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Author: Subject: Gabacho vs. Gringo
gnukid
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 02:55 PM


BMG we always call you Pancencito?
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 03:08 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by gnukid
Gabacho means rancher, Gringo could be either Gabacho or Capitain i.e. rancher or yachtee, but there are only those two choices, officially speaking of course. Other sub-classes include surfer or racer those though fall into Capitain and Gabacho respectively. Know it, live it, love it and play the part.


HUH?????

Gabacho
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Gabacho (feminine, Gabacha) is a rather derogatory word used in Spanish to describe foreigners of different origins:

In the United States it is used mainly by Mexican Americans (and by extension American Hispanics) as a pejorative name for White Americans. It is not widely used or understood by Spanish speakers in the Americas outside the USA and Mexico. The term Güero (disambiguation) or Huero is sometimes used interchangeably to describe someone who is pale skinned.
In Mexico it refers to both the US citizens and their country ("El Gabacho"), especially as an alternative to the milder gringo. It became widely used in Mexico during the French occupation as a term to refer to the invading French.
In Spain, where the word was first used in Spanish, it was used in the first instance to describe people from the skirts of the Pyrenees and then, more generally, when referring to a person from France, which is its main use today. It is also used in Occitan for a rude mountain dweller who speaks the national language badly, this being the origin of the word that, by semantic sliding, was then applied to French people in Spain and to US Anglo-Saxon citizens in Mexico or the United States by Mexican-Americans
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 03:10 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by gnukid
BMG we always call you Pancencito?


Okay, I am now be called one of 2 things. A roll or a big belly. Not sure which, but I still prefer El Guapo.




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gnukid
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 05:10 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by DENNIS
Quote:
Originally posted by gnukid
Gabacho means rancher, Gringo could be either Gabacho or Capitain i.e. rancher or yachtee, but there are only those two choices, officially speaking of course. Other sub-classes include surfer or racer those though fall into Capitain and Gabacho respectively. Know it, live it, love it and play the part.


HUH?????

Gabacho
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gabacho (feminine, Gabacha) is a rather derogatory word used in Spanish to describe foreigners of different origins:

In the United States it is used mainly by Mexican Americans (and by extension American Hispanics) as a pejorative name for White Americans. It is not widely used or understood by Spanish speakers in the Americas outside the USA and Mexico. The term Güero (disambiguation) or Huero is sometimes used interchangeably to describe someone who is pale skinned.
In Mexico it refers to both the US citizens and their country ("El Gabacho"), especially as an alternative to the milder gringo. It became widely used in Mexico during the French occupation as a term to refer to the invading French.
In Spain, where the word was first used in Spanish, it was used in the first instance to describe people from the skirts of the Pyrenees and then, more generally, when referring to a person from France, which is its main use today. It is also used in Occitan for a rude mountain dweller who speaks the national language badly, this being the origin of the word that, by semantic sliding, was then applied to French people in Spain and to US Anglo-Saxon citizens in Mexico or the United States by Mexican-Americans


Dennis,

First off, wikipedia is hardly a source of record as it is edited by anyone and no one is paid to do so though that isn't the point. The definition stated in wikipedia aligns precisely with the one I provided, as in a rancher, meaning someone of non-mexican non-spanish, primarily european such as french or us anglo people in spain or in mexico who may speak spanish poorly (that is not paceno mexican which may include people who speak castilian spanish) though are likely owners of plots of land of mountainous regions, as such the kind definition suggests historically "rancher" not farmer or sea captain.

In terms of connotation or the denotation of gabacho, my suggestion as non-mexican "rancher" and yours; the one provided by wikipedia as rough speaking mountain dweller of anglo descent are hardly different.

Though if you wish to choose an argument, it seems in this case you lose, again.

Now if you wish to pursue it further, we can. In terms of the use of the word gabacho or gringo, remember that indigenous people to Mexico call anyone non-indigenous guero or gringo or mestizo and technically all people of non-indigenous descent are mestizos which includes spanish, anglo and all mixed descent people who are practically speaking 100% of the population though many Mexicans consider mestizos only those of dark skin, that would be incorrect prejudice as well, in practice.

So practically speaking it depends on your perspective. Now, getting back to our point about Gabacho, as in my case where the inmigration hot babe Maria asked me if I was a gabacho with a wink, I took it to mean, am I of other parts, from the mountains as opposed to La Paz and likely of non-indigenous background, possibly european with an accent to my spanish different than Pacenos and likely a land owner.

In my case as I am sure in yours being called gabacho or gringo is hardly a outright insult or derogatory. If I may add, I considered the tone or denotation to be complimentary at worst in a teasing and fun tone.

However, I might add that I would jump to the conclusion that most comments in Mexico are meant in a teasing and fun tone first and foremost and those who take offense may be missing an opportunity to make friends and a connection in response to extended personalized greetings.
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 06:10 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by gnukid

Though if you wish to choose an argument, it seems in this case you lose, again.



No...I'm not looking for an arguement about anything. It's just my opinion that both words are derogatory and carry that conotation until they hit the brick wall of thick-skinned Americans who have chosen to adopt the insult and treat them as cute Mexicanisms without any knowledge of the sentiment of the words. They are not terms of endearment nor were they ever meant to be.
So, you can hang out at that office with the winking, blinking assistant and have her insult you 'till you're red, white and blue in the face if that's what makes you feel good but, I'll bet everything I have that she wouldn't be caught dead with you in public.
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 06:29 PM


Dennis, I hear what you are saying but having lived, worked and married into the local community for many years I can say with a lot of confidence that the vast overwhelming majority here use the term with no insult intended.

I think a lot of folks here prefer to use the term of Gringo or Gavacho in lieu of calling us "Americanos" as they also see themselves as "Americanos". It also relieves them of the task of determining if we are from the USA, Canada, etc. We all just become Gringos/Gavachos.

They are aware that some of us may see the term as derogatory and some may hesitate to use it in our presence. At least until they know how we feel about it on a personal basis. Whatever be the case that is not their intent behind its usage any more than they intend to insult when they use terms like negro, gordo, viejo, pelon, etc among each other.

Can they use it in an insulting way? Of course! Just like we could use any innocent term in an insulting way if that is what we mean to do. To not understand that is simply a lack of interaction with the local culture on their level, in their vernacular and knowing their true hearts and motivation. It took me years of living and speaking ONLY Spanish to reach that point. I can understand how some may not get it based on how PC we have become in the USA. I also suspect any dictionary definition saying it is in fact derogatory would be written by an author who also believes that terms like negro, fat, skinny, shorty, baldy, old man, etc are also derogatory.

In the Latin culture it simply is not seen that way.

But I also respect your right to hold a different opinion and I am just happy to see you posting again so I promise never to call you a gav__ho or gr__go.

OK?

;)




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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 06:30 PM


and tell me Gnu

Which indigenous are you refering to? Some might say there aren't many "indigenous" people left in Baja CaliforniA.


he term 'indigenous people' or 'autochthonous peoples' can be used to describe any ethnic group of people who inhabit a geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection, alongside migrants which have populated the region and which are greater in number. [1] However, several widely-accepted formulations, which define the term "indigenous peoples" in stricter terms, have been put forward by prominent and internationally-recognized organizations, such as the United Nations, the International Labour Organization and the World Bank. Indigenous peoples in this article is used in such a narrower sense.

Drawing on these, a contemporary working definition of "indigenous people" for certain purposes has criteria which would seek to include cultural groups (and their continuity or association with a given region, or parts of a region, and who formerly or currently inhabit the region either:

* before its subsequent colonization or annexation; or
* alongside other cultural groups during the formation of a nation-state; or
* independently or largely isolated from the influence of the claimed governance by a nation-state,

and who furthermore:

* have maintained at least in part their distinct linguistic, cultural and social/organizational characteristics, and in doing so remain differentiated in some degree from the surrounding populations and dominant culture of the nation-state.

To the above, a criterion is usually added to also include:

* peoples who are self-identified as indigenous, and/or those recognised as such by other groups.

Note that even if all the above criteria are fulfilled, some people may either not consider themselves as indigenous or may not be considered as indigenous by governments, organizations or scholars
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 08:00 PM


Just call me Gringo culo prieto! Grassyass



On June 8, 2013, Jihad Jay Salman of Temple City California invited Elinvestig8r over for coffee, but in the end, Jihad Salman was too frightened to open his front door. Elinvestig8r went over to get an apology from Jihad Salman after he put Elinvestig8r’s Peace Officer son in danger by revealing his name address and telephone number. On January 5, 2016, Jihad Jay Ezzeddine Salman of Temple City California was again too frightened open his front door after inviting Elinvestig8r for coffee. Prior to the visit Jihad Salman told Elinvestig8r to come at his own risk because he was armed. Facing extreme danger, Elinvestig8r went over to see Jihad Salman in the pouring rain to meet him for coffee and ask for an apology for putting Elinvestig8r’s Peace Officer son in danger. It is obvious Jihad Jay Ezzeddine Salman of Temple City California is too frightened of Elinvestig8r and will never meet with him for coffee to apologize for putting his Peace Officer son in danger by revealing his name address and telephone number!
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 08:13 PM


David thats exactly what my granmother used to tell me whe I move to the states,thanks for remind me of her..



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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 08:40 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by ELINVESTI8
Just call me Gringo culo prieto! Grassyass


online translation-
Foreign blackish bottom

:lol::lol::o:lol:
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[*] posted on 12-9-2008 at 08:42 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by BajaGringo
Whatever be the case that is not their intent behind its usage any more than they intend to insult when they use terms like negro, gordo, viejo, pelon, etc among each other.


True . . . as another example, anyone who looks oriental is a chino (Chinese), regardless of whether they are Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese or anything else. The details just aren't important . . . :no:
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 07:19 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by BajaGringo
But I also respect your right to hold a different opinion and I am just happy to see you posting again so I promise never to call you a gav__ho or gr__go.

OK?

;)


Thanks, Ron. You can call me anything you want. I'm too old to care. My wonderment is at why our diverse culture will accept some derogatory labels and not others. Pretty soon we'll be joking and laughing when called "Infidel."
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 07:41 AM


diane is correct regarding prudent use of nicknames...I have made that mistake more than once...(usually having never even heard the guys's real name) however...In my opinion, the reason mexicans may ask if "gringo" is offensive is because they have heard foreigners tell them it is offensive...which mystifies them...but nowadays they often ask new gringos...kind of take a poll and have learned that many are offended by it...which only stops them from saying it to you...so as not to offend you but it's still widely used amongst themselves.



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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 07:44 AM
Dennis Infidel!






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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 08:15 AM


Nicest thing you've ever said to me, Gull. Merry Christmas.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 10:17 AM


BajaCat you are welcome. If someone tells me I am a Gringo Culo Prieto it is a compliment. Loosely translated it means American who knows the Mexican culture and speaks Spanish.



On June 8, 2013, Jihad Jay Salman of Temple City California invited Elinvestig8r over for coffee, but in the end, Jihad Salman was too frightened to open his front door. Elinvestig8r went over to get an apology from Jihad Salman after he put Elinvestig8r’s Peace Officer son in danger by revealing his name address and telephone number. On January 5, 2016, Jihad Jay Ezzeddine Salman of Temple City California was again too frightened open his front door after inviting Elinvestig8r for coffee. Prior to the visit Jihad Salman told Elinvestig8r to come at his own risk because he was armed. Facing extreme danger, Elinvestig8r went over to see Jihad Salman in the pouring rain to meet him for coffee and ask for an apology for putting Elinvestig8r’s Peace Officer son in danger. It is obvious Jihad Jay Ezzeddine Salman of Temple City California is too frightened of Elinvestig8r and will never meet with him for coffee to apologize for putting his Peace Officer son in danger by revealing his name address and telephone number!
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 10:43 AM


When I asked my Jalisco native wife about the use of "Gabacho" she said, "Isn't that some kind of soup?"

After further discussion she said she knows the term, but they never used it in Mascota.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 11:01 AM


When they want to insult us they say, "P-nche Gringo Puto!' or "P-nche Gringa Puta" :lol::lol:
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 01:32 PM


Se dice "Norteamerigringo", por favor.;D

In my experience, gabacho is used more often by Chicanos in the U.S. than by Mexicans. When Mexicans want to refer to "white" people in general, in reference to race specifically rather than nationality, they say "Sajon". In Texas the term "Anglo" is used by both white and brown Texans. "Anglo-Sajon" is usually found only in textbooks.

When I taught English in Mexico City, my students would often ask if I found the term "gringo" to be offensive. I would say no, especially if a pretty girl said "Hola, Gringuito." "But", I would add, "please don't call me yanqui." and then I would explain a bit about my Confederate ancestors.




All my childhood I wanted to be older. Now I\'m older and this chitn sucks.
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 02:08 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Oso
"But", I would add, "please don't call me yanqui."


Thank God we don't hear much of the word, "Yanqui" as it rarely stands alone. It's usually joined with, "Go home."
We can thank the same God that Mexicans are as gracious as they are or we might hear what they really think of us.
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