BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  4    6
Author: Subject: From Choral Pepper: The Lost Diaz Grave
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 2-21-2015 at 12:29 PM


Wash 4 is the only one of the three that easily goes to the top and beyond... however, all three are really way beyond the distance of a one day walk from the Model A, I think? Even my choice (Arroyo B) is pushing it for distance... but it had the landmarks easily seen from space.

The guys began their walk early and got to the rock pile at noon (5-6 hours = 10-12 miles). They then continued down to Arroyo Grande where they spent the night.

The second day they followed Arroyo Grande to the base of Borrego Mountain, then back to the Model A. (20-25 miles max?)




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
TMW
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 8738
Registered: 9-1-2003
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-21-2015 at 12:46 PM


Maybe I'm missing what he means by the base of Borrego Mtn as to me A. Grande does not go to what I think is the Mtn base. Arroyo Arrajal does as I see it. That's why I don't think he got to A. Grande.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 2-21-2015 at 02:44 PM


Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
Maybe I'm missing what he means by the base of Borrego Mtn as to me A. Grande does not go to what I think is the Mtn base. Arroyo Arrajal does as I see it. That's why I don't think he got to A. Grande.


At either #13 or #14 on your map is where he would be near the north slopes of Borrego and likely left Arroyo Grande to cross back east into Arroyo el Arrajal and return to the Model A.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Bug
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 60
Registered: 11-12-2005
Location: San Felipe, Baja
Member Is Offline

Mood: Life can not get better than this!

[*] posted on 2-21-2015 at 06:12 PM


I have been at the window shape rock behind La Ventena. And there is another off the Hwy 5 were the Rio Hardy starts behind the mountains. Next time I am out there and riding around I will look for Diaz grave. Thank David K for sharing all the information.
View user's profile
PaulW
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1036
Registered: 5-21-2013
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 09:35 AM


Tom,
Thanks for the pics and coords. Saved me a lot of time to get the coords from GE. Turns out effort on GE is way inadequate compared to your list. I re-did my AG GPS track with your wash WPs. I will drive there soon, but am leading a trip so I wont have time for any hikes. I should be able to grab some more pics and clean up my cobbled up GPS track.
BTW, I am still a skeptic about where those 2 guys camped? My take is unless they walked easterly to the headwaters of Arrajal wash a trek over the mountains would be a really big deal. On my to do list is to drive to those headwaters just to see how far I can get so I can define a real WP.
I will elaborate after more research and drives.
Paul
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 10:08 AM


In Henderson's letter, they camped in Arroyo Grande... then the next day hiked to the base of Borrego Mountain and returned back to the Model A.



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
mexicali-kid
Junior Nomad
*


Avatar


Posts: 39
Registered: 4-28-2014
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 11:15 AM


Very good story, but who is going to take a Ford Model A, a fairly new vehicle at the time, Manufactured from 1927-31 to the desert? And then they just leave it while they hike around for a couple of days ? This doesn't pass the sniff test.

We know Melchior Diaz was in the delta of the Colorado because he described an unusual feature. There was a volcano in the delta. Today it's called Cerro Prieto. 18 miles south of Mexicali.

We know he was injured while chasing dogs that were harassing his sheep. Our location of the accident should be near forage and water because of the sheep. So along with the volcano description we can guess he was somewhere along the western edge\grasslands of the delta.

It is unlikely that after the injury his group traveled/explored any more. They would have turned back.

If he died soon afterward I would look for a grave "on a hill overlooking a narrow valley" in the Sierra Cucupa near Cerro Prieto or across the river near Yuma.

If he lived 20 more days as is often reported, He is probably buried 100 miles from the Colorado Delta area. Somewhere up the Gila or Colorado Rivers as his group would have tried to reconnect with Coronado or return to Mexico.

Been looking for 20 years. Haven't found it yet.








View user's profile
TMW
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 8738
Registered: 9-1-2003
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 11:35 AM


I don't disagree with you as to where he may be buried. To me finding this rockpile of Hendersons is a search of its own and I'm interested in what is there. Maybe nothing or maybe something.
View user's profile
TMW
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 8738
Registered: 9-1-2003
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 11:43 AM


Paul make sure you check out DKs B location since I did not get it.
At or near 31-32.950x115-19.170.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 11:51 AM


Hi Mexicali, thanks for posting!

In the 1930's, leaving your car that far from civilization was not a worry, the road to San Felipe wasn't paved until the 1950's and the paved road to Ensenada from El Chinero (Hwy. 3 now) wasn't finished until 1978.

There are also bubbling mud pots near the Salton Sea... but I favor the Cerro Prieto site, naturally.

As for why the Diaz party continued south after the injury, it was to try and meet Alacron's ship (at San Felipe?) and they hugged the mountains to have access to fresh water and to avoid the swamps and salt flats of the delta and Laguna Salada... that's my guess!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 11:56 AM


Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
I don't disagree with you as to where he may be buried. To me finding this rockpile of Hendersons is a search of its own and I'm interested in what is there. Maybe nothing or maybe something.


It is not the destination, but instead it is the journey!

Same reason we all went looking of elbeau's Santa Isabel Google Earth site in Arroyo el Volcan, back in 2011. What fun was that? Lot's! Also, it was Baja Lou's last adventure before his final great one... and I think we all were very proud to share that with him... he really enjoyed it. Finding the Henderson 'rock-pile' should be a BajaLou memorial event, as he wanted to look for it.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
PaulW
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1036
Registered: 5-21-2013
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-22-2015 at 01:12 PM


Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
Paul make sure you check out DKs B location since I did not get it.
At or near 31-32.950x115-19.170.

========
Got it
View user's profile
PaulW
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1036
Registered: 5-21-2013
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 2-28-2015 at 03:42 PM
Watershed Divide


Watershed divide just east of Arroyo Grande
Maps are INEGI H11Bxx, I made the scans from hard copy - not download images.
NW of 36 mates with NE corner of 35
SW of 26 mates with NW of 36
Orange line defines the divide
A is Arroyo Arrajal
Note two major drainages feeding Arrajal
The major drainage on Map 26 dumps north of where they parked and is close to PPW.
Map 36 Datum 27


Map 26 Datum 92


Map 35 Datum 92

View user's profile
güéribo
Nomad
**




Posts: 239
Registered: 10-17-2014
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-9-2015 at 09:43 AM


Regarding Melchior Diaz, have you read "The Devil's Highway" by Luis Alberto Urrea? A sobering and informative book (plus it's quite a page-turner) about a group of migrants attempting to cross the border, who tragically died in the Arizona desert and became known as the "Yuma 14."

Urrea begins his book with Melchior Diaz:

January 18,1541.

Sonoita (also known as Sonoyta) was perhaps not much more than sticks and mud, but it was a stopping point for a Spanish expedition in search of, what else, gold. Even in 1541, Sonoita was the unwilling host of killers and wanderers. The leader of this clanking Spaniard patrol was a firebrand known as Melchior Diaz. He didn't especially want to spend his holidays in the broiling dust of Sonoita, but he was deep into hostile territory. It was commonly believed that the natives of the Devil's Highway devoured human children. The Spaniards weren't planning on settling-spread the cross around, throw up a mission, and hit the road in search of better things.

Melchior Diaz was trying to reach the Sea of Cortez, lying between the Mexican mainland and Baja California. Perhaps he knew that ahead of him lay the most hellish stretch of land in the entire north. The dirt paths he rode his horse down on that day are now the paved and semipaved barrio lanes of modern Sonoita. Some of the hubcap-popping boulders in Sonoita's hillside alleys are the same rocks on which Melchior's horse's shoes struck sparks.

He died trying to kill a dog. He probably didn't have anything against canines--his troop had dogs that they used to hunt down game and humans. But there were also the feral creatures that dashed in from the out-skirts of the settlement to slaughter his sheep. Melchior Diaz kept his sheep in small brush corrals, attended by his Indian slaves. But the wild dogs had a way of sneaking off with lambs when nobody was looking.

And Melchior was cranky. He had spent his holidays far from home, among the savages, and even Tucson was only a small scattering of huts and lean-tos. He couldn't have been farther from Mexico City or Spain. Sonoita was the end of the world. A Christmas in this outpost did not inspire joy. Besides, conquistadores were notoriously short on joie de vivre.

Melchior rode well, and he rode well armed. He certainly carried a sword and a fighting dagger. He probably carried a harquebus and a long metal-tipped lance, the M16 of the day.

Melchior was a strong man and a powerful fighter. In the narratives of the Coronado expedition, we see him plying his trade: "... the horsemen began to overtake [the Indians] and the lances cut them down mercilessly ... until not a man was to be seen." This rout of natives serves as the preface to the story of death that begins with Melchior Díaz.

We know that he was riding his horse down one of the settlement paths. We can project the smells swirling around him: horse, dirt, his own stink, chickens, smoke, dung. Not all that different from the smells of today.

He was approaching his sheep pen, perhaps where the Asi Es Mi Tierra taco shop, or a Pemex station stands today. Melchior squinted ahead and--Damn it to hell!--those lazy slaves of his had allowed a dog to get in the pen!

Perro desgraciado!

No record states how Melchior entered the pen, but it doesn't seem likely he stopped to open a gate. Not Melchior. He jumped over the fence, and in jumping, somehow he bobbled his lance throw and missed the dog entirely. You can see the dog yipping and sidestepping and making tracks for the horizon, casting wounded looks over his shoulder. And here is where Melchior Diaz died. The record states that Melchior, somehow, "passed over" the lance. Did he fall from the horse? No one knows, but the lance managed to penetrate his gut and rip him open.

The desert ground must have seemed terribly hard as he hit it. As Melchior died (it took twenty gruesome days)on his stinking cot, he burned and howled. Flies settled in his entrails. Maybe the very dog that killed him drew near to sniff the rich meaty scent. The fallen angels of Desolation came out of the Cabeza Prieta, folded their hands over him, and smiled . . .

http://www.amazon.com/The-Devils-Highway-True-Story/dp/03160...

View user's profile
ehall
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1167
Registered: 3-29-2014
Location: Buckeye, Az
Member Is Offline

Mood: It's 5 o'clock somewhere

[*] posted on 4-9-2015 at 10:28 AM


Thats a great way to start a book. I liked the way it is written. Felt like I was watching it happen.
View user's profile
güéribo
Nomad
**




Posts: 239
Registered: 10-17-2014
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 4-9-2015 at 10:56 AM


Urrea is a great writer. And he was born in Baja. "The Devil's Highway" was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. From his website:

--

Luis Alberto Urrea, 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction and member of the Latino Literature Hall of Fame, is a prolific and acclaimed writer who uses his dual-culture life experiences to explore greater themes of love, loss and triumph.

Born in Tijuana, Mexico to a Mexican father and an American mother, Urrea has published extensively in all the major genres. The critically acclaimed and best-selling author of 13 books, Urrea has won numerous awards for his poetry, fiction and essays. The Devil's Highway, his 2004 non-fiction account of a group of Mexican immigrants lost in the Arizona desert, won the Lannan Literary Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Pacific Rim Kiriyama Prize. An historical novel, The Hummingbird's Daughter tells the story of Teresa Urrea, sometimes known as the Saint of Cabora and the Mexican Joan of Arc. The book, which involved 20 years of research and writing, won the Kiriyama Prize in fiction and, along with The Devil's Highway, was named a best book of the year by many publications. It has been optioned by acclaimed Mexican director Luis Mandoki for a film to star Antonio Banderas.

Urrea's most recent novel, Into the Beautiful North, imagines a small town in Mexico where all the men have immigrated to the U.S. A group of young women, after seeing the film The Magnificent Seven, decide to follow the men North and persuade them to return to their beloved village. A national best-seller, Into the Beautiful North, earned a citation of excellence from the American Library Association Rainbow's Project. A short story from Urrea's collection, Six Kinds of Sky, was recently released as a stunning graphic novel by Cinco Puntos Press. Mr.Mendoza's Paintbrush, illustrated by artist Christopher Cardinale, has already garnered rave reviews and serves as a perfect companion to Into the Beautiful North as it depicts the same village in the novel.

Into the Beautiful North, The Devil's Highway and The Hummingbird's Daughter have been chosen by more than 30 different cities and colleges for One Book community read programs.

Urrea has also won an Edgar award from the Mystery Writers of America for best short story (2009, "Amapola" in Phoenix Noir). His first book, Across the Wire, was named a New York Times Notable Book and won the Christopher Award. Urrea also won a 1999 American Book Award for his memoir, Nobody's Son: Notes from an American Life and in 2000, he was voted into the Latino Literature Hall of Fame following the publication of Vatos. His book of short stories, Six Kinds of Sky, was named the 2002 small-press Book of the Year in fiction by the editors of ForeWord magazine. He has also won a Western States Book Award in poetry for The Fever of Being and was in The 1996 Best American Poetry collection. Urrea's other titles include By the Lake of Sleeping Children, In Search of Snow, Ghost Sickness and Wandering Time.

Urrea attended the University of California at San Diego, earning an undergraduate degree in writing, and did his graduate studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder.

After serving as a relief worker in Tijuana and a film extra and columnist-editor-cartoonist for several publications, Urrea moved to Boston where he taught expository writing and fiction workshops at Harvard. He has also taught at Massachusetts Bay Community College and the University of Colorado and he was the writer in residence at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette.

Urrea lives with his family in Naperville, IL, where he is a professor of creative writing at the University of Illinois-Chicago.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 4-9-2015 at 03:55 PM


That was some creative writing twists he added to the Diaz story! He mentions Tucson, which didn't exist until over 200 more years after Diaz died!

Thanks for the link!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 4-11-2015 at 07:31 AM


OK, for newest discussion and the 2015 expedition to find Captain Diaz, please go to the Baja Hiking Forum, here: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=78057



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51246
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 10-7-2017 at 09:45 AM


For those not familiar with this historical interest subject having read Fatboy's latest posts.... bumping up.



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
 Pages:  1  ..  4    6

  Go To Top


For high speed satellite internet in Baja call +1.6197170810 - or click here to email sistemassatelitales@hotmail.com



Tijuana Walking Tours - on Meetup.com


 






All Content Copyright © 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group 






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

 

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

 

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

 

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262