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Author: Subject: Named Wildflowers of Baja 2012
standingwave
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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 01:27 PM
Named Wildflowers of Baja 2012


If these pics are too big for comfortable display on your screen there are smaller ones here

Thanks goes to ecomujeres for identifying the plants in these pictures.

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As time and fortune pleased all six of my previous winter trips to Baja were dry ones. This year was different. Four hard rains came in November and promised an explosion of colour. For your enjoyment here are some pictures taken as the desert bloomed. I've found a few names, please add any that you know.

Only once did the rain fall during the day. This early morning downpour had muddy rivers running from the campground to the ocean in a matter of minutes.
1. Rain! :-)

2. Lotus, trefoil of some kind (Lotus sp.) 

3. Harfordia macroptera

4. Bolsa de Conejo (Harfordia Macroptera) Rabbit's Purse


5. Harfordia macroptera

6. Wishbone plant (Mirabilis sp., such as M. crassifolia)

7. Wishbone plant (Mirabilis sp., such as M. crassifolia)

8. Solanum hindsianum
Mariola (Solanum Hindsianum) Nightshade


9. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum sp.)

10. Storksbill, Filaree (Erodium cicutarium)

11. Storksbill, Filaree (Erodium cicutarium)

12. Palo Adan (or Ocotillo) flower (Fouquieria splendens or F. diguetii)

13. Cochemiea, biznagita (Cochemiea sp.) 

14. Barrel cactus (Ferocactus sp.)

15. from what little of the plant that is visible, it looks like a Hedgehog cactus. Species with yellow flowers is Echinocereus maritimus, very common in the area you described.

16. Fish hook cactus (Mammillaria dioica)

17. Coastal agave leaves (Agave shawii) 

18. Coastal agave flowers (Agave shawii)

19. Coastal agave new inflorescences (Agave shawii)

20. Guayacán (Viscainoa geniculata)

21. Evening primrose (Camissonia sp.)

22. Marigold (likely Dyssodia anthemidifolia, “fetid” marigold)

23. Looks like a species of brittlebush (Encelia sp.)

24. Apricot globemallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua)
Mal de Ojo (Sphaeraicea Ambigua) Desert Mallow, Desert Hollyhock


25. Coreocarpus parthenioides var. parthenioides

26. Desert dandelion (Malacothrix californica)

27. Desert dandelion (Malacothrix californica)

28. Crystalline Iceplant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum)

29. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum sp.) looks like the same as #9

30. Cliff spurge (Euphorbia misera)

31. Sand mat (Euphorbia sp.)

32. Blue sand lily (Triteliopsis palmeri) 
http://www.gf.state.az.us/w_c/edits/documents/Tritpalm.d.pdf

33. Blue sand lily (Triteliopsis palmeri)

34. Sand verbena (Abronia umbellatum is my guess from what I can see of non-hairy leaves) Nyctaginaceae=4-o’clock family

35. Verbena sp. (not related to #34, Verbenaceae=verbena family)


36. Tronador (Cardiospermum corindum)


37. Lichen

38. a closeup of the leaves of Erodium, #10-11 (or perhaps the leaves of Chia (Salvia columbariae))

39. Grass is Saltcedar (Monanthochloe littoralis) and fleshy plant is Saltwort (Batis maritima)

40. Seablite (looks like Suaeda esteroa)

41. new leaves of slenderleaf iceplant (Mesembryanthemum nodiflorum)

42. bead-like, red leaves of Seaside Calandrinia (Cistanthe maritima)

43. Drawing a blank on the red-leafed plant, but pictured with a prickly, white-flowered species of the borage family, such as Cryptantha sp.


Dodder (Cuscuta sp.), orange thready stems and whitish buds parasitizing an underlying annual Portulaca species


45. flower and mature leaves of Seaside Calandrinia (#42)

46. Crystalline Iceplant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum)


[Edited on 5-23-2012 by standingwave]

[Edited on 5-23-2012 by standingwave]

[Edited on 5-25-2012 by standingwave]






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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 01:38 PM


holy smokes !!! those are amazingly beautiful !!

thanks so much for sharing

like like like




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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 01:50 PM


Those coral/mushroom like plants look amazing. No chlorophyll? I think I've seen them in death valley.
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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 02:32 PM


Thank you for sharing your beautiful photos of flowers. Very impressive!
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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 02:59 PM
Flowers


Very nice photos, thanks for sharing them.



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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 03:38 PM


good job Ken. that was some rain alright!



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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 04:46 PM


Wow---beautiful pics!!! Thanks for sharing...the "tanglefoot" vine is Dodder (Cuscuta sp.) which is a parasitic species.
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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 05:02 PM


Beautiful photos!

Where were you?




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standingwave
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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 08:44 PM


Hey, Woody, getting any waves? or is it all fishing these days?
Thank you, Mexitron, for the info. I've added it to the photo. Wikipedia has quite a collection of folk names for this plant! "devil's guts, devil's hair, devil's ringlet, goldthread, hailweed, hairweed, hellbine, love vine, pull-down, strangleweed, angel hair, and witch's hair"
Danaeb, the pics were taken along the Pacific coast in Central Baja, ranging from the north side of Laguna Ojo de Liebre to the area around Santa Rosalillita.






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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 11:20 PM


Very NICE!



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[*] posted on 5-22-2012 at 11:24 PM


Happy to ID these for you, but the photos are so large that they are too big for my screen. It would improve all of our viewing pleasure if we could see them in a smaller format.

First one is a Lotus. The pale pink one below the Harfordia is a Mirabilis.




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[*] posted on 5-23-2012 at 09:21 AM


Yes, thank you for so many beautiful photos!

As ecomujeres mentioned, they do exceed the Nomad requested max. of 800 pixelss wide, so those here with standard monitors must scroll off the screen to enjoy and read the thread.

You are using Photobucket, as do I, and the process is so easy!

Before you upload from your PC to Photobucket, click the link (in blue) 'Customize your upload options' in the Upload to Photobucket pop up. Then pick from the choices:

100x75
160x120
320x240
640x480
800x600
1024x768

800 is the max. and I use that for maps to show the most detail and tiny writing, and 640 is maybe the best for most photos.

Click SAVE and now upload to your album at a Nomad friendly size!

Thanks again for the great photos and sharing here!




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[*] posted on 5-23-2012 at 12:33 PM


WOW
I like 'em big!




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[*] posted on 5-23-2012 at 01:38 PM
Thank You!!!


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[*] posted on 5-23-2012 at 05:50 PM


OK, here goes…

1. Rain!
2. Lotus, trefoil of some kind (Lotus sp.)
3. Harfordia macroptera
4. Harfordia macroptera
5. Harfordia macroptera
6. Wishbone plant (Mirabilis sp., such as M. crassifolia)
7. Wishbone plant (Mirabilis sp., such as M. crassifolia)
8. Solanum hindsianum
9. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum sp.)
10. Storksbill, Filaree (Erodium cicutarium)
11. Storksbill, Filaree (Erodium cicutarium)
12. Palo Adan (or Ocotillo) flower (Fouquieria splendens or F. diguetii) [depending how far south you were when you took the photo and habit of the plant].
13. Cochemiea, biznagita (Cochemiea sp.)
14. Barrel cactus (Ferocactus sp.)
15. from what little of the plant that is visible, it looks like a Hedgehog cactus. Species with yellow flowers is Echinocereus maritimus, very common in the area you described.
16. Fish hook cactus (Mammillaria dioica)
17. Coastal agave leaves (Agave shawii)
18. Coastal agave flowers (Agave shawii)
19. Coastal agave new inflorescences (Agave shawii)
20. Guayacán (Viscainoa geniculata)
21. Evening primrose (Camissonia sp.)
22. Marigold (likely Dyssodia anthemidifolia, “fetid” marigold)
23. Looks like a species of brittlebush (Encelia sp.)
24. Apricot globemallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua)
25. Coreocarpus parthenioides var. parthenioides
26. Desert dandelion (Malacothrix californica)
27. Desert dandelion (Malacothrix californica)
28. Crystalline Iceplant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum)
29. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum sp.) looks like the same as #9
30. Cliff spurge (Euphorbia misera)
31. Sand mat (Euphorbia sp.)
32. Blue sand lily (Triteliopsis palmeri)
http://www.gf.state.az.us/w_c/edits/documents/Tritpalm.d.pdf

33. Blue sand lily (Triteliopsis palmeri)
34. Sand verbena (Abronia umbellatum is my guess from what I can see of non-hairy leaves) Nyctaginaceae=4-o’clock family
35. Verbena sp. (not related to #34, Verbenaceae=verbena family)
36. Tronador (Cardiospermum corindum)
37. Lichen
38. looks like leaves of Chia (Salvia columbariae)
39. Grass is Saltcedar (Monanthochloe littoralis) and fleshy plant is Saltwort (Batis maritima)
40. Seablite (looks like Suaeda esteroa)
41. new leaves of slenderleaf iceplant (Mesembryanthemum nodiflorum)
42. bead-like, red leaves of Seaside Calandrinia (Cistanthe maritima)
43. Drawing a blank on the red-leafed plant, but pictured with a prickly, white-flowered species of the borage family, such as Cryptantha sp.
44. Dodder (Cuscuta sp., orange thready stems and whitish buds parasitizing an underlying annual Portulaca species
45. flower and mature leaves of Seaside Calandrinia (#42)
46. Crystalline Iceplant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum)

You can visit http://www.calflora.org and find more info about some of the species listed above.

Thanks for the great photos. You must have a fantastic macro to get such terrific closeups of some of the tiny (belly) plants.




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[*] posted on 5-23-2012 at 06:13 PM


PS. Thanks for the smaller photo page. Just discovered it, as I had this page in a tab so I could find it again quickly to work on the list.

And as I see Photo #38 in smaller version and check my photo archive, I think it is just a closeup of the leaves of Erodium, #10-11.




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Check out: http://www.meloncoyote.org (project of Journalism to Raise Environmental Awareness; a quarterly news bulletin for the Gulf of California Region).
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[*] posted on 5-24-2012 at 05:47 PM


I've rewritten the original post to add the names supplied by ecomujeres to the pictures.





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[*] posted on 5-25-2012 at 12:45 PM


ThanksWave!
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