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Author: Subject: Round Wood Homes delivered to Baja
durrelllrobert
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lol.gif posted on 3-20-2008 at 10:24 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by DENNIS
Did you ever try to buy furniture for a round house? Good luck.

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:




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Gadget
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 11:52 AM


We've stayed in them at San Ignacio Springs B&B twice now. Wonderful nights sleep. They are beautiful inside and Gary and Terry tell us they are very weather proof. The ones there are on a concrete slab and the steel reinforcement is turned up out of the slab and tied to the wall supports to hold them down in high winds.

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gibson
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 01:09 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Taco de Baja
I spent some time in one in 2005 at the NPS headquarters near Hosmer Grove on the side of Haleakala on Maui. I can tell you, they can easily take a steady 40-50MPH no problem. But, they are VERY noisy at that speed. They apparently get even higher winds at that location too.....


apples & oranges. (wooden finish vs tent-like finish)
anyways ... no response from Oregon Yurtwork promoter which leads me to believe you'd be CRAZY to plonk one of these down in Baja Sur, unless it was no problem for you to shell out the expense of a replacement should a hurricane pass thru.
Concrete base / walls with palapa roof maybe?

[Edited on 3-20-2008 by gibson]
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Mango
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 06:16 PM


Some more info here. Not the best structure to ride out a hurricane according to the maker of these particular yurts.

http://www.yurts-r-us.com/HowAYurtWorks.html

The beauty of a "traditional" yurt is that is that it is transportable. If a hurricane is coming, pack it up and move it, or store it somewhere safe. Some of the fancy ones would be quite a chore to move.

If you are in an area where flooding may occur, moving your living space may actually be a better option that a bombproof concrete structure that will stay intact but fill with mud and water. Either way, a yurt is not a traditional house and comparing one to a traditional house is like comparing apples and oranges.

Quote:
Originally posted by DENNIS
Did you ever try to buy furniture for a round house? Good luck.


Agreed, furniture against the outer walls is a tough thing. But; yurts are usually used by minimalists that don't have much, or the larger fancy ones usually have some straight walls built across them. At least you can't be cornered by the devil inside.
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 07:33 PM


Thanks Mango ........For the words of wisdom. Yurts belong in Tibet with their proud "Nomads", that ply the steppes and follow their stock.... It would be ashame an estetic disaster to see them popping up all over Baja just because their "cheap and easy". Personaly, I think most people go to Mexico to see Mexicans and feel Mexico. Pallapa and carboard and tarpaper stuctures serve just as well and are way more authentic as well as simple adobe block structures with hand troweled plaster finishes. I hope people that can afford to build second homes in Baja will try to keep it "Mexican". ++C++
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DENNIS
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 08:16 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Crusoe
Thanks Mango ........For the words of wisdom. Yurts belong in Tibet with their proud "Nomads", that ply the steppes and follow their stock.... It would be ashame an estetic disaster to see them popping up all over Baja just because their "cheap and easy". Personaly, I think most people go to Mexico to see Mexicans and feel Mexico. Pallapa and carboard and tarpaper stuctures serve just as well and are way more authentic as well as simple adobe block structures with hand troweled plaster finishes. I hope people that can afford to build second homes in Baja will try to keep it "Mexican". ++C++


You must be a little less than thrilled to see all the old, worn out mobile homes that come south out of the states. Especially up here in the north, they are everywhere and more coming in every day. I don't know if the narrow road is prohibiting them from being delivered south but folks down there should hope that's the case.
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gibson
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 08:46 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Crusoe
Thanks Mango ........For the words of wisdom. Yurts belong in Tibet with their proud "Nomads", that ply the steppes and follow their stock.... It would be ashame an estetic disaster to see them popping up all over Baja just because their "cheap and easy". Personaly, I think most people go to Mexico to see Mexicans and feel Mexico. Pallapa and carboard and tarpaper stuctures serve just as well and are way more authentic as well as simple adobe block structures with hand troweled plaster finishes. I hope people that can afford to build second homes in Baja will try to keep it "Mexican". ++C++


agreed and me thinx you have absolutely nothing to worry about.
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Packoderm
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[*] posted on 3-20-2008 at 10:29 PM


It seems that the good thing about having a yurt would be that it wouldn't hurt as bad if some person evicted you from your property. You can haul it out of there.
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DENNIS
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[*] posted on 3-21-2008 at 07:04 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Packoderm
It seems that the good thing about having a yurt would be that it wouldn't hurt as bad if some person evicted you from your property. You can haul it out of there.


Excellent point.
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Diver
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[*] posted on 3-21-2008 at 07:18 AM


Something about getting all your valueables stolen by anyone with a machete' doesn't appeal to me.
.
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[*] posted on 3-21-2008 at 08:37 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Diver
Something about getting all your valueables stolen by anyone with a machete' doesn't appeal to me.
.


Another excellent point. I guess a soft-sided yurt is only a glorified tent.
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[*] posted on 3-21-2008 at 10:14 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by DENNIS
Quote:
Originally posted by Diver
Something about getting all your valueables stolen by anyone with a machete' doesn't appeal to me.
.


Another excellent point. I guess a soft-sided yurt is only a glorified tent.


Then all you would need to accompany the yurt would be a rusting hulk of a shipping container to store the stuff that others might be tempted to swipe.:lol: Really, if I had a shipping container on a Baja lot, I would frame up a pitched palapa roof on top for it. Not only would it look better, but it would insulate it from the hot sun. As far as how difficult it would be to break into a yurt, it couldn't be much more difficult to break into any of the casitas along the shore at Alfosinas in Gonzaga. The storage container would reduce the temptation. It would be easy to pack up when somebody with money, power, or a good lawyer decides that they should have the property rather than you.
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[*] posted on 4-3-2008 at 09:14 AM


Quote:
This is a Pacific Yurts model, they are canvas as you can see. Oregon Yurtworks build the wooden yurts. www.yurtworks.com

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[*] posted on 4-5-2008 at 10:05 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by DENNIS
Did you ever try to buy furniture for a round house? Good luck.


Actually, those round livingroom modulars are perfect for a large yurt. They can sit up near a rounded wall or can be placed to the center of a room to act as a room divider, ie. to separate livingroom from dining area. Wooden furniture with rounded Moorish-arch tops and round handles, while not round-backed, reference the round walls and non-linear feel of this special home. (Gee, I shoulda been born an interior decorator or tent salesman;)) Yurts are great, imo.
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[*] posted on 6-2-2009 at 03:52 PM


I don't care what you name it, it's still a tent.
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Russ
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[*] posted on 6-2-2009 at 07:39 PM


Now called Mindful Living http://www.yurtworks.com/
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