BajaNomad

laser surgery for hernia? UPDATE 2/8

BajaBlanca - 1-27-2018 at 02:55 PM

Has anyone had a stomach hernia surgery done via laser? Les has one that needs doing...

[Edited on 2-8-2018 by BajaBlanca]

bajaguy - 1-27-2018 at 04:28 PM

Had mine done with the DaVinci robotic in 2012. Minimally invasive, no problems.

Check with Sharp Medical Center to see if they do laser and if Les is a good candidate

BajaBlanca - 1-27-2018 at 05:21 PM

There is a doc in La Paz who does it. Fast recovery bajaguy?

bajabuddha - 1-27-2018 at 05:55 PM

Blanca, there are many different types of hernias. Is it a good ol' fashioned inguinal hernia? From what little I just googled, it's done by laparoscope which is less invasive than the old surgical method, but restrictions apply. You need to find out what Les is qualified to receive, although you probably already have. I suggest Google it and get to a board that has blogs on recovery, etc. Buena Suerte.

BajaBlanca - 1-27-2018 at 07:44 PM

thanks bb

Les is doing the googling but I like to hear from those who have been there and done that. Nothing like hearing it from the horse's mouth and most of us have been around the block, once or more times LOL

bajaguy - 1-27-2018 at 08:28 PM

Up and walking the next day, weight restrictions on lifting things for a couple of weeks, good as new after a few weeks. Can't remember any pain involved, two very minor incisions.....was for a Hiatal Hernia


Quote: Originally posted by BajaBlanca  
There is a doc in La Paz who does it. Fast recovery bajaguy?

Howard - 1-27-2018 at 08:31 PM

Here is an option, trade him in on a newer model! :biggrin:


DianaT - 1-27-2018 at 08:35 PM

Blanca,,

Be sure to check your U2U

Santiago - 1-28-2018 at 09:52 AM

Quote: Originally posted by bajabuddha  
Blanca, there are many different types of hernias. Is it a good ol' fashioned inguinal hernia? From what little I just googled, it's done by laparoscope which is less invasive than the old surgical method, but restrictions apply. You need to find out what Les is qualified to receive, although you probably already have. I suggest Google it and get to a board that has blogs on recovery, etc. Buena Suerte.

Blanca mentioned "Stomach" so probably not inguinal. More like BG's type I think.

BajaBlanca - 1-28-2018 at 08:48 PM

Thanks all! Les has been busy googling. All I can say is that he is quite wary now. Someone in town mentioned laser but laparoscopy sounds more like it.

bajaguy - 1-28-2018 at 09:23 PM

Check with Sharp in San Diego and see if they have DiVinci


Quote: Originally posted by BajaBlanca  
Thanks all! Les has been busy googling. All I can say is that he is quite wary now. Someone in town mentioned laser but laparoscopy sounds more like it.

pacificobob - 1-29-2018 at 02:51 PM

i do not often require medical advice, but when i do, baja nomad is my first stop.

BajaBlanca - 1-29-2018 at 06:59 PM

We find we need medical advice more and more often as time goes on.

Bajanomad was great when I was investigating the cpap machine many years ago now. That machine has been a Godsend, Les breathes so well at night now. No more snoring and no more scary sleep apnea.




BajaBlanca - 2-8-2018 at 03:06 AM

hernia laparoscoped and Les is good to go!

If anyone is interested, the doctor is

Dr. Hector Viarte 612 157-9664

His office is at the Santuario Maria Luiza de la Peña...old institution and not so beautiful but we really liked the doc.

I left my ipad there and will hopefully get it back tomorrow.


Alm - 7-11-2018 at 09:49 AM

Quote: Originally posted by BajaBlanca  
... Les is good to go!

Old thread, but - thinking that he is like before would be a mistake. 3 or 4 times more caution needs to be exercised after inguinal hernia surgery - for the rest of his life. Pretty much the same with "stomach" hernia, i.e. above the belly button.

Laparoscopy is a "keyhole surgery". Except for laparoscope - used for looking only - all other tools are the same as with the open method. They insert a 'scope through the small incision to see what to cut and sew. More difficult procedure because surgeon has to work with a 2D picture. General anesthesia is used, while open surgery is done with local anesthesia.

Everything else is the same as with open surgery. Same tools. Same mesh patch is stapled onto the damaged tissue. Same pain after surgery, since most pain comes from repaired tissues inside, not from the skin cut. Same (pretty high) % of partially failed surgeries and/or long-term discomfort, i.e. patient has chronic pain or feels the patch afterwards.

There is one exception - an open method without using the mesh. Reportedly lower % of failures and long-term discomfort , but very few places are doing this because it's more difficult yet than laparoscopy.

[Edited on 7-11-2018 by Alm]

motoged - 7-11-2018 at 11:25 AM

Seems like there can be serious complications with the "mesh" procedure.....infections, tumour development....seek alternative procedure and 2 other opinions...:light:

Alm - 7-11-2018 at 12:16 PM

A LOT of complications after hernia surgeries. Most of them are a tolerable discomfort. Some are new pains.

There is a specialized hernia clinic in Toronto Canada where they do mesh-less open surgery repair, but bad things may still happen. Inexpensive ~ $CAD 5,000 total bill. You do have to stay 3 nights after surgery.

BajaBlanca - 7-11-2018 at 12:58 PM

Les had a mesh inserted.


He is good good great.

Skipjack Joe - 7-12-2018 at 10:33 AM

I've had a lot of issues with mesh hernia repairs. The body just rejected the material causing inflammation, abcesses, and infections. Infections are hard to fight because the antibiotics don't get into the material very well. Just a nightmare. Finally had it all taken out and fixed with old fashioned open surgery. It doesn't look as pretty but that's a much smaller headache. Your mileage may vary.

One reason meshes have become popular is because we are more 'portly' than in the past and the stitches can't hold back that pressure. I'm talking about umbilical hernias but probably applies to all others.

[Edited on 7-12-2018 by Skipjack Joe]

Di Vinci

J.P. - 7-12-2018 at 10:44 AM

Dee just had surgery at Sharps Grossmont and it was done by Di Vinci.

[Edited on 7-12-2018 by J.P.]

BajaBlanca - 7-12-2018 at 01:32 PM

wow skipjack, your experience was sure different from Les's.

Wishing Dee a speedy recovery J.P.

Skipjack Joe - 7-12-2018 at 07:45 PM

Quote: Originally posted by BajaBlanca  
wow skipjack, your experience was sure different from Les's.


Yes, I was the exception, but there are others. Check out the lawsuits being advertised on television. Obviously when it goes well for you, you become less cautious but when it happens to you then you want to warn others. I've always been allergic to polyester materials so it wasn't too farfetched that I reacted to polypropylene placed into the body. The whole mesh surgical solution is going through a state of flux as the medical community is still modifying techniques and materials. Bottom line - all surgery is a crap shoot to some degree. Always a risk.

Skipjack Joe - 7-30-2018 at 06:03 AM

Thought these might be useful should Les start experiencing chronic pain:

http://www.nhbr.com/February-2-2018/Hernia-mesh-litigation-mounts/

https://www.sportshernia.com/problems-using-mesh-hernia-repair-surgery/?Read+more=Read+more


BajaBlanca - 7-30-2018 at 07:17 AM

Boy, very important to know.

Skipjack Joe - 7-30-2018 at 08:58 AM

Your chances of not having issues with mesh is about 85% I think. Some say it's closer to 70%. Those are good odds and if things are good for Les so far then it's likely to stay that way. But if things get bad I would really recommend Dr Brown. He hates mesh and knows how to take them out without causing more problems (they usually get stuck to your nerves or blood vessels).

https://www.sportshernia.com/treating-mesh-pain/surgical-mesh-removal-photo-gallery/

[Edited on 7-30-2018 by Skipjack Joe]

Alm - 8-4-2018 at 10:40 AM

70-85% of positive outcome means 15-30% risk of complications. In surgery this is considered VERY high risk. Compare to coronary bypass surgery where risk of complications is 1%.

Lawsuits with certain mesh types or just when something went wrong, are numerous. Not necessarily mesh-related. Inguinal hernia in men (the one below belly button) is too close to important nerves and organs. Thousands of people are afraid to go for surgery and choose to live with hernia rest of the life. Even some surgeons recommend against hernia repair when pre-op pain is tolerable.

This all made me choose the specialized mesh-less clinic in Toronto - twice, left hernia and 3 years later - with right. No regrets so far, though there were people with complications after this clinic too.

It's easy to forget that your sack has been "patched" and re-injure yourself again by lifting something heavy, this is a big no-no.