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Author: Subject: SAN PEDRO MARTIR MISSION TRAIL (from space)
David K
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[*] posted on 3-4-2009 at 05:50 PM
SAN PEDRO MARTIR MISSION TRAIL (from space)


The trail was hiked in 2004 by Nomads Jack Swords, Taco de Baja, Mexitron and Pappy

Their map and GPS data is in our Baja Missions page at VivaBaja.com

The traditional way to get to the mission from the west is to reach San Isidoro after a long hike from San Antonio and the road south of Santa Cruz.

Now, with a graded road into the foothills coming up from San Quintin, via Rancho Nueva York, the hike to San Isidoro is GREATLY reduced!

Here is the overall area... near the top left corner is The Meling Ranch... see Santa Cruz and San Antonio southeast of there... The new road is dashed and pointed out with arrows marked nr-1 to nr-10. The San Isidoro trail head is nr-3 and a higher trail begins at nr-4.



Now a close up of the mission trail region:



Images marked by s-1 to s-10 +

S-1)


S-2)


S-3)


S-4 San Isidoro)


Overview from San Isidoro up a bit on the trail:


S-5) The trail begins in the stream to the south (Arroyo Campo del Oso), but crosses to Arroyo el Horno here:


S-6)


On overview of the area where the two trails meet, and beyond to the palisades (steep mountain face):


S-7) Here is the higher access trail that comes north from nr-4:



S-8) A mine entrance is along this trail between the two arroyos. Also, an old trail is seen going along the mountain ridge, uphill. :


S-9) The mission road now leaves the Arroyo and begins the steep climb up to the plateau above:


S-10)
Up the face of the palisades:


MISION SAN PEDRO MARTIR site:



[Edited on 3-5-2009 by David K]




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David K
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[*] posted on 3-4-2009 at 05:58 PM
2004 trip map


The 2004 expedition remained in the Campo del Oso stream all the way from San Isidoro to the higher cross over trail that comes up from nr-4.


More from the 2004 trip, and mission details here: http://vivabaja.com/missions2/page9.html






[Edited on 6-13-2015 by David K]




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David K
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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 05:53 PM


Jack Swords, Mexitron, Taco de Baja, Pappy... since you guys made this climb in 2004... I would like to hear about the choice of trails... did you not see the one that returned to Arroyo Horno after a short distance in Arroyo Campo del Oso... Did you see the mine on the cross-over trail?

Thanks..




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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 06:24 PM


For most of the trail either we were in arroyos or in heavy vegetation, or in heavy vegetation in arroyos. The trail selected was a result of a fire that had cleared out brush and trees, otherwise the lower trail we took to the mission would have been impassable. Photos of the plateau where the mission is located shows tree and brush skeletons resulting from the fire. It made a great opportunity to photograph the ruins that would have been obscured by brush prefire. I remember Isadora where the brush obscured the whole area and I wanted to explore this old gold mining area. All we could do was zig-zag around the brush. This is a fascinating area with mature trees, flowing streams, (we had to walk in the center of some as the sides were brushed in) and lots of ups and downs. We did find an arrastra that was about 8 ft. in diameter with the holed stones for the burro/donkey. Did not see a soul on the trip, except one grave at the marijuana plantation.
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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 07:16 PM


See if this photo posts: Evidence of the fire, but still brushy.

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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 07:17 PM


Stream crossing:
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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 07:19 PM
An arrastra


Gold mining arrastra



[Edited on 18-3-2009 by Jack Swords]
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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 08:08 PM


Arrastra

To remove gold from the rock it is in, you need to make big rocks mined into small pieces. This produced more surface area for any treatment (mercury or cyanide) or breaks out the gold pieces for panning.

An arrastra starts as a round pit lined or paved by smooth rocks on sides and bottom. Stick a vertical pole in the center (missing in the picture), then attach a horizontal pole to the top of the center pole long enough to reach to the outside of the pit and free to rotate around the pit like the hand of a horizontal clock (also missing). Don't forget to tie a heavy stone to the center of the horizontal pole so it will drag around and around the pit as the hand of the horizontal clock spins. You now have an arrastra.

Attach a burro to the outside-of-the-pit end of clock hand/horizontal pole and sweet talk him into walking in a circle around and around the outside of the pit (arrastra), throw in some large rocks and many revolutions later the heavy dragging stone will grind them into gravel with lots of surface area, then pan the gold out of the gravel and wait a century or two for cyanide to be used to dissolve the gold for later separation. :lol:




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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 08:12 PM


On Jack's left, (right in the picture) in the circle is the drag stone, identified by the two holes in it used to attach the chain or rope going to the horizontal pole.



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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 08:19 PM


Thanks Neal! Here is a lengthy explanation with modern modifications. We have found smaller mortars or arrastras in Pozo Aleman and at Desegaño and Yubay. Each of these used a steel center post. More modern gold mining techniques used stamp mills.

http://www.csuchico.edu/~rcooke/rastra.html
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[*] posted on 3-17-2009 at 08:26 PM


Sorry, Jack,
I thought you old guys went to bed early. :lol::lol::lol:

Two more years and I will be 80. Then I can really pick on people!!!




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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 06:40 AM


Hey Neal, jump in anytime! You can pick on people now! Thanks for the additional inormation. I guess I was up later than usual.
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David K
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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 09:14 AM


Love this... thanks Jack and Neal!



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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 10:55 AM
Yubay's gold




At Yubay there are several small arrastras or mortars for grinding ores. These are all using a steel center and the grinding rock has a hole in it. One has a hole in it for a stick for a handle. This particular one in the photo is inside a cave. There is another one on the outside of the cave also.
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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 11:32 AM


Thanks for explaining what that thing was...very very intruiging....gotta try that with our burro...making gravel...could be a new business opportunity!



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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 11:57 AM


Here's looking down at the Rio El Horno where the trail left to head up the steep Sierra San Miguel climb.

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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 11:59 AM


This is further up the San Miguel...

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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 12:02 PM


And here's Brooks,er, Taco de Baja near the top of the mountain and just another mile or two to the Mission SPM on the high tablelands.

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David K
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[*] posted on 3-18-2009 at 12:35 PM


Thanks for sharing these (never before seen?) on Nomad photos!



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[*] posted on 3-19-2009 at 04:50 AM


This is what's left of a little casita in the middle of the pot farm area...

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