueva York, explore Saturday and Sunday, spend Sunday night in El Rosario, and drive home Monday.

Still have mixed feelings about this road. On one hand, the area is now accessible to vehicles, which will certainly bring more people into the area, not usually a good thing. On the other hand, the accessibility allows me to further explore this area. My selfish side hopes that the recent rains did some damage to the road, which will hopefully discourage visitors. So only the most determined Baja lovers will go.

When I was there nine years ago, it felt like we were some of the few gringos that had ventured into the area. Even so, we barely scratched the surface. That feeling will draw me back.

David K - 2-8-2010 at 10:56 AM

If you think it may be too wet up there... join us at Santa Ynez Saturday morning!

Here is the new Sierra road drawn onto the new Almanac:





[Edited on 2-8-2010 by David K]

56MM# - 2-10-2010 at 03:49 PM

David, thanks for the maps and the invite. One day I would like to join you all on one of your trips.

David K - 2-10-2010 at 04:25 PM

I would love to have you join us anytime!

The love of Baja is what this forum is about...

56MM# - 5-13-2011 at 02:44 PM

Looks like I will finally have the opportunity to check out this new road. Two of us will be heading down that way 5-8 June.

Has anyone done this road yet? Also, looks like there are some roads and washes east of El Bateque and El Sauce de Carter on the western slopes of SSPM. Anyone know if these roads are passable and if the area is worth exploring? And given that neither of us prefers to camp, is El Rosario the best place to get a motel? San Quintin has always given me a creepy feeling.

Or perhaps there is a better use of our time. We will have two full days to four wheel and can probably squeeze some off roading in the morning of 8 June before we head north.

Given a choice between crossing at Tecate or Otay Mesa around sunset, what is the better way to get back to San Diego?

Appreciate any and all replies.

Baja Bucko - 5-13-2011 at 03:38 PM

If I were in your shoes I'd go adventuring in the areas you mentioned after Mary Jane cultivation/ harvest season is over...oh yea, watch for cascabeles!!!

Everytime I have hiked/packed the SSPM area I have always met the critters. Late spring is wake-up time and they aren't usually in a good mood then!

David K - 5-13-2011 at 03:52 PM

Tecate is my northbound crossing point of choice.

The huge washout rains of January, 2010 may have had an impact on the back country roads.

I hope you get through and please take several photos of the road as it progresses east, then south to where-ever you return to the highway!

Thank you very much!

Bajahowodd - 5-13-2011 at 03:53 PM

Sorta having a brain fart here. Isn't there a couple developing a "resort" up there catering to folks who are into stargazing? Seem to recall they have a web site. Just cannot recall the name.

BajaGringo - 5-13-2011 at 03:59 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Bajahowodd
Sorta having a brain fart here. Isn't there a couple developing a "resort" up there catering to folks who are into stargazing? Seem to recall they have a web site. Just cannot recall the name.


That would be astrobaja. The website is:

Baja Dark Skies Inn

[Edited on 5-13-2011 by BajaGringo]

Bajahowodd - 5-13-2011 at 04:01 PM

Muchas Gracias.

56MM# - 5-16-2011 at 09:48 AM

Thanks guys. Will take plenty of pictures and watch for rattlesnakes.

Ken Cooke - 5-16-2011 at 05:35 PM

This sounds like prime Baja campout country! :bounce: I was talking to my friend Mikey Mike this weekend, and he plans on getting his passcard to return to Baja.

If I have a chance this summer, I will be up for a week of camping in this Sierra region of Baja.

TMW - 5-16-2011 at 07:42 PM

Ken we need to do a trip down the pacific coast so we can do a report on the best fishing and surfing spots. People want to know where they are and we should tell them. The heck with woody.

Ken Cooke - 5-16-2011 at 08:17 PM

I have been dying to get back up to the Sierra San Pedro Martir park. It has been 10 years since I drove a Ford Ranger up into the woods there, and had to hike out. Moral of the story???

Plus, with the route leading to the Kiliwas Native American sites and the Mision de Sierra San Pedro Martir makes this an interesting one. I am tentative at best at the moment, but that will change in the next month. In other words, I cannot plan just yet.

BajaGringo - 5-16-2011 at 08:25 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Ken Cooke
I have been dying to get back up to the Sierra San Pedro Martir park. It has been 10 years since I drove a Ford Ranger up into the woods there, and had to hike out. Moral of the story???


Buy a Toyota?

:lol::lol::lol:

DK paid me to say that...

Ken Cooke - 5-16-2011 at 08:28 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by BajaGringo
Quote:
Originally posted by Ken Cooke
Moral of the story???


Buy a Toyota?

:lol::lol::lol:

DK paid me to say that...


In 2001, David K probably told me to do this! Here we are back in '01 on Shell Island.

Amigos de Baja:bounce:


David K - 5-16-2011 at 10:05 PM

Yup... that was my first Tacoma... what a great truck... never a failure or breakdown in the 136,000 miles/ 5 years I had it!

Neal Johns was who instructed me to get a Tacoma... I listened!


Ken Cooke - 5-19-2011 at 08:50 PM

Anyone up for a trip along this route 4th of July weekend?

Desertbull - 5-19-2011 at 08:59 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Ken Cooke
I have been dying to get back up to the Sierra San Pedro Martir park. It has been 10 years since I drove a Ford Ranger up into the woods there, and had to hike out. Moral of the story???

Plus, with the route leading to the Kiliwas Native American sites and the Mision de Sierra San Pedro Martir makes this an interesting one. I am tentative at best at the moment, but that will change in the next month. In other words, I cannot plan just yet.


The flatbed trailer is still available my friend...maybe I should pull it down south and stage it for you? Lol

David K - 5-19-2011 at 09:06 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Desertbull
Quote:
Originally posted by Ken Cooke
I have been dying to get back up to the Sierra San Pedro Martir park. It has been 10 years since I drove a Ford Ranger up into the woods there, and had to hike out. Moral of the story???

Plus, with the route leading to the Kiliwas Native American sites and the Mision de Sierra San Pedro Martir makes this an interesting one. I am tentative at best at the moment, but that will change in the next month. In other words, I cannot plan just yet.


The flatbed trailer is still available my friend...maybe I should pull it down south and stage it for you? Lol


That is very funny Tim :lol: He went from a Ranger to a Jeep, so the trailer will indeed be good to have available! :light:

Ken Cooke - 5-19-2011 at 09:25 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Desertbull

The flatbed trailer is still available my friend...maybe I should pull it down south and stage it for you? Lol


Ouch! That hurts...:smug:

Mexitron - 5-20-2011 at 08:02 AM

Ken---you probably know this already but in the last ten years many of those SPM roads have been closed...just in case you were wanting to explore. We used to have a blast up there when we had free reign of all the roads...

Ken Cooke - 5-20-2011 at 05:42 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mexitron
Ken---you probably know this already but in the last ten years many of those SPM roads have been closed...just in case you were wanting to explore. We used to have a blast up there when we had free reign of all the roads...


I've been down several of these "closed" routes in the past. The Rangers have told me that gates have been erected to keep out people who enjoy setting fire to the forest.

Mexitron - 5-21-2011 at 09:52 AM

We went past the gate across the Blue Bottle road, someone reported us and the Rangers were trying to decide how to punish us....heh, until I gave him some nice cigars. So do you ask permission ahead of time?

David K - 5-21-2011 at 10:53 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mexitron
We went past the gate across the Blue Bottle road, someone reported us and the Rangers were trying to decide how to punish us....heh, until I gave him some nice cigars. So do you ask permission ahead of time?


The first web page I made to show off another's photos was this one, from 11 years ago (Ken's photos in San Pedro Martir Park): http://www.vivabaja.com/kensbaja/index.html

mtgoat666 - 5-21-2011 at 11:22 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mexitron
We went past the gate across the Blue Bottle road, someone reported us and the Rangers were trying to decide how to punish us....heh, until I gave him some nice cigars. So do you ask permission ahead of time?


what did you not understand about the signed gate? it is pretty clear that the park is managed, so makes me wonder what ego or brain disfunction makes one violate the gates and signs...

perhaps the park staff need to be encouraged to increase fines. perhaps confiscation of violating vehicles would provide the park the much needed revenue to pay for more rangers to patrol for marooons like ken mexitron!

"but ranger rick, the sign/gate doesn't apply to gringos. we are americans! we can do what we want! F your national park, we don't care about your stupid rules!" said meximarooon and kennyjeep

[Edited on 5-21-2011 by mtgoat666]

Mexitron - 5-21-2011 at 12:39 PM

The gate had been torn out of the ground...many times...and we were on a mission to lay a good friend's ashes to rest; he had been coming to The San Pedro Martir since the 1950s and was a favorite, should I say sacred, destination of his...sometimes you have to bend the rules. In fact, what I didn't mention was that mostly got us off the hook was when I told the guard what we were doing out there and whose ashes they were---his eyes lit up---he remembered Myron quite fondly as someone who was always nice and always brought the guards a gift on the way in to the park. "Que puede passar senor." Get a life, goat.

David K - 5-21-2011 at 01:39 PM

How wonderful of you Steve!

Goat, in your thinking, man is the alien on this planet and keeping man from seeing, traveling, enjoying the land is your goal (except the places you want to go to, naturally).

There are plenty of people who, because of age (too young or too old), time limits, or physical handicaps, cannot hike all the places they want to see. What one man has the right to tell another where he can go on public or open land?

Ken Cooke - 5-21-2011 at 02:02 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mexitron
We went past the gate across the Blue Bottle road, someone reported us and the Rangers were trying to decide how to punish us....heh, until I gave him some nice cigars. So do you ask permission ahead of time?


You invite a Ranger to ride along. That way, someone has the keys.:light:

Udo - 5-21-2011 at 02:24 PM

Superb find, David!

Back in the 60's and 70's all we had for maps were what was available from the Auto Club. No Googleearth, no almanac. Vague ideas from reading someone else's Baja books.
You, Ken Mexitron, as well as others on this board are doing a more advanced trail riding than we did at that time.
All of you really have your chit together much better than we did back in those days.

Ken Cooke - 5-21-2011 at 02:57 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mexitron
We went past the gate across the Blue Bottle road, someone reported us and the Rangers were trying to decide how to punish us....heh, until I gave him some nice cigars. So do you ask permission ahead of time?


You are supposed to ask permission. These gates were placed to keep the local people out who have been prone to setting fires to the forest for fun. I have gone to the Ranger station and offered to give the guys a ride along the routes for sightseeing purposes, and they would ride along to check for anything out of the ordinary or possible smouldering fires.

Udo - 5-21-2011 at 03:29 PM

I neglected to mention earlier...

Lowrance has a new GPS geared toward BAJA travel. I'll give a report after my trip South this coming December.

http://www.thegpsstore.com/Lowrance-Elite-5M-Baja-Off-Road-G...

[Edited on 5-21-2011 by Udo]

bajalou - 5-21-2011 at 03:41 PM

Doesn't sound like it has much detail maps for Baja.

"The Lowrance Elite 5M Baja comes pre-loaded with global basemap with major roads and with this detail it is perfect for your dune buggy, offroad truck or Jeep"

Might have to get Bicmaps or LB maps for the detail trails etc.

Picacho Diablo, San Felipe, Sea of Cortez and Tijuana

Ken Cooke - 5-21-2011 at 03:42 PM

Tijuana the dog is standing in front of the world's ONLY ceramic mosaic of Picacho Diablo Mtn. The steps are still for sale, woohoo!:bounce:



Mexitron - 5-22-2011 at 11:43 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Ken Cooke
Quote:
Originally posted by Mexitron
We went past the gate across the Blue Bottle road, someone reported us and the Rangers were trying to decide how to punish us....heh, until I gave him some nice cigars. So do you ask permission ahead of time?


You are supposed to ask permission. These gates were placed to keep the local people out who have been prone to setting fires to the forest for fun. I have gone to the Ranger station and offered to give the guys a ride along the routes for sightseeing purposes, and they would ride along to check for anything out of the ordinary or possible smouldering fires.


Good to know...

56MM# - 6-3-2011 at 10:27 AM

The time has come to explore the road east of Nueva York and pick up where we left off 10 years ago. Looks like we will be leaving Sunday and returning Wednesday. We plan to depart Sunday late morning and drive to El Rosario. Monday and Tuesday would be devoted to exploring the area, starting at the intersection of Hwy 1 and the road east to Nueva York (just north of San Quintin centro). Plan to drive north Wednesday and cross at Otay Mesa.

It appears that our best option for lodging and staging is the Baja Cactus Motel in El Rosario. Have read only positive comments about this motel.

Some questions:

- Do we need reservations, or is it OK to just show up?
- How late is Baja Cactus open?
- What's the best time to cross at Otay Mesa? IAW, should we head north early Wednesday and arrive at the border early afternoon, or should we not get to the border until the evening (and spend more time in Mexico!)

All advice is welcome and greatly appreciated.

Thanks again to David K for finding this road.

Ken Cooke - 6-3-2011 at 05:22 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by 56MM#
Some questions:

- Do we need reservations, or is it OK to just show up?
- How late is Baja Cactus open?
- What's the best time to cross at Otay Mesa? IAW, should we head north early Wednesday and arrive at the border early afternoon, or should we not get to the border until the evening (and spend more time in Mexico!)

All advice is welcome and greatly appreciated.

Thanks again to David K for finding this road.


I wish I was going...Baja Cactus is a very nice Motel. Vastly superior to Mama Espinoza's Motel. The lobby is open 24/7. It helps if you speak Spanish, or Google Translate your questions in advance, if you have any at the time of check-in. Their email address is: info@bajacactus.com

Baja Cactus will only hold your reservation until 7 p.m. on the particular day that you reserve your room. Be sure to have $cash$ for your transactions.

David K - 6-3-2011 at 05:37 PM

I suggest the motel phone number and make your reservation directly... If nobody speaks English (rare) then call back again. The number is on the web site home page http://www.bajacactus.com
You can try emailing them at motel@bajacactus.com (the other email Ken gave may also work, but that is Antonio's email and he is not very good at responding to it. Dealing with Pemex demands most of his time.

I suggest you return through Tecate... just a few more miles east of Otay, but half the wait... They do close from 11 pm to 5 am however.

Please take many photos along the road and record the mileages, if you don't mind! I wish I could go!!!

Ken Cooke - 6-3-2011 at 05:52 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by David K
I suggest the motel phone number and make your reservation directly... If nobody speaks English (rare) then call back again.


After you call, if you are not understood in English, or Spanish by the receptionist - it is not you. :?:

56MM# - 6-5-2011 at 08:10 AM

Thanks guys. Will post report and pictures after we return.

BajaGringo - 6-5-2011 at 12:26 PM

Baja was once all wide open territory where could almost explore at will. The reality of today is that landowners are growing tired of dealing with trash, noise, dust and drug growers/transporters. Offroad racing events are a lot of fun but if beer cans, trash and baby diapers are left scattered behind after folks go back home, I suspect that there will even more locked gates appearing in the near future.

I know of more than one expressing these very concerns.

[Edited on 6-5-2011 by BajaGringo]

David K - 6-5-2011 at 12:48 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by BajaGringo
Baja was once all wide open territory where could almost explore at will. The reality of today is that landowners are growing tired of dealing with trash, noise, dust and drug growers/transporters. Offroad racing events are a lot of fun but if beer cans, trash and baby diapers are left scattered behind after folks go back home, I suspect that there will even more locked gates appearing in the near future.

I know of more than one expressing these very concerns.

[Edited on 6-5-2011 by BajaGringo]


So so true... and I don't blame the ranchers one bit!

It was a shock to see the mountains of beer bottles just left on the ground by all the 'local' spectators as they left with their empty pick up trucks following the race... that was in 2003. I hope deposits and other such incentives will cause them to take out what they bring in, or intice others to come in and pick up... Chris and I filled an extra trash bag before we left. http://vivabaja.com/500




[Edited on 6-5-2011 by David K]

wilderone - 6-6-2011 at 07:21 AM

"The reality of today is that landowners are growing tired of dealing with trash, noise, dust and drug growers/transporters"

When I was in the area 3-4 years ago, I saw many signs on the barbed wire fences that pertained to No Motorcycles, No Trespassing. We would be driving slowly to be able to sightsee, and there they were - 3 or 4 noisy motorcycles going as fast as they could down the dirt road like it was their personal race track. These riders also are to blame for tracks and erosion all over hills and anywhere they think they can go. Pests.

BajaGringo - 6-6-2011 at 08:16 AM

We get some out here on the beach from time to time, mainly around holidays / three day weekends. We have a particular road here that is sandy and steep that we try to keep graded so folks here in the community can get in and out easily. Some of these bike/quad riders think it is their personal trail for fun and seem to delight in ripping roostertails as they tear the road up going back and forth, leaving us with a mess to deal with once they are gone, to say nothing of dozens of beer cans and other trash.

In half an hour they manage to destroy an entire days work. One of the neighbors put up a sign asking them to take care of the road and they simply ran it down, quad tire track right across the sign.

I like to ride but some out there seem to have absolutely no sense of common courtesy and good manners...

56MM# - 6-16-2011 at 10:06 AM

Made it back in one piece. Am working on a trip report and hope to get it posted by next week.

In the meantime, here's a picture from May 2001, the last time we were down there. The picture is representative of all the time we spent in streambeds.

56MM# - 6-16-2011 at 10:07 AM

OK, the picture didn't make it onto the post. Using the attachment function didn't work. Can someone please tell me how to post pictures.

Ken Cooke - 6-16-2011 at 11:10 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by 56MM#
OK, the picture didn't make it onto the post. Using the attachment function didn't work. Can someone please tell me how to post pictures.
Send it to me, and I'll have it posted in 15 seconds.

David K - 2-15-2018 at 09:59 AM

Bump of a good thread from 2009-2011 on the mountain road behind and around San Quintin/El Rosario, that passes near San Isidoro.

ehall - 2-15-2018 at 10:08 AM

I started on page 1 without looking at the date. lol was excited for your trip to santa Ynez.