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Author: Subject: Malarimo Beach (better late than never)
David K
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[*] posted on 6-21-2009 at 09:40 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by bufeo
Thanks dtbushpilot, nice report and photos.

Brings back really great memories: spring 1972, minimal maps/guides—(Cliff Cross who hadn't been out there), Gerhard and Gulick (who also admitted to not driving the route), Walt Wheelock's map, AA map with only dashed-lines—a "piece of eight", and visions of treasures. Oh, and no pavement.

Incredible winds for three consecutive days had all but obliterated any sign of track north from San José de Castro. This was before GPSs, but we had a compass and sextant and the promise from a local at SJdC that if we didn't report back within five days he would come looking for us.

It was a marvelous adventure and it appears that you had one as well. I applaud you for taking your truck-camper out there. You must have had moments... .

Allen R


The odd 'ol days before Hwy. 1 was finished! :spingrin::tumble::bounce:

McMahan Map-r.JPG - 49kB




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dtbushpilot
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[*] posted on 6-21-2009 at 11:12 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by bufeo
Thanks dtbushpilot, nice report and photos.

Brings back really great memories: spring 1972, minimal maps/guides—(Cliff Cross who hadn't been out there), Gerhard and Gulick (who also admitted to not driving the route), Walt Wheelock's map, AA map with only dashed-lines—a "piece of eight", and visions of treasures. Oh, and no pavement.

Incredible winds for three consecutive days had all but obliterated any sign of track north from San José de Castro. This was before GPSs, but we had a compass and sextant and the promise from a local at SJdC that if we didn't report back within five days he would come looking for us.

It was a marvelous adventure and it appears that you had one as well. I applaud you for taking your truck-camper out there. You must have had moments... .

Allen R


We had a few "moments" to be sure. Going in there were several places where you could see that someone had been stuck and had to dig out. We made it in ok but I spent the whole time we were there worried about the trip out. The arroyo runs down hill going in (of course) and I was concerned that going up hill on the way out we would be more likely to dig in. Also, while trying to dig a hole for a fire I found that we were parked in the middle of a mud flat and wondered if I would wake in the morning to find that we had slowly sunk in the mud. To add to my concerns, while gathering wood for a fire well behind the camper in the arroyo I realized that the wood I was gathering was drift wood. Looking around I realized that there was washed up trash around too and that I was parked within the high tide line. I had no idea what type of tide to expect but it looked as though the water rarely came up that high so I decided to stay put.
I took this picture of our camp site while standing just about where the beach sand started. It looked to me like we were well back from the water but I looked outside more than once during the night.


We heard lots of coyotes during the night and we could hear them checking out our camp site. It was too dark to see them but in the morning there were tracks all around the camper.

We all know that you shouldn't camp alone especially in remote areas an although I do it often I do worry about security in the back of my mind. Jill worries about it more in the front of her mind. I do carry a few things to protect us in the camper but would rather not have to go there.I don't know of many more remote places than Mallarimo beach and I must admit I was a bit spooked. In the morning after coffee we went for a walk down the beach about a mile looking for treasure. On the way back Jill grabbed my arm and pointed down the beach. There were 4 men walking down the beach toward us from the area where we were camped. I could tell by the way Jill's fingernails were digging into my flesh that she was more than casually concerned.....so was I. There I was with my plastic coffee cup for a weapon and nothing else. I did my best to look imposing and confident as they approached but knew in my heart that if they had bad intentions we were screwed.

As it turned out they were locals looking for treasure just as we were and after a brief chat they went on their way. When we got back to camp we saw their vehicle parked near our truck. I broke camp and headed out quickly so that we would be ahead of them on the road out and could get help from them if we got stuck, fortunately we didn't and we found the hub cap from our truck right where a rock knocked it off on the way in.....glad I didn't run it over.

We still camp in remote places but not as much as before.....dt




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David K
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[*] posted on 5-21-2022 at 08:48 AM


One of the great trip reports from the glory days of Baja Nomad!



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[*] posted on 5-21-2022 at 11:22 AM


I've been to Malarrimo Beach twice over the last 20 years and both times it was a fun adventure. The area where the arroyo meets the beach has changed a lot between my first and second visit. Still lots of junk. We found a new wet suit with the sales tags still on it. An underwater camera with one picture taken of a scuba diver. Last trip there were about a million flip flops, take your pick.

On my first trip we saw a very large Badger going in and coming out, of course we stayed clear of him. I rode my MC on the beach among 5 or 6 coyotes until they got exhausted and left the beach.

I never found any alcohol or torpedo's like some did years ago.

I think it's time for another trip there.
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