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Author: Subject: Limiting development in Baja
jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 10:04 AM
Limiting development in Baja


All of these people that want to develop Baja continue to mention how they are going to employ so many people, give them a better life and blah blah blah.
What really happens is the development starts, the prices in all the restaurants, markets and businesses go up, the workers have a little bit of work, and then the jobs stop.
The prices continue to rise because of the foreign money and then the locals can't afford to live where they have always lived. In peace.
So, they turn to crime. Not all of them but many. It has happened in every gringo/canadian enclave in Baja. And it will continue to happen.
It happened here in Rosarito because of the Titanic movie, it's happening in Bahia de Los Angeles, Bahia Concepcion, Todos Santos and Los Cabos. Everywhere there is bunches of foreigners moving to, the thieves move right in.
Promises of 2000 jobs doesn't mean diddly when it causes exhorbitant prices on everything in the future. And these people get hungry.

Solution:
What I am doing about this is promoting certain areas to be reserves. Some for the natural beauty, some for the history, and some for growing and harvesting bamboo.
What this is doing is giving the local people permanent employment, a sense of protecting and improving the environment, a reason to keep it that way, and inexpensive building materials for their homes.
They will also be manufacturing the bamboo into usable, saleable items for their future incomes.
This project has been in the works for 2 years. I have met with many many agencies and individuals in all parts of Baja. The bamboo is growing, people are working, everyone loves the idea and what bamboo can do for the environment in so many ways.
I am trying to expand these bamboo parks to a number of areas and could use some assistance.
If anyone is interested in this idea and how they can help, send me a U2U or email at jrbaja@hotmail.com.
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jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 11:42 AM
According to your Avatar


and following resume, you'd fit right in. :lol:
One thing these guys have is a sense of humor. Once I realized they were always laughing at me instead of with me, we got along fine!:lol:
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FrankO
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 12:00 PM


That's right, I remember b4 the Titanic movie there was no crime in Rosarito. It was a Utopian paradise.
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jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 12:34 PM
You are missing the point


Before Titanic, the prices were affordable here. Most all of the locals were amazed at the price increases in all the stores when the movie came in. They didn't go down either.
Most all the border towns are crime ridden including Rosarito. Just like in the u.s., except here, it's mainly just the border towns and tourist areas rather than basically everywhere.
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Barney
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 01:27 PM


I'm no expert, But it seems to me that Baja is still a desert. This would generally indicate a lack of water, or at least a limited quantity. This being the case, where do the people(moving into these developments) plan to get an sufficient source of water?
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 06:21 PM


G's Grover how long does it take you to think these things up !!!!! I spewed beer out my nose when I saw that!!! :lol::lol::lol:



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Bajasurf
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[*] posted on 7-8-2004 at 06:27 PM
Looking for Property


When I first started to read the original post I immediately thought of Palm Desert. Change the name from Rosarito to Palm Deseret and you have the same situation.
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Skeet/Loreto
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 05:59 AM


In years past Loreto was a small village with a Generator and 1 Water Well. Ed Tabor brought in the Flying Sportsman which supplied much needed money for the Locals.

After the road opened,telephones came in, TV, etc, things started to change. Very little Crime, Glue sniffing, no DOPE.

Indians were brought over from the Mainland to build the "Presidente Hotel and Nopollo bringing in more Crime{Huotos,DOPE etc.} we had one Murder out on the Island, then n airline employee was killed, then as the DOPE hauling Business became popular, Tourism increased as well as Crime of other sorts,Outside people came in and changed the area.

More Water was needed for the Golf Course, so Waters rights were bought out in the Valle San Juan on all but 2 0r 3 Ranches which had been producing Crops.

Now there are 9 Wells in the Mountains with a limited supply of Water for Loreto and Developments.

When it was announced that a Cruise ship was going to Stop at Loreto, the price of Beer went up to $4 a Bottle!!

Sometimes Tourism is "Good" and it also brings the"Bad".

JR. I hope to meet you in Loreto, as I will be unable to see your Bamboo Ranch as I have very bad Thoughts around Bamboo,

Good Luck in your Adventure.

Skeet/Loreto

"In God I Trust"

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jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 08:05 AM
Skeet


Loreto will be fine and I hope to make it. Is the bamboo thing due to war? Because it is generally know for being one of the most peaceful plants to be around.
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sad.gif posted on 7-9-2004 at 08:17 AM
Right on, Sheet


I do remember the old days, Skeet and you are right on. What will Loreto Bay bring us. It seems to me that when you get a large group of rich foreigners, the locals only get poorer. No matter what type of government, it is still the supply and demand economics---thus leaving the poor behind. When we just had the local pueblo police, we only had a little mota around. Now, with the Federal Police in Loreto, we seem to have all the drugs....including herion, crystal, cocaine, etc. Not sure what the connection is but it sure isn't good for the young people. One of the things I always liked about Loreto was that we all lived pretty much in the same type of house. Not alot of expensive gringo houses around. Everyone sort of "fit in" with the locals. Now, we have the expensive homes down by the beach and Nopolo outside of town. Sure, Loreto Bay will bring in work for the locals---while under construction. After that, it will be housekeeping and car washing for the gringos. We complain that when the Mexicans come up here they want to bring their culture with them. But isn't that what we do when we go to their country. I escape to Loreto to get away from "keeping up with the Jones'" only to find Americans trying to outdo each other in Mexico. What is with Americans and Canadians living in groups and sorrounding their compounds with fences? Why not just move into a Mexican neighborhood and learn to live like your neighbors. When in Rome..... Oh well, I give up. I like my Mexican neighbors and learn alot from them. That is the charm of Mexico. By the way, I left a U2U for you. Please e-mail me as I don't have your e-mail address anymore.



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jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 08:50 AM
Barney


The ones that are actually serious about it rather than just another scam to steal peoples money (see Nopolo) are planning on desalinization plants.
There used to be one at Gonzaga Bay but it's been years since I've been there so don't know if it's still active.
There is one in use in San Evaristo and those guys are still alive. Course there's only about 100 of em left hahahahaha
And the army trucks in water to all the rural communities
that don't have water.
Not sure what exactly is involved with desalinization but whatever it is they do, I hope the fish and sea life like it. For some reason, I doubt it.
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 08:50 AM


Grover, I know who you are talking about. I see you are in San Diego. Come to the WindanSea Historical Surfridng Association 10th Reunion Sept 11th, 2004 at WindanSea Beach, La Jolla. I am a founding member and WindanSea surfer from the early 60's. Great event, you might get lucky and win the surfboard I build every year for this event that is raffled off or even a trip to Fijii. Not a surf contest(no sponsers allowed. I mean this is WindanSea)
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 11:08 AM


The desalinization plant probably won't do any more environmental damage than replacing native Baja ecosystems with foreign bamboo species.......
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jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 12:32 PM
As far as foreign bamboo species


all of the bamboo planted is either from Todos Santos, Los Barriles or San Bartolo.
Don't know where it came from originally but I didn't put it there. If and when I do plant "foreign" bamboo species, it will be doing nothing but good for the locals, the air, and the erosion problems suffered in that country.
Besides, the people that live here like the idea.
And the desalinization plant will help the locals how?:light:
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 12:45 PM
Right on Sharkey


Deborah and I have never been happier since we began living with our Mexicano neighbors......The more (in attitude) Mexican I become, the more content I feel.

Miss mi novia, miss mi casa, miss mi amigos.....September is not that far away.
From now on we'll only leave our casa in Mexico for 2 to 3 weeks at a time.

There's just too much of everything here, including stress. The "look at me!" casas will not find Deborah nor I in their vicinity,
not our bag........

Sharkey, Skeet.....e me at dadgcp@peoplepc.com

Look forward to hearing from you....

El Vikingo
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thumbup.gif posted on 7-9-2004 at 02:04 PM
Sharkey has a point


Sharkey,
Life in Loreto is always a treat when your neighbors are the locals. We live about 6 blocks back from the water in "Loreto Centro", and have great neighbors (and roosters y peros):lol:
The casa has always been secure when we are away. Everything is with in walking distance from the house. "Life is Good"
George, we miss you and Deborah over here at this time, but we hope to see over here on the "east" coast again:tumble:

Kristian
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 02:43 PM


Did you all know that Tijuana right now has 18,000 jobs that can't be filled? but heres the catch, almost all of them are in the maquiladora sector, and the salaries are amongst the lowest in all of Baja, something like 70dllrs a week.

Tourism and development in Baja is producing a similar situation, theres lots of projects, lots of jobs, but what is the quality of those jobs? is the local population benefiting from these jobs? are schools getting more funds? is crime going down?

I think the awnser is pretty clear, the current development of Baja is only developing the wallets of a few thousand corporations and a few fat cats, so you can't call it "Baja" development if the peninsula is really not gaining anything expect low paying dead end jobs.

Man has alays found a way to "develop" even the most dead places on earth, and they will find a way to develop Baja, water is not a problem.
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 04:00 PM


"Did you all know that Tijuana right now has 18,000 jobs that can't be filled?"

Maybe 18,000 resident visas for Chinese workers just might be the ticket. I'm sure it would help out those poor Chinese families to escape the crushing povery in their own country; they would jump at even $65.00 per week.
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 04:07 PM


I'll bet the native plants aren't crazy about being ripped up for bamboo......there is no native bamboo in Baja--reeds, yes--and if it escapes into the local waterways--ever heard of Arundo donax or Tamarisk aphylla? Bamboo, though, I'll say rarely flowers, so there's less of a chance of it escaping.
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jrbaja
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[*] posted on 7-9-2004 at 04:18 PM
The key issue here


as far as bamboo ruining the fragile Baja ecosystem, is that it is good for the environment, it is good for the people that live here, it can be used for countless projects, it can be eaten, and it is natural.
Unlike pavement and condos, it is nice to look at, provides shade in the heat, gives people jobs, and is one of the most earthquake and hurricane resistant building materials on the planet.
The people here that know of what they speak like the idea. The locals like the idea. And it's already happening.
As far as the bamboo "escaping". It has been growing down there for years. As I said before, I didn't put it there. But somebody sure did. A long long time ago.
If some people want to find fault with this , it figures. That's why they have gringo enclaves. So you don't even have to know about the people of Baja and what their needs and desires are. It sure as hell isn't pink friggen condos.
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