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Author: Subject: Gabacho vs. Gringo
shari
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[*] posted on 12-10-2008 at 02:14 PM


I once made the mistake of using the work Yankee to refer to our american amigos which resulted in an educational tongue lashing. It was just a term that many canadians use for americans and was not meant to be insulting either...we use the term yanks loosely and innocently...even if they were confederates. Example: yanks like weak beer....Remember, us canucks are inferiors and rather ignorant...so try to go easy on us.



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LOSARIPES
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[*] posted on 12-12-2008 at 05:20 AM


Baja is famous for making up nicknames. A previous governor had a driver who was missing an ear. They called him "Cabeza de tasa" (coffee cup head)

An old policeman in La Paz had a stiff leg and walk with a very pronounced limp. He hit the ground rather hard with one of his legs every step, so he used metal reinforcements on his shoe heel. If you watched him walk at nights you would see and occasional spark. They called him "Encendedor sin gas" (out of fuel lighter)

Of course, there is "El zurdo" (lefty), the guy who is missing his right arm.

Ex-governor Cervantes el Rio, while giving a speech on official visit to Todos Santos, spoke well, using real fancy words nobody understood was named "Pico de Oro" (Golden beak) a nickname for which was known nationally for the rest of his political career.

Here is one that non-Mexicans would not understand without explanation:
There are many street dogs in Mexico. They follow, bark and bug you at times, whether you are walking, jogging, bicycle riding, etc.
No all streets are paved, so there are rocks/stones on the ground here and there. People chase the dogs away by throwing stones at them. The dogs learn the moves and know that every time a person bends down as to pick up a stone, it is time to run. And they run away, spooked and scared as they see the stone coming their way. This is common knowledge, part of the culture.
Well, There was a newspaper peddler in La Paz who walked with a big limp, bending himself down to one side almost to touch the ground with his hand. They called him "Espanta perros".... sort of like "dog chaser"...

No respect and definitely an incredible sense of humor.

Mexican TV news reporters refer to Obama as "El Negro" y "El Negrito".....

Now on the gabacho/gringo issue.... Mexicans use the terms indistinctly. Wouldn't know the difference. Now if they refer to someone from Europe, they would call them "El Aleman"; El Frances"; etc. if from Spain though, they are called gachupin and that is disrespectful. But they call them gachupin anyway.
Merry Xmas to us all...




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Iflyfish
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[*] posted on 12-29-2008 at 09:19 AM


I have heard young ladies on the mainland refer to a handsome young man as a mango, sweat and succulant fruit.

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The Gull
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[*] posted on 12-29-2008 at 09:49 AM


I have heard the word mango in reference to something female.



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[*] posted on 12-29-2008 at 09:57 AM


Gull

This may well account for all the blushing I see when I use the term around young Mexican ladies? I may be making a very bad joke that I did not intend. So when I say to these young ladies "Isn't he a mango?" I may be communicating that he is a mariposa? Or is it even more convoluted than that and I am communicating that I am a mariposa? The wonder and fun of it all never cease.

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[*] posted on 1-7-2009 at 03:28 PM


A "mango" is the analogy used comparing a delicious, pretty and juicy fruit with a similarly perceived person. Thalia; Marylin Monroe; Chakira and Christina Aguilera are each one of them a perfect MANGO. Us guys, when we were young, I must add, sure were called "what a mango!" when looked at with desire by them chicks out there.... sigh...



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mulegemichael
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[*] posted on 1-7-2009 at 06:31 PM


i finally had to drop my handle from down south, mil amores, when my beautiful wife asked me what it meant...ooops...nicknames in baja are SO innocent and fun...it's a big part of daily life....my guys here in mulege take time to tell me what a new workers nickname is to make sure i refer to him in that way...really...so...from now on, i, am simply, gordo...no strings attached...



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[*] posted on 1-7-2009 at 06:35 PM


My fellow workers in Texas, who are mostly originally from the area of Guanajuato and Hidalgo, use the term gabacho in a slightly friendlier context than gringo...but as stated before--its how they use either word that's important...the "lilt" as it were. I've been called chango, gato, huero, pajaro--its all in fun and I dish it right back to them in the same vein.
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EnseNADAslim
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[*] posted on 3-3-2009 at 09:57 AM


This is a fun topic, but yea, it can take a bit getting used to when it comes to nicknames. Some that kind of shocked me at first is when parents call their children Gordo/a or Husbands and wives use that one as well.
How about the fair skin daughter/son that is called wheda/o (spelling?)
Or my worked shared this on with me, it used if you are working with someone and they "Get it Right"-like when you try to fix something, your partner will say with excitement "Ándale Whedo!"
I call my wife Rubia, she calls me...EnseLADAslim:lol:
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[*] posted on 4-6-2009 at 10:11 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Iflyfish
I have heard young ladies on the mainland refer to a handsome young man as a mango, sweat and succulant fruit.

IgordoweopescadorconfronteraespanoleP-nchegringoamigo
Quote:
Originally posted by LOSARIPES
A "mango" is the analogy used comparing a delicious, pretty and juicy fruit with a similarly perceived person. Thalia; Marylin Monroe; Chakira and Christina Aguilera are each one of them a perfect MANGO. Us guys, when we were young, I must add, sure were called "what a mango!" when looked at with desire by them chicks out there.... sigh...


I have to interject here! You are correct. :lol:

I was once called a mango by a an older Mixtec woman that was talking with me in the Puebla train station..

It was a crazy day/train ride. Mi novia laughs very much that my name here is "Mango" But, I have such good memories of being surrounded by 50 mixtec women as we communicated in Spanglishmixtec. The train was a few hours late and I literly had 500 people rolling on the ground laughing at my jokes (or me?!) :lol:
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Mango
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[*] posted on 4-6-2009 at 10:19 PM


BTW - I've been called gringo hundreds of times.. only a few of which were derogatory. It's all about context.

Just the other day I saw white scarecrows(in tyvex suits) hanging from trees with shinny foil attached to scare birds away from a vinyard.

It didn't bother me.. But; I did consider the hypocrisy/duality that is/would be involved if those tyvex suits were black and not white. (Not making a statement here.. just an observation) It's really about context and meaning! - Unfortunately; too many in the USA have knee jerk reactions. (I seriously thought of calling the NAACP just to mess with them- though, I am fully aware of the ugly racial history here and elsewhere!)
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[*] posted on 4-7-2009 at 09:02 AM


We found the really guapo guys in Baja are called Caliman. When we asked we were told should go to California to be in the movies.



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[*] posted on 8-26-2011 at 08:22 AM


Good thread. My mother-in-law, who is from Michoacan, regards "gabacho" as slightly derogatory. She prefers the term "Americano" for some reason (maybe she thinks, incorrectly, that I would be offended if she used the term gabacho..) but rarely uses the term gringo. She sees nothing wrong with the term gringo.

Here in LA I work in a community that is comprised largely of people of Central American and Mexican descent. In my occupation use of physical descriptors is very important. I almost never hear the term "gringo" here (gabacho is very common..) but hear it a lot the further south I travel in California. I have always thought this interesting since LA is not that far from the border...where gringo seems to be used a lot.
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[*] posted on 8-26-2011 at 08:30 AM
fresa


I see the term "mango" used. What does it mean when a Mexican describes a lady as a fresa? I have been told it means either an educated or high maintenance or stuck-up person..but..in taking an informal poll with my Hispanic friends and colleagues...most are not familiar with the term...
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[*] posted on 8-26-2011 at 08:31 AM


Hi Jon.....you must be on vacation to have this much time to spend in the "thread grave yard." This was a fun thread....especially with a box of beer next to the keyboard.
Good to see you.
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[*] posted on 8-26-2011 at 08:35 AM


As usual you are absolutely correct!! De-toxing for a month. Yeah..i am catching up on my 'Nomad reading. This thread is particularly interesting to me. Boring life I guess.
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[*] posted on 8-27-2011 at 07:33 AM


If you want to get me going this weekend, lets do "Gringo" or "Yankee" ;)



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1961- JFK to Canadian parliament (Edmund Burke)
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[*] posted on 8-27-2011 at 08:37 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by gnukid
native castillian spanish.



Native to where? You must be refering to Spain.
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[*] posted on 8-27-2011 at 08:40 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Woooosh
If you want to get me going this weekend, lets do "Gringo" or "Yankee" ;)


Yankees are trailing Boston by one game. Relax. They still have a month to play. :biggrin:
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[*] posted on 8-27-2011 at 09:07 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by DENNIS
Quote:
Originally posted by gnukid
native castillian spanish.



Native to where? You must be referring to Spain.


yes the roots are in spain, however, in BCS we do have some portion who speak castillian spanish and some have spanish ancestry, in fact that is the historical influence of spanish on mexico, castillian speaking conquistadors. Who is Mexico? Metzitizos of castillian, portuguese, chineses, european, american and indigenous background.

You wouldn't know it from speaking on the border or NOB, there are more than 16 verb tenses and some are different in the negative versus positive conjugation so one can understand that tendency for Gabachos to get it wrong while visiting the shops.

Funny thing, the typical person calling you gabacho couldn't understand correctly conjugated spanish, never has learned nor is interested, since in baja there is no might, could've, should've, maybe, might not have been, there is only present tense, simple future and past (copreterito and preterite).
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