BajaNomad

pez o pescado?

pauldavidmena - 7-27-2016 at 03:58 PM

I've seen two Spanish words used fairly commonly for "fish (noun)", "pez" and "pescado". Can they be used interchangeably, or is there a distinction between the two usages?

Howard - 7-27-2016 at 04:44 PM

First off, I speak basic Spanglish and am not fluent in the language. In my small world, the only reference I have heard and used the word pez was in reference to a specific species such as "pez gallo", (rooster fish) pez vela, (Sail Fish) etc.

Look forward to someone who really knows the difference.

David K - 7-27-2016 at 04:47 PM

Pez is a fish that is alive.
Pescado is a fish that has been caught.

pauldavidmena - 7-27-2016 at 05:39 PM

Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Pez is a fish that is alive.
Pescado is a fish that has been caught.


That would actually made sense to me, as "ado" is usually the prefix for the past participle. Thanks!

David K - 7-27-2016 at 05:48 PM

I am sure if that is incorrect, there are the few here who would love to say I am wrong! LOL

I am not a 100% Spanish speaker, but the Pez/ Pescado explanation is one I was told long ago.

DENNIS - 7-27-2016 at 05:58 PM


I spend most all of my days at Ivan Villarino's sport fishing establishment, and I've never even once heard the word "pez".
I believe the word has an archaic Castilian history.

pauldavidmena - 7-27-2016 at 06:09 PM

Quote: Originally posted by DENNIS  

I spend most all of my days at Ivan Villarino's sport fishing establishment, and I've never even once heard the word "pez".
I believe the word has an archaic Castilian history.


I'm familiar with this "pez".


DENNIS - 7-27-2016 at 06:14 PM



Yep. That's the only Pez left standing. :biggrin:

pauldavidmena - 7-27-2016 at 06:19 PM

On the other hand, it's funny that you mention the Castilian connection. My uncle married a Madrid native, who uses the word "pez" to describe fish. Very confusing for a Puerto Rican trying to learn the nuances of Mexican Spanish.

Jack Swords - 7-27-2016 at 07:21 PM

One year when I collected salt-water tropical fish off the Yucatan, my paperwork for the Mexican gov't needed to be redone as I had used the word pescado, which imparts a whole different meaning when importing these live fish up to the USA. I had to redo the paperwork to use "pez". Each state I passed through (mostly) reviewed the paperwork.

Osprey - 7-27-2016 at 07:24 PM

Now that Pablo has the real lowdown; dead vs alive, anyone want to chime in on English? When do we use fishes?

pauldavidmena - 7-27-2016 at 07:26 PM

I've learned that seafood words in particular are extremely regional, and that a perfectly innocuous word in one Latin American country could cause an international incident elsewhere. This song, by two Colombian brothers, is a great illustration.

[Edited on 7-28-2016 by pauldavidmena]

mtgoat666 - 7-27-2016 at 08:04 PM

Quote: Originally posted by DENNIS  

I spend most all of my days at Ivan Villarino's sport fishing establishment,...


Never been there. Is it a happenin' hang out?

Skipjack Joe - 7-27-2016 at 08:54 PM

Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Pez is a fish that is alive.
Pescado is a fish that has been caught.


I believe this is correct. My wife is Peruvian and a stickler for speaking correctly, and she corrected me long ago on the difference between the two. Gringos invariably call all fish pescados and Mexicans never correct them.

SFandH - 7-27-2016 at 09:27 PM

pez/pescado

cow/beef

pig/pork

along those lines according to a reference I just read. Makes sense.

Howard - 7-27-2016 at 09:45 PM

OK then, what is the Spanish word for Rooster fish?

In Loreto when the captain sees or wants to go for Roosters he calls them Pez Gallo. Uses the same word, pez, for some other species.

[Edited on 7-28-2016 by Howard]

BajaBlanca - 7-28-2016 at 06:32 AM

pez is alive and pescado is dead, ready to be cooked.

David K - 7-28-2016 at 07:01 AM

Quote: Originally posted by Howard  
OK then, what is the Spanish word for Rooster fish?

In Loreto when the captain sees or wants to go for Roosters he calls them Pez Gallo. Uses the same word, pez, for some other species.

[Edited on 7-28-2016 by Howard]


Does one say "Pescado Gallo" when a Pez Gallo is cooked? :?::D :lol:

nandopedal - 7-28-2016 at 11:08 AM

Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Pez is a fish that is alive.
Pescado is a fish that has been caught.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!....Ah, ahem, it's that how it goes?
I will help with the Spanish, you guys help me with English, ha,ha
Ok back to the original channel, Yes that is correct DK.


[Edited on 7-28-2016 by nandopedal]

AKgringo - 7-28-2016 at 11:33 AM

And then there is the difference between 'pescador' (catches fish), and 'pescadero' (sells fish)

Skipjack Joe - 7-28-2016 at 02:39 PM

Quote: Originally posted by SFandH  
pez/pescado

cow/beef

pig/pork

along those lines according to a reference I just read. Makes sense.


Don't forget corn beef.

David K - 7-28-2016 at 04:35 PM

turkey= guajolote/pavo (living/ cooked)

David K - 7-28-2016 at 05:21 PM

Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
turkey= guajolote/pavo (living/ cooked)
Meh?

.


Very interesting... thanks!
My helpers (from Oaxaca mostly) have schooled me on the living/ cooked explanation. Maybe they didn't know?

gsbotanico - 7-28-2016 at 08:58 PM

David K. had it right at the beginning: pez is the living fish and pecado is the caught and served fish. This is standard in Mexico and all the Central and South American countries I've visited. Of course, there are sometimes regionalisms. And it's important that the native speaker be reasonably well educated.

If asking a waiter in a restaurant, the question always is "¿Cual clase de pecado hay?" Frequently the answer is simply, "Pescado blanco." But it can be "pez espada" because this is the name of the living fish. Or it can be huachinango, cabrilla, or lenguado because these are the names of the living fish.

roldanojr - 8-30-2016 at 02:39 PM

An small correction:

'pescador' (catches fish) fisher man

"Pescadero" a person who sell fish

"Pescaderia" Seafood market.


David K - 8-30-2016 at 02:44 PM

Quote: Originally posted by roldanojr  
An small correction:

'pescador' (catches fish) fisher man

"Pescadero" a person who sell fish

"Pescaderia" Seafood market.



That's great!
Welcome to Nomad!

AKgringo - 8-30-2016 at 03:05 PM

So in the case of a fisherman, selling fish from his boat, would that be a pescadoreroia?

Just kidding! I was reading a Mexican news article that had been auto translated to English, and it came up with "Fish Monger" for the community of Pescadero. La Paz was just called "Peace".

I would like to extend a second welcome to the forum!

pauldavidmena - 8-30-2016 at 03:12 PM

"Fish Monger" just doesn't have the same musical quality as "Pescadero", which is also why I like saying "zanahoria" much more than I do eating carrots.