BajaNomad

Salsipuedes Canyon by Fatbike

 Pages:  1    3    5

larryC - 1-5-2014 at 10:58 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Hook
OK, then it's Rokons and one of these: Who's in?



That is what we used on our first trip. Works really well as long as the water is relatively calm.
See the boat here:
http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=33067#pid7093...

larryC - 1-5-2014 at 11:08 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Santiago
LarryC and others who have been from the beach: would a Honda Trail 90 work? Tires too skinny?


Jim
I'm not an expert on what a Honda trail 90 can do but you could probably make it up quite a ways. If you wanted to spend the night with any kind of comfort then you would probably need something that could haul a little camping gear. You would want to hit the beach at hi tide cause there is no sand there, just 4 to 6 inch diameter round rocks. if there was much surf then it would be a problem to get the bikes out of the boat.
You thinking about organizing a trip up there?
Larry

Mark_BC - 1-5-2014 at 12:44 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by DosMars
Looks like he's back at the car. Wonder if he's going back to BoLA or headed down to the beach...


Both... I deserve a break. Well that was quite a hike up to that saddle. I rode my bike across the lakebed to that first "island", and stashed the bike there. I then kept walking and it is actually really easy to get fairly close to the hill up the saddle, I could have ridden the bike all the way, you just have to watch out for the chollas, and I got up to about 560 m elevation for that campsite (from 260 m where the car was), and you barely feel the elevation gain because it's so gradual. But from that campsite there is a huge rocky slope up to the pass (only 250 m elev gain but very rough and rocky). I did it in the a.m. before it got hot. It took me an hour but I am really good at climbing hills. There is lots of loose rocks and agaves ready to stab your leg with one misstep.

I only made it to the saddle. I could have gone farther but I was fretting about the bike and car being left down in the lake (there is a dirt road only 100 m east of that island and if someone drove that and saw my tracks they could have just taken the bike), and all the things that could go wrong. I am funny that way, I have to be in control of all my material stuff or I get uneasy. So I turned around and made it back to the car in a few hours.

Interestingly the terrain on the other side of the saddle looks super easy, it's almost ride-able through the desert, at least for the first kilometer. I didn't see much further past that point because I would have had to do more hiking through the rocks to get around the next hill to see down the valley. I knew after the fact that I would wish I had... but seeing that it goes down 200 m elev over 5 km, until that big confluence, I can't see it being too bad. There is one pool I can see on Google Earth, which is a cause for concern because there's obviously a reason for a pool which means difficult rocks.

But, I think that route in would work if you're really fit and like climbing hills, lugging 150 pounds of gear up. But there is no way a Rokon or anything that can't be broken down into pieces 50 lb or smaller is getting in there. I'd just have to budget a couple days and a bunch of water to get my stuff up that saddle, and hope I don't twist my leg. I'd like to do it with other people too, and bring along a better satellite system. Spot has this new phone for $550 that allows for internet and talking. I love being out there but I don't like being cut off from what's going in in the rest of the world.

So... when does it start getting warm down here? Maybe I could pull together a March trip. Otherwise, next year.

[Edited on 1-5-2014 by Mark_BC]

larryC - 1-5-2014 at 04:07 PM

Mark
I would have been really surprised if you had found an easy way into there, but I was hoping. One of the reasons that place is still such a mystery is because there is hardly any way into there. The easiest way in that I found was by water. When you say you saw pools on GE what do you mean? I saw lots of places with green palm trees but most didn't have above ground water. The few that did, the water was running and was only on the surface for short distances.
The weather will start getting too warm in late April or May (I mean up in the hills) so November through March and even into April can be good months.
Say Hi to Roger for me there at Villa Bahia.
Larry

David K - 1-5-2014 at 05:46 PM

Thank you for sharing your adventure with us!

Mark_BC - 1-5-2014 at 07:50 PM

Larry, look here on GE for pools: 29deg 15' 50'' N 113deg 58' 6'' W. And there are a bunch starting from the farthest point I got on my western approach attempt, going all the way to near the confluence with the eastern wash.

Thanks for all the support guys, it sure was fun. I'm glad it's so hard to get in, that's why it's such a mystery and remains unspoiled. The desert is really beautiful this time of year, especially when you get away from the cattle. Birds and bees and hummingbirds everywhere, it's full of life. I wish I wasn't always rushing so hard to finish these kinds of trips, I'd like to spend more time searching for wildlife. On the hillslope near that saddle are a bunch of zigzag animal trails going up a scree slope. I would guess antelope. And there were lots of animal prints in the sand. The larger ones puma?

I have lots of video and photos and I want to make a little movie about it, just gotta buy the software now, I have a fast computer back home.

DosMars - 1-5-2014 at 08:36 PM

Welcome back Tocayo! Glad you made it back in one piece. Following along on your spot page has got me all jazzed up to do some beach combing along those out of the way places that collect so much good stuff. Josh and Morgan are in, we just have to pick a date (and get my bike back in beach-combing condition!)

We'll touch bases and meet up in TJ Thursday...

-Mark.

[Edited on 1-6-2014 by DosMars]

Paulina - 1-5-2014 at 08:55 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by larryC

David
Yes, that is the place, mas o' menos. Herman and I went out there about 10 years ago. He was kind enough to help me in trying to find a way into the canyon overland. He showed me about where they camped and then showed me what he called a trail up and over the hill towards Botica dry lake. You have to take a lot of what Herman said with a grain of salt, but on that day he seemed pretty straight forward. We had a good time. He had lots of stories. Some true and others suspect. I never found what I consider an easy way in there. You can walk in or even take animals in there but you have to bring so much water for an expedition like that, that it gets to be too much real quick. it is a very unforgiving place until you get into the canyon itself. In the canyon itself there was lots of water and shade from palm trees so pretty pleasant.


Tonight I was looking through Herman's photo albums one more time before sending them to his family and came across some that he had written "Salsipuedes" on the back. I wish I had paid better attention when he would pull out his album and talk stories. It might be difficult to see in this photo, but there are lots of palms and water. Herman would have been a great resource for this adventure.



P>*)))>{

Frigatebird - 1-5-2014 at 09:10 PM

Mark,
If you plan another attempt this Spring, I can join you for the hike/ride/packraft April 12th-20th. I may be able to provide transportation from LA to Laguna Seca, and pick up at Punta Candeleros. Just thinking out loud.

Hook - 1-5-2014 at 09:46 PM

LarryC, is that landing craft still in the Bahia or ?

larryC - 1-6-2014 at 09:36 AM

Hook
Yes it is still in Bahia.

David K - 1-6-2014 at 09:40 AM

Adventure spawns adventure! Awesome!:cool:

larryC - 1-6-2014 at 09:46 AM

Mark
Looks more like a grove of palm trees to me. Lots of palm groves but not many pools. Who knows. Just have to go there to find out for sure.
Larry

DosMars - 1-9-2014 at 08:28 AM

Quick update-
Just spoke with Mark, we're still on to meet up at the car rental in TJ at noon today. Hopefully he'll have some photos up by this evening.
I'm looking forward to the drive home, I told him he's driving so I can get a sneak peak at the photos & footage!

-Mark...

[Edited on 1-9-2014 by DosMars]

David K - 1-9-2014 at 11:32 AM

Thank you Mark... and look forward to seeing Mark's photos!

David K - 1-13-2014 at 11:13 AM

Any updates yet? Mark get home okay?

Mark_BC - 1-13-2014 at 01:12 PM

Hi David, we got back OK, just went up to Jalama for a couple days. I fly out of LA tomorrow so I'm getting organized. All my photos are in raw format so I have to convert & figure out how to add here. I'll have lots of time at the aurport tomorrow...

David K - 1-13-2014 at 02:10 PM

10-4... I am happy to post photos for you if you get in a bind, but what most do here is join Photobucket.com, create an an album for each trip or for Baja Nomad (if you don't take lots of trips), click on the UPLOAD, Click on the little gear symbol in the right corner, choose 800 or 640 pixels and click save. See my post: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=71557 in the Photo forum here.

wilderone - 1-15-2014 at 10:22 AM

Mark - what a fantastic adventure - loved following along. Glad you stayed healthy. Looking forward to seeing pics.

Mark_BC - 1-15-2014 at 05:24 PM

OK so here are a few of the first photos. It's going to take a while to sort through them so I'll just post them as I go, over several days.

First campsite halfway up the road from Highway 1:
29°13'23.41" N 114°03'01.61" W


Packed up the next morning:



The only gate I encountered:


Getting close to the rocky / blocky terrain which you can see on the right. Asamblea is over that saddle right of center, to the left of the blocky hill:


The palm trees grow out of the rocks all the way to the top of the hills, they aren't restricted to the valley bottoms:


Going down the wash to the head of the canyon:
29°15'40.48" N 114°01'12.89" W


Just about to enter the canyon:
29°15'41.93" N 114°01'07.64" W




Some of the rocks look pretty precarious:


[Edited on 1-16-2014 by Mark_BC]

[Edited on 1-16-2014 by Mark_BC]

[Edited on 1-16-2014 by Mark_BC]

[Edited on 2-6-2014 by Mark_BC]

David K - 1-15-2014 at 05:45 PM

Epic Baja Adventure! Great photos Mark... :biggrin:

Mark_BC - 1-19-2014 at 11:05 PM

Thanks wilderone and David. I have been freight-trained by a nasty flu but I managed to put some more photos together of the next day. Maybe later I'll go back and edit and put GPS coordinates on them.

First camp in the canyon: 29°15'42.92" N 114°01'06.83" W




I rode a little ways down from here which was fun, with a few rocks thrown in. But then I got to the first 15' "cliff" I had to scale. The videos are much more interesting. I'll have to figure out how to embed them later. Looking down the cliff:
29°15'50.32" N 114°00'57.89" W


Shortly after this I came to a cattle area that is accessed by a longer trail outside the canyon. So I didn't need to scale the cliff. This is the first major green area you see in GE, because there is water here: 29°15'56.74" N 114°00'56.15" W


Another gate: 29°16'01.93" N 114°00'57.34" W


Clear water flowing through the cow patties:
29°16'03.16" N 114°00'56.31" W


I followed the wash for quite a ways after this, not too difficult. I could ride almost all of it:


Details of bike:


29°16'09.49" N 114°00'30.80" W


The canyon walls started narrowing:
29°16'07.22" N 114°00'27.59" W


The canyon turned north and was very rocky. I had to carry my gear in stages. I got as far as another "big" cliff and set up camp: 29°16'07.62" N 114°00'24.69" W


[Edited on 2-6-2014 by Mark_BC]

Barry A. - 1-19-2014 at 11:18 PM

Just outstanding photos, Mark. What beautiful country!!!

Barry

David K - 1-20-2014 at 10:26 AM

Thanks Mark... wild country indeed! What looks like a 'walk in the park' on Google Earth is far different in person!

Mark_BC - 1-20-2014 at 12:26 PM

Would you say they seem dark? Or is it my computer? I may have to brighten them.

Barry A. - 1-20-2014 at 02:01 PM

They look great to me, Mark.

Barry

David K - 1-20-2014 at 02:18 PM

Agree with Barry, the photos look perfect. :light:

Mark_BC - 1-21-2014 at 11:38 PM

That night the cold I had been fighting really drowned me; I'd wake up every hour gasping for air. The nights were pretty miserable and long, and cold. I was worried about taking too much of my gear over these cliffs and then discovering some impenetrable barrier further down and having to get it all back up if I had to backtrack. So I decided I'd spend the next day hiking down the canyon with only my essential gear and tent if I wanted to spend a night down there. Then if it turned out OK I'd come back and get my bike.

The campsite above the "cliff":
29°16'12.57" N 114°00'20.88" W




Looking to the east wall of the canyon:


Raven sitting on top of hill on north side of canyon, with the telephoto lens:


While packing up the tent this guy crawled away:


From above it looked like there was no way down other than by rope which I did not want to risk. So I did the 15 minute hike up over the rocky hill to the west to get around it. Shortly after the cliff it gets really rocky for a short while then turns east into that big long sandy wash you can see on GE:
29°16'14.48" N 114°00'19.60" W looking NE


Cactus in a pot:


The wash mellowed out, as I could see from GE:
Around 29°16'03.13" N 113°59'53.54" W looking nothwest


It got a bit narrower with tamarisk hemming it in;
Around 29°15'55.30" N 113°59'37.88" W looking NW


Then the wash abruptly turns north. This was a really nice spot with lots of birds and cactus:
29°15'54.91" N 113°59'33.98" W looking W


At this point was some drying mud from the wash that enters from the south: 29°15'54.64" N 113°59'33.72" W looking S


There were lots of "large" animal tracks, but nothing very recent. I doubt there are coyotes here since it's so rocky. It must be mountain lion. I continued north after hitting my Spot: Same location looking N


Somewhere around 29°16'05.58" N 113°59'33.20" W looking N


Somewhere around 29°16'10.28" N 113°59'33.98" W looking N


I knew from GE there was something at the north end of this section of wash before it again turns east and gets more green. I suspected a pool, and I was right:
29°16'13.80" N 113°59'32.71" W


There was no way I could hike down that. The only way around was over the hill to the west. I climbed it and decided that it was too risky to continue alone. This is looking south to where I came from: 29°16'14.11" N 113°59'33.79" W


Looking northwest up the wash that enters from the west: Same spot


It's too bad I didn't continue on as GE shows about a half km of green which looks fairly passable. Then the pools start again which, judging by this one, would not be passable by myself and without climbing gear. But it would have bee nice to see them. So I hung out here for a while and took pictures of hummingbirds and enjoyed the beautiful desert environment, without evidence of cattle:




I started worrying about the gear I had left behind so I decided to hike back and camp where I did the previous night.

[Edited on 1-22-2014 by Mark_BC]

[Edited on 2-6-2014 by Mark_BC]

David K - 1-22-2014 at 12:51 AM

Incredible country you were in! Amazing that what looks like a sandy canyon bottom was actually huge boulders you had to scramble over.

Salsipuedes means Get Out IF You Can... and like Erle Stanley Gardner wrote in his book Hovering Over Baja and Off the Beaten Track in Baja, it meant Get IN if you can... it is like a magnet.

I am glad you did get out okay... and as you saw, we were watching you, at least once a day.... biting our nails.

Thank you Mark!

Skipjack Joe - 1-22-2014 at 01:41 AM

Mark,

It would be helpful if you provided GPS readings with some of these images so that we could better understand how they relate to your journey.

Just a suggestion.

David K - 1-22-2014 at 01:56 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Mark,

It would be helpful if you provided GPS readings with some of these images so that we could better understand how they relate to your journey.

Just a suggestion.


Here is his Spot map, and perhaps he can say where the photos were taken in relation to the numbered darts? I have an idea because he mentions where the arroyo turns north (Spot 11)



On the topo:



The topo may be wrong as to the location of the Salsipuedes headwater. Mark may have been in the true Salsipuedes from the start, but the name on the map is off.

bkbend - 1-22-2014 at 10:18 AM

Disappointing to hear tamarisk has made it in there. Not good for the water supply in the drainage.

Mark_BC - 1-22-2014 at 11:50 AM

Yeah it's pretty incredible country. It's overwhelming when you are there, especially alone. But now that I'm getting more familiar with the area I am hoping to go back, maybe before it gets too hot. We'll see how work goes.

Is there a way to copy and paste the coordinates from GE? Up until now I've been manually copying them which is slow. Edit: figured it out: Ctrl Shift C

[Edited on 1-22-2014 by Mark_BC]

David K - 1-22-2014 at 10:32 PM

Looking forward to the map to compare Google Earth view and how it looks on the ground! Thanks Mark.

Skipjack Joe - 1-22-2014 at 11:11 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Is there a way to copy and paste the coordinates from GE? Up until now I've been manually copying them which is slow. Edit: figured it out: Ctrl Shift C

[Edited on 1-22-2014 by Mark_BC]


That's great because I didn't know either.

mtgoat666 - 1-22-2014 at 11:50 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC
Yeah it's pretty incredible country. It's overwhelming when you are there, especially alone. But now that I'm getting more familiar with the area I am hoping to go back, maybe before it gets too hot. We'll see how work goes.

Is there a way to copy and paste the coordinates from GE? Up until now I've been manually copying them which is slow. Edit: figured it out: Ctrl Shift C

[Edited on 1-22-2014 by Mark_BC]


Suggestion: Create labeled pts and lines in GE, create kml or kmz file, post file on your website. Post photos in GE using panoramio.

Mark_BC - 1-23-2014 at 12:18 AM

Is there a way to embed videos? I tried Youtube and Vimeo and couldn't get it to work. Here is using Photobucket but it doesn't embed, it seems to link. I guess that works too.



[Edited on 1-23-2014 by Mark_BC]

mtngoat: good idea. But I haven't been able to log into Panoramia for a while now, they switched emails or something. And it takes several weeks for the images to be approved and show up.

[Edited on 1-23-2014 by Mark_BC]

Hook - 1-23-2014 at 06:23 AM

Boy, that looks like some rough hiking. Congratulations on getting as far as you did.

But it will have to be in from the mouth by the sea for me, if I ever go. I prefer the sandy, palm-studded washes for hiking. Then, the occasional boulder scramble up the sides for the occasional view. That's too much rock for me.

The pics look rather cold to me. What do you figure your day time highs and overnight lows were?

Skipjack Joe - 1-23-2014 at 08:15 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Is there a way to embed videos? I tried Youtube and Vimeo and couldn't get it to work.



How to post a youtube video on nomads:

http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=43079

Make sure you remove the space (" ") from the demo url.

David K - 1-23-2014 at 09:45 AM

Mark, the Photobucket video test you posted works, but you have to tell folks to click on the still photo to activate the video, as there is no arrow to show it is a video link.

'El Vergel' took several short videos of the bubbling soda springs at El Volcan after our Lost Mission hike of 2011, and I posted them using Photobucket.

Skipjack Joe provided the link to how to use You Tube, which does leave an arrow on the screen so it is obviously a video link to click.

As always, we are here to help!

DosMars - 1-23-2014 at 11:24 AM

Awesome photos Mark! Too bad the timing didn't work out better. I just realized I'm about to tap out on my vacation hours... If you'd had more of a heads up from work it would have been great to rendezvous down there for another week to scout out that second roUte in from the dry lakes.

I'm going to use up a couple of days next weekend and do four days north of gonzagas.

Skipjack Joe - 1-23-2014 at 12:51 PM

Spectacular country!

It's no wonder that you were attracted to it. It's like Catavina without the highway. Even better.

Mark_BC - 1-23-2014 at 10:48 PM

Mark, the rental car was adding up every day... we'll see how work goes. If I get laid off I may try again but I want to go with one or more other people, and I don't want to bring a rental car down. My bike should be done soon.

David K - 1-23-2014 at 11:31 PM

Mark_BC, now that you are 'known' and shared your trip photos, etc., you should find it easier to find a Nomad who can toss your bike into his truck and drop you off... then when he is done fishing or surfing, to pick up up for the ride home... maybe???

woody with a view - 1-23-2014 at 11:41 PM

perhaps.... sure would be fun.

woody with a view - 1-24-2014 at 02:31 AM

"I started worrying about the gear I had left behind so I decided to hike back and camp where I did the previous night."

may i ask why you were worried about your gear. it doesn't look like people would be an issue in there?

Mark_BC - 1-24-2014 at 01:38 PM

I tied my bike up low down so if it started to rain half my stuff would have gotten washed away. And if anything had food smells on it animals could have gotten in.

Mostly irrational concerns I know, but I have discovered that's how I work. I take comfort in my material physical equipment when travelling and if I'm not in control of it and it's not in good order I get anxious.

woody with a view - 1-24-2014 at 01:39 PM

:light:

Mark_BC - 1-26-2014 at 11:05 PM

Just a couple photos from the next day. I decided to backtrack out and try from the east entrance. It would take a few days to get to Bay of LA so on my way back out I stopped to filter some water at the stream. I went up as far as I felt like going but there was still cow chit everywhere. I know the filter takes out multicellular organisms but not virsuses. I think cows are pretty clean but to be safe I added iodine tablets. This made the water taste really bad so I preferentially used my clean water. It turns out that my 22 liters of water lasted almost the whole of 7 days. It worked out to 3.5 liters per day. That's pretty good because I don't sweat much. If it was summer I'm sure I'd go through a lot more.

I went out a different way than when I came in. I followed the cow trails out and avoided the cliff. The exit is here: 29° 15.875' N 114° 0.914' W. It was a lot longer and harder than I expected because it has to wind all back and forth around the rock formations. To go 300 m probably took 1500 m of trail.

I took the trailer off and did it twice: once with the bike and once with the trailer. These shots are somewhere around 29° 15.685' N 114° 0.943' W





I'd encounter cows going back in as I was going out. They'd be a bit startled. With one I just waved her through and intuitively she knew what the wave meant and relaxed. Maybe I'm a cow whisperer...

It took all day to get out. I was worried it might start raining because it was really clouding over and I swear once I felt some drizzle. So I was racing to set up the tent. I forgot my Spot back near the first campsite I was going to set up in at the head of the canyon (decided that would be a bad idea if it started to rain!) so I rushed back before dark and in the process screwed up the derailleur somehow so I couldn't shift the rear gears. Here is where I ended up camping. I can't find my GPS but it was about here, with the cows in the background:
29° 15.493' N 114° 1.267' W


It was here that I learned a lesson I should have known before: don't bring a Thermarest to Mexico, it will just pop. There was lots of vegetation in that spot, with thorns inevitably on the ground. So I had a hard bed that night. I should have brought a regular foamy that can't pop.

Also, I left the zipper open with about a 6 inch slit and I turned on my flashlight for some reason not too long after dark and a big 4" stick insect somehow managed to get through the slit and was hanging on the inside of the tent!

It didn't rain and wasn't too windy. Tomorrow I'd see how far down the road I get.

Whale-ista - 1-27-2014 at 12:01 AM

Wow, what a great adventure! Thank you for posting photos. Love the hummingbird image. Beautiful countryside.

going solo was courageous, maybe on the return you can find some companions.

What water filter did you use? Too bad about the cows- iodine flavor is hard to mask. You will definitely need more water later in the year as it warms up. Maybe bring some of the electrolyte mixes or flavored powders to add in?

I look forward to your return.

Barry A. - 1-27-2014 at 10:10 AM

A really great report and photos. Your writing style and honesty is very refreshing, and I salute you for that. What an adventure------and what an Adventurer you are!!!

Thank you for sharing it with all of us. Nobody ever said that particular regional geography was "easy", and you appear to be proving that in spades!!! and your pictures reveal it--------just spectacular!!!

Barry

Neal Johns - 1-28-2014 at 12:10 PM

Next time - and I will never doubt you will do it again - I will try to be available to accompany/carry you to the end of the road even if there is another vehicle along. Always better to have two vehicles. I have been in the area before.

Neal Johns aridnealATgmaildotcom

Picture is my 4x4 Tacoma pop-top camper on Mission Santa Maria "Road".

DK Road to MSM [800x600].jpg - 39kB

Mark_BC - 1-29-2014 at 01:02 AM

Thanks Neal.

I'm uploading larger photos now. Here is a shot from the previous day with my GoPro mounted on the trailer looking forward. It is me pushing the bike over some rocks in the wash. I think it was here: 29° 16.161' N 114° 0.579' W



The next morning I explored a little bit around the area and went up some rocks to take panorama shots. These two shots are from the same spot.
29° 15.514' N 114° 1.310' W
Looking north:


Looking south-east:

In the above photo, the highest peak on the right is probably at this location: 29° 15.350' N 114° 0.940' W so you can see how GE really levels out the terrain! Basically, when you see rocky areas in GE you have to assume it's very steep even though the elevation information doesn't reveal that.

Looking south-east 29° 15.592' N 114° 1.203' W


You have to watch out for those chollas! They drop off chunks that start new cholla bushes but they'll go through the bike tire pretty easily. This was in the same vicinity.


I headed back down. I should have GPS'd the gate. But it is within a few hundred meters of my campsite, at most a km. I found a chisel on the road on the way up and forgot to see if it was Jimmy's when he came to see me. So I tied it to the gate ropes where the next person would see it.



Coyote and bike tracks:


I was expecting a mostly downhill ride back out but holy cow that road sure goes up and down a lot, I guess that's why it isn't straight! It seemed harder than coming in, but that's probably because I was expecting it to be downhill. I got a little confused when I saw more junctions than I remember coming in. When I left the hilly area and got to the straight sections I really flew. But I still couldn't change my rear gears so I put the chain in a middle cog and then had to get by with two gears corresponding to the two front chainrings -- low and medium. It worked OK.

The wind was blowing hard from the north so my plan was to turn south-east at the Y junction 2 km from the highway and high tail it over with a tail wind to the Desangano mine ruins to camp. That was a lot of fun rolling over the whoopdeedoos in the sandy track with the wind blowing from behind.

Somewhere around 29° 10.977' N 114° 5.772' W


Somewhere around 29° 8.261' N 114° 5.132' W looking north


Same spot:


I think this one was here:
29° 7.284' N 114° 2.494' W


29° 7.090' N 114° 2.240' W


Careful where you walk. I wonder how many cows have fallen in. 29° 6.981' N 114° 1.886' W


It was pretty windy and I set up camp in the most sheltered spot I could find behind a line of trees.

Skipjack Joe - 1-29-2014 at 06:51 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Careful where you walk. I wonder how many cows have fallen in. 29° 6.981' N 114° 1.886' W


It was pretty windy and I set up camp in the most sheltered spot I could find behind a line of trees.


This picture contains the remnants of the corner of a building that is all but gone. Maybe the Lost Mission?

That should perk up DK's ears. :lol::lol:

Skipjack Joe - 1-29-2014 at 07:12 AM

I love those panorama shots. That's some fine country in there.

Barry A. - 1-29-2014 at 09:27 AM

Picture #4 "looking south" shows what appears to be an old jeep-type track-------------is it actually a veh. 2-track ??

Barry

David K - 1-29-2014 at 01:51 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Careful where you walk. I wonder how many cows have fallen in. 29° 6.981' N 114° 1.886' W


It was pretty windy and I set up camp in the most sheltered spot I could find behind a line of trees.


This picture contains the remnants of the corner of a building that is all but gone. Maybe the Lost Mission?

That should perk up DK's ears. :lol::lol:


It is the remains of one of the houses at El Desengaño (gold mine from early 1900's-1930's)... maybe a bit after. In 1967, I saw several standing adobes here. The Baja Adventure Book says there is a Model A or ? down one of the mine shafts!

TMW - 1-29-2014 at 04:09 PM

Beautiful pictures and country, thanks.

Mark_BC - 1-29-2014 at 10:03 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Barry A.
Picture #4 "looking south" shows what appears to be an old jeep-type track-------------is it actually a veh. 2-track ??

Barry


It goes into what looked like a paddock. It looks like from GE there is another road just beyond there. There are a few tracks going various places, it would be interesting to explore them.

Camp in morning:


The next morning I headed over to the highway. The road got sandy but the bike can handle it. On the final wash, however, before reaching the highway, the track was very sandy with deep wheel ruts. That made it too hard to ride, not because the wheels were sinking in, but because at low speed you have to turn the wheel back and forth to maintain balance, but that was hitting the sides of the ruts and causing me to lose momentum. Even the motorbike tracks suggested they were having trouble.

Next two shots somewhere around here: 29° 4.149' N 114° 0.512' W
Looking north:


Looking south:


At the highway I saw this buzzard:


When I got to the highway I did something foolish and pulled out the thorns from the front tire. Of course they started hissing when I did that so I had to change the tube, and make sure that any other thorns in the tire were removed. Next time I'll use the Stan's puncture sealing goo. I didn't have time to sort that out this time.
29° 3.703' N 113° 59.967' W


I went down the highway which seemed very slow, almost slower than the sandy tracks. Maybe not, but it was much more pleasant riding off road. I wish I had loaded more GE into the cache of my iPhone beforehand because it turns out there are a lot more tracks in this area which would have allowed me to avoid the highway for quite a ways. In TW's recent trip report, he went up to Yubay, and there is actually a road leading from way up near Salsipedes that goes right by Yubay. It branches off the Salsipuedes road here: 29° 14.768' N 114° 1.248' W and goes by Yubay in this vicinity: 29° 12.450' N 114° 0.579' W. And then the road continues towards Bay of LA here: 29° 4.628' N 113° 57.989' W but eventually you have to go on the highway before you get to the dry lakes.

This bike is great for riding through the desert. I could go about half the speed you'd go in a vehicle and in some ways it offers even more freedom because it's easy to get over rough spots and you don't have to worry about 3000 lb of metal breaking down and leaving you stranded. I can haul a week's worth of water with me so I'd love to explore more of these areas by bike. Just have to spend more time on GE now.

Approaching the dry lake:




I was hoping to turn off at the turnoff to Mission de San Borja but there wasn't much cover there. I was getting really tired and run down from running the big fat tires with low pressure on the highway. I continued on a couple more km and pushed the bike 100 m off highway through the desert to find a nice spot in a little wash:
Somewhere around: 28° 58.488' N 113° 43.026' W


That night the coyotes came by around midnight. They were on either side of my tent yipping, probably a few hundred feet away but they sure sounded close. I was freaking out; they sound terrifying. But afterwards I checked the internet and serious attacks on adults are basically unheard of so I was safe.

A few other cholla species to be wary of:


This is the water pipe supplying Bay of LA from a well at the dry lake. I wonder what happens if a car goes off the road and breaks it...
28° 58.434' N 113° 36.254' W


It only took an hour or so to get to the final descent into Bay of LA. 28° 58.879' N 113° 34.916' W


Another shot of a buzzard, at Villa Bahia:


I got in with half a litre of water left! I was going to re-organize for a couple days and then go up the dry lakes and hike in to Salsipuedes from the eastern side to see what the terrain was like there. I didn't have the time or food to actually go down, it would just be a scoping mission.

[Edited on 1-30-2014 by Mark_BC]

bkbend - 1-29-2014 at 11:02 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

This is the water pipe supplying Bay of LA from a well at the dry lake. I wonder what happens if a car goes off the road and breaks it...



Long lines to get water at the spring in town.

[Edited on 1-30-2014 by bkbend]

David K - 1-30-2014 at 10:36 AM

Thank you Mark... Perfect report and it is so appreciated that you are sharing your adventure with us. The ability to have water for a week using that trailer is surely what makes this kind of travel in those Baja locations possible... along with your youth and strength!

Have you considered doing sections of El Camino Real, perhaps the places where it is mostly level?

Mark_BC - 1-30-2014 at 04:02 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by David K
Have you considered doing sections of El Camino Real, perhaps the places where it is mostly level?

I haven't but will look into it. I am always looking for multi-day expeditions to go on. If you want a great blog of a bike tourer check out Cass Gilbert's While Out Riding. I did a 2 week tour of the Indian Himalayas with him several years ago and he basically spends his life riding his bike.

OK, last set of pictures ... I decided to try driving the car up the dry lakebeds to where I'd start hiking up to the pass in from the east. I checked it out the previous June in the 40 degree heat so knew exactly what to expect.

Donkeys in the first dry lake bed.


After the first lakebed the ground gets more rocky and moonscape-like. Around 29° 5.319' N 113° 45.352' W


I made it across from the first to second lakebeds. The road isn't too challenging but the ground clearance of the car was very low so I had to stop every 50 m and move rocks off the road. But I got through OK. I was worried about the sandy sections later on but it was good. If I got into trouble coming back I'd just turn around and go backwards so the front wheel drive turns into rear wheel drive.




There are a few isolated cactus growing in the middle of nowhere in the lakebeds.


Campsite: 29° 16.289' N 113° 50.632' W


That night I slept in the back seat of the car.


The next morning I got ready to head across. I was going to ride to the island on the left, then ditch the bike at 29° 16.003' N 113° 52.279' W and hike the rest of the way to the saddle left of the mountain in the middle. Over that saddle is inside the Salsipuedes drainage.


Another view of where I was going:

I crossed a faint jeep track about 100 m before the island, which you can actually see in GE. I left the bike on the north side of the island and got my hiking gear together.

What it was like hiking across the lakebed:


A raven came by and sat in a cactus to watch me go by. Not sure if he was just curious or waiting for me to die... I stashed two water bottles along the way, burying them. I went past a clam shell, don't know what the story was behind that. Maybe a fresh water one from when this was a lake?


The hike was so gradual I didn't notice the elevation gain of 300 m. It was pretty easy and I got to the base of the steep section and set up camp:
Somewhere around 29° 15.304' N 113° 55.795' W


Good to see there are lots of bees in Baja. There was a lot of life here, it was really pretty desert country.




And looking across to the hill here: 29° 15.334' N 113° 55.214' W I could see switchbacks, I guessed from antelope.


That night I got really worried about the car and my bike. I noticed a slow leak in one of the car tires and I left the bike pump with my bike, along with the tire changing equipment. So if someone stole the bike I could be screwed. And maybe the insurance didn't cover the car if it's so far away from the highway (40 km). I decided to haul it up the hill the next morning to assess the pass and get back to my stuff quickly.

This is what the climb looked like. It was about 45 degrees most of the way with loose rocks and agaves to stab your legs if you're not careful. I was heading straight up to the right. Around 29° 15.199' N 113° 56.026' W




After the first hill it mellowed out a little bit and continued on to the saddle. Looking north-east back to the dry lake:




At the saddle! Looking north-west towards the mountain: Around 29° 14.949' N 113° 56.488' W


And the shot we've all been waiting for: looking west to the upper Salsipuedes drainage. The terrain there is pretty mellow and I could have continued fairly easily but I wanted to get back to the car. It looks like from GE it doesn't get a little challenging until a few km in.


At the time I thought, OK I can hike up but there's no way you could get a bike up. In thinking back, it may be possible. You'd just have to bring lots of water which you stash at the bottom of the hill (also leave lots of extra to allow you to ride back out if you need to), preferably go with other people, and get your gear sorted out so you can throw it on your back for hiking it up. Then plan for two days to get all your gear up to the pass in stages. I am good at climbing hills so I could probably do it, except my knees don't like going down so with all the stages I might twist a knee. You'd just have to be really careful and slow.

I went back down pretty fast, but carefully. I packed up and hiked back across the lakebed. As soon as I got within range I took some telephoto shots of the island to see if the bike was OK:

Whew! That littlle blue dot left of center. And the car was still white too. I was being a little paranoid since no one had come by, but it would have been easy to follow my tracks and take the bike. In retrospect I could have ridden it all the way up to the campsite with ease.

The rest of the day I relaxed at the car and prepared to drive back out the next morning.





On the way back I zoomed around the salt flats and got some good videos. But you have to be careful of the potholes! Somewhere around 29° 14.327' N 113° 50.908' W


This is at the southern lake, almost back at the highway. Around 29° 3.412' N 113° 46.737' W


So in retrospect I wish I hadn't taken the car up the dry lakes, it was causing me too much worry. It would have been easy to ride the bike in, it's only 40 km which is an easy day on those flat roads. Just get someone to drive you up the highway. And the other problem with the rental car was that each day was burning up money, so I didn't want to commit to another couple weeks for another attempt down the canyon. Next time I'll catch a ride or take the bus. But still, this was a great scouting trip and I'm going to come back as soon as I can organize it to try again, otherwise it'll have to wait until the autumn when it cools down.

Skipjack Joe - 1-30-2014 at 06:03 PM

These last group of images are your best in my opinion. I especially like the moon shot.

Have you considered entering Salsipuedes from the lake just a mile north of where you came in.

29°16'2.18"N 113°55'55.68"W

I think the climb north from this spot would have been less severe.

Mark_BC

Frigatebird - 1-30-2014 at 06:34 PM

Mark,
Check your U2U private messages.

Neal Johns - 1-30-2014 at 06:40 PM

The most outstanding trip report and pictures I have seen!

Wish I were 100 years younger. :lol::lol::lol:
Neal

woody with a view - 1-30-2014 at 06:53 PM

yeah Mark, one of the best reports EVER here!

i'd be onboard next time with enough planning to take you to the launch area and maybe stay a night so you could place some water/supplies along your route. sounds like a great adventure to be a part of.

TMW - 1-30-2014 at 08:41 PM

Wow some really beautiful pictures. The Baja landscape can be so beautiful yet so dangerous.

David K - 1-30-2014 at 08:48 PM

In one word: SWEET!

Central Baja is just so great. Thank you Mark, we rarely get such a view of our planet... Planet Baja! :bounce::bounce::bounce:

Edit: The sea shell was likely from the Cochimí (specially if far from auto roads).

I have seen sea shells way way far from the sea, that were not (yet) petrified.

[Edited on 1-31-2014 by David K]

Neal Johns - 1-31-2014 at 12:18 AM

Mark,
I can also hang with Woody for a couple of days wherever we dump you. :lol:

We will have lots of water that you can bury just in case of a retreat.

Also will give you a handheld two-way radio which should work to contact us for a mile or two. We can probably arrange for boaters that have a FRS/GMRS radio to listen for you if they are near the mouth of Salsipuedes.
Neal

Skipjack Joe - 1-31-2014 at 12:27 AM

I agree. These are real nice images. They are very inspirational.

Mark_BC - 2-2-2014 at 10:46 AM

Thanks for all the support guys! I still have tons of video to go through, which would also make some good photos if I took screen shots. I'll try to sort that out over the not too distant future.

Also, someone asked what filter I was using, it is the Sweetwater Guardian. A plastic thing that I would like to replace. The desalinator filter was the Katadyn Survivor 06.

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Have you considered entering Salsipuedes from the lake just a mile north of where you came in.
29°16'2.18"N 113°55'55.68"W

I think the climb north from this spot would have been less severe.


Hey Skipjack, I thought about that one but it looks pretty hairy entering the main canyon here: 29° 17.237' N 113° 57.989' W

Based on previous experience, if it looks at all rough on GE, it probably is very rough! But maybe with multiple people and climbing gear it would be do-able.

David K - 2-2-2014 at 11:40 AM

Thank you Mark... I wish there were more off road adventure trip reports like yours! Love them all...

Skipjack Joe - 2-2-2014 at 01:55 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Have you considered entering Salsipuedes from the lake just a mile north of where you came in.
29°16'2.18"N 113°55'55.68"W

I think the climb north from this spot would have been less severe.


Hey Skipjack, I thought about that one but it looks pretty hairy entering the main canyon here: 29° 17.237' N 113° 57.989' W

Based on previous experience, if it looks at all rough on GE, it probably is very rough! But maybe with multiple people and climbing gear it would be do-able.


Ah yes, I saw that area as well. It looks like heavy boulders barricading the wash across the canyon. Didn't know how hard it would be to get past a couple of such spots on that arm.

Ateo - 2-2-2014 at 02:13 PM

WONDERFUL PHOTOS! GREAT TRIP!

Barry A. - 2-2-2014 at 02:20 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Have you considered entering Salsipuedes from the lake just a mile north of where you came in.
29°16'2.18"N 113°55'55.68"W

I think the climb north from this spot would have been less severe.


Hey Skipjack, I thought about that one but it looks pretty hairy entering the main canyon here: 29° 17.237' N 113° 57.989' W

Based on previous experience, if it looks at all rough on GE, it probably is very rough! But maybe with multiple people and climbing gear it would be do-able.


Ah yes, I saw that area as well. It looks like heavy boulders barricading the wash across the canyon. Didn't know how hard it would be to get past a couple of such spots on that arm.


I am still very curious about the reported guys that came up Salsipuedes from the sea and ended up on Botica Dry lake, but not via Botica Canyon as ESG and crew did.?!?!?!?!? Am I getting confused here? Was that not reported by the BOLA guys??

Barry

Skipjack Joe - 2-2-2014 at 02:32 PM

Don't mean to insult your intelligence and you most likely know this, but ...

If you zoom in close to the ground in google earth and then tilt your viewpoint forward using the topmost circle with the N on it. You can then move forward at a constant elevation and see your intended journey at a height of, say, 50 feet.

You indicated that the real world looks very different than GE. Perhaps that's because you are always looking straight down.

Mark_BC - 2-2-2014 at 10:11 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Barry A.
I am still very curious about the reported guys that came up Salsipuedes from the sea and ended up on Botica Dry lake, but not via Botica Canyon as ESG and crew did.?!?!?!?!? Am I getting confused here? Was that not reported by the BOLA guys??

Barry


I wonder if they came up this arm and then hopped east over to Botica Wash:
29°20'23.06" N 113°56'56.36" W

Mark_BC - 2-2-2014 at 10:28 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
Don't mean to insult your intelligence and you most likely know this, but ...

If you zoom in close to the ground in google earth and then tilt your viewpoint forward using the topmost circle with the N on it. You can then move forward at a constant elevation and see your intended journey at a height of, say, 50 feet.

You indicated that the real world looks very different than GE. Perhaps that's because you are always looking straight down.


Oh yeah I look at it from all angles. That location goes down almost 100 m over about 500 m so that is a 5:1 slope which would probably mean a lot of cliffs with the big rocks you can see on GE.

Some of the areas I went to showed hardly any hill at all but in reality it was very steep. Basically, if you see rocky terrain in GE you should expect it to be very steep.

The second route I tried in looks more reasonable (once you get up the hill) because most of the way isn't rocky, it's more typical desert terrain that you can walk through. You can see the big bushes on GE and the terrain is quite flat meaning the few areas that look a bit sketchy in the wash could likely be hiked around by leaving the wash if needed.

Mark_BC - 2-5-2014 at 10:25 PM

OK so I edited the previous posts and added coordinates where I could remember or place the photo.

Mark_BC - 2-17-2014 at 04:46 PM

Well it looks like work is slowing down again and I should have the opportunity to try the Salsipuedes descent again, this time older and wiser. I am thinking that I may head down in the next few weeks. I am not going to rent a car, that was too much of a noose around my neck. I am hoping to catch a ride if one is available. I’ll pay for gas etc. All you’d have to do is drop me off at the side of the highway…

This time I will try a different approach. I am not going to try to go down the whole drainage from headwaters to sea like last time because it is too difficult on a first descent trip by myself. Instead I’ll go in halfway down the canyon from Botica lakebed. It would be a better story to do the whole canyon, but I’d rather be able to finish the loop.

There are a few areas that look a little sketchy, like between these two locations:
29°19'22.74" N 113°58'40.57" W
And 29°20'24.43" N 113°59'25.66" W

I don’t want to get down the canyon and find that it’s impassable again.
So I will ride my bike up the dry lakebeds from the BoLA highway to where I got last time with the car, but then go over towards ESG’s campsite and hike up the hill at the place where Eidsco has a photo on GE. From this photo you can also see that the hills aren’t too steep.
29°18'50.19" N 113°54'09.58" W

Then I hike north a bit and then turn west and cross over the lakebed into the drainage via this modest hill:
29°19'46.36" N 113°56'36.67" W

From there it’s pretty straightforward another 23 km down the wash out to the sea. I don’t see anything on GE that is a cause for concern, and once I get to Larry’s photo on GE, I know I’m home free because if he got there on quads I’m sure a bike could get through! What I’ll also do once I enter the main drainage is turn left and go back up to see how far I can get before the terrain gets too rough. That would help with planning future descents down the whole drainage if anyone ever decides to try that.

I will have to take all my water, so planning on around 30 L, which should last over week. On one hand, it will be warmer this time, but on the other it won’t be such hard work as last time.

Once I get to the sea I only need to packraft down to Candelero. From there I can ride up the wash but to avoid backtracking down the lakebeds I plan to take a nicer route and cross this pass here which leads down into Bahia Guadalupe:
29°16'16.47" N 113°45'38.72" W

From Guadalupe I can ride south and go up this wash which leads to a small road:
29°07'46.31" N 113°37'19.63" W

This road goes all the way back to la Gringa.

I’ve been sick almost the whole time since I got back, with the flu / bronchitis but hopefully it should soon clear up. So crossing fingers that nothing will come up to keep me away this time.

BTW, I have been going through my video footage from the first trip and some of it turned out really well! If I get more of that on this next trip I’ll definitely have something to make a movie out of. But I need a good story to make a movie, and getting turned back by difficult rocks isn’t a good story.

Barry A. - 2-17-2014 at 05:58 PM

Sounds like a very workable plan, Mark. We will 'stay tuned'.

Many years ago I could never figure out how to drive directly (or even indirectly) from La Gringa to Guadelupe Bay beaches, but maybe you can hopefully find one.

Barry

David K - 2-17-2014 at 06:34 PM

Hi Mark,

I recently found that BING satellite images are newer and higher resolution than Google Earth... straight down views... You might check it out to explore routes while you are getting over your flu. SEE this thread I made with comparison photos: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=72226

Mark_BC - 2-17-2014 at 10:22 PM

Barry, I traced the road from la Gringa to Guadalupe with a Google Earth kmz file, you can U2U me and I'll send it. It gets very faint up at the Guadalupe end but it definitely enters that wash from the coordinates I gave in the last post. I guess I'll scope it out to see what kind of a vehicle can get through. It may be only quad-passable.

David, thanks those are nice images. They seem about the same resolution as the high quality GE images but for areas where GE is low rez they will definitely help out. Doesn't appear to be elevation data though so you can't tilt to get a sense of the terrain.

soulpatch - 2-17-2014 at 10:44 PM

I drove north out of La Gringa a few years ago hoping to get up there but everything got to the point that something narrower than my Rodeo could get through.
Be awesome to find the right road sometime!

Skipjack Joe - 2-18-2014 at 07:17 AM

Quote:


I don’t want to get down the canyon and find that it’s impassable again.
So I will ride my bike up the dry lakebeds from the BoLA highway to where I got last time with the car, but then go over towards ESG’s campsite and hike up the hill at the place where Eidsco has a photo on GE. From this photo you can also see that the hills aren’t too steep.
29°18'50.19" N 113°54'09.58" W



This looks like a difficult area to me. It will be interesting to see what you think of it.

larryC - 2-18-2014 at 08:58 AM

Mark
Once you make it to Botica dry lake the only rough spot you will encounter is the 40' cliff that ESG had to lower his packjacks over. Once past that it is smooth sailing. Have fun.
Larry

TMW - 2-18-2014 at 01:12 PM

The Bill Nichols motorcycle trail goes from LA Bay to the Bahia Guadalupe area. Here is a GE view of it. I'm sure there are a couple of places a 4 wheeler can't get thru.


Neal Johns - 2-20-2014 at 12:59 AM

Mark,
The below coordinate does not look right when plotted on GE. Could it be a mistake?

Quote:

Then I hike north a bit and then turn west and cross over the lakebed into the drainage via this modest hill: 29°19'46.36" N 113°56'36.67" W

Mark_BC - 2-20-2014 at 09:46 AM

Yes that's the right coordinate. If you tilt GE you see that the hills north of that spot are a little steep, so that is the easiest entry point I think. I'd go up from the lakebed via this little wash:
29°20'34.89" N 113°55'47.74" W

I was also looking around and it looks like Asamblea would be an interesting but more challenging trip. You'd enter here from the road:
29°17'54.59" N 114°01'33.52" W

The next few km after that look the most challenging, so if you make it through that you are probably OK. It would be a long twisty journey, it must be like being in one of those hedge mazes that never ends.

There is an oasis here:
29°22'57.08" N 113°58'17.80" W

Then when you get here turn left:
29°25'18.04" N 113°56'28.68" W

Follow this wash up until here and turn north and cross into the next drainage:
29°26'09.94" N 113°58'41.48" W

Then follow this to the sea:
29°31'11.53" N 113°55'55.29" W

From there you could packraft up to the Calamajue area and ride out, or make your way over to Punta Final.

But first I want to get down Salsipuedes!

Mark_BC - 3-17-2014 at 01:59 PM

OK, it's on. I fly to Las Vegas on Thursday and Mark will give me a ride to San Diego where John Mcfrog is giving me a ride down. We leave Friday early am then drive non-stop to the BoLA turnoff, and camp around the Mission San Borja road. Then Saturday I'll say goodbye and head off up the dry lakebed. I hope to get all the way to ESG's campsite that day, it is 40 km which should be do-able if there is no headwind.
29°18'13.47" N 113°54'13.66" W
Then the next day, Sunday, I'll hike my stuff up the hill, 150 m so shouldn't be too bad. Then I'll ride west into Salsipuedes from the Botica lakebed. Once I'm in the wash I will make a B line for this corner here which looks like a cliff:
29°22'14.13" N 113°57'04.09" W
If it's passable then I know I'll be home free because I don't see any other obstacles up until Larry's photo, and if he got there with quads then I can get down with a bike. Then I can commit to going down and not have to worry about getting stuck and running out of water.

After I confirm that corner is passable I'll go back up the main Salsipuedes canyon and see how far I can get. Then I'll head back down to the confluence with the Asamblea. I'd like to go up that one as far as I can as well. I'm also intrigued about the overland crossing to the next drainage north...

So we'll see how it goes, I'll figure it out once I'm in there. I think I should be able to do a lot of exploration since it isn't hard to ride 20 km a day if it's just sandy with no rocks. So I should be able to go all over that canyon network in fairly good time.

It's going to be quite a bit hotter this time so I'll have to be careful with water. I am going to lug a ton of it over from the highway and stash at the bottom of the hill at ESG's campsite, shouldn't be too hard to do since it is a flat road. I'm a little unsure though how to determine if the water I might find from an oasis has mineral contamination. I'd like to go up to that oasis up Asamblea, if I could find water there that would be awesome, it would really provide a nice buffer of safety.
29°22'57.02" N 113°58'18.21" W

Then in mid-April Mark and Morgan and the gang will come down to Guadalupe where I'll meet them and hang out for a few days and then go back with them! Not sure if I'll take a break after a couple weeks and resupply in Bay of LA or not, or if I'll just spend a whole month out there. My food will run out after 2 weeks so I'd have to survive on fish. Can't complain about that!

motoged - 3-17-2014 at 03:29 PM

Quote:
Originally posted by TW
The Bill Nichols motorcycle trail goes from LA Bay to the Bahia Guadalupe area. ....


Tdubbya,
Is that the Window Rock Trail?

woody with a view - 3-17-2014 at 04:51 PM

how do you protect you stash of water from coyotes and other critters?

larryC - 3-18-2014 at 07:35 AM

Mark
You won't have any trouble going down the Botica dry wash, easy, sand and a gentle down slope until you get to the cliff near the bottom. Once down the cliff it is pretty simple over to the entrance to Salsipuedes and then the first branch to the right is Asamblea. If you take the branch to the right you end up at the ranches where you started your last trip. You know what obsticles to expect up there. If you go up Salsipuedes you will end up at the Botica dry lake and you will again be in familiar territory. Trying to travel along the coast from the mouth of salsipuedes on down to Guadalupe will be rugged. there will be lots of boats fishing in the area so some help will probably be available. Good luck and keep us posted.
Larry

JohnMcfrog - 3-18-2014 at 07:01 PM

Thanks to David K for some good info. Getting stoaked for this trip with Mark. Life is definitely good.

JohnMcfrog - 3-18-2014 at 07:07 PM

One more of the last details. Is the gas sold by venders at Catavina generally ok?

woody with a view - 3-18-2014 at 08:02 PM

it is generally ok. FWIW!

David K - 3-18-2014 at 10:28 PM

The gasoline and diesel sold out of Jerry cans at Cataviña comes from the Baja Cactus Pemex station in El Rosario. There are two Pemex stations in L.A. Bay, so top off there and El Rosario.

Mark_BC - 3-18-2014 at 10:41 PM

Hey Woody, I bury it. But it is a bit dangerous to rely on a stash because if they find it then you could be in trouble. So maybe better to carry it all with me.

Thanks Larry, looking forward to retracing your tracks! I'll keep an eye out for Indian paintings in areas where it looks habitable like around oases. I have to say, I'm intrigued by what Asamblea will be like. If I can actually ride most of it, that will be one long, twisted journey. You could go crazy if you didn't have a map and didn't know where you were. Curve after curve after curve.

Thanks for the support John! Everything is coming together, all my stuff is sorted out in various piles, now just have to pack it all up! I'll send you some kmz files.

Thanks David for all your advice!

David K - 3-18-2014 at 10:47 PM

As before, have a fantastic adventure, and I will happily post your Spot maps or anything else you would like of me, that I can do!

Mark_BC - 3-18-2014 at 10:50 PM

Here is my bike I am using, a Surly Pugsley. No derailleur to get hung up, this one is internally geared.

[img][/img]

Loaded front:

[img][/img]

[Edited on 3-30-2014 by BajaNomad]

 Pages:  1    3    5