BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3  
Author: Subject: bacquito
nandopedal
Nomad
**




Posts: 114
Registered: 6-1-2010
Location: San Diego Ca
Member Is Offline

Mood: Negra Modelo

[*] posted on 5-31-2013 at 11:40 AM


Thanks David, I forgot to describe so here it goes: The first two are looking NE and SE respectively, third one is looking straight towards the observatory, 4th one is.......wait a minute, what is that guy doing there? somebody probably gave him the wrong info he is too far from the border fence:tumble: And the last one is looking straight South, enjoy!



\"There are many dangers in Baja. The most serious of which is not going.\" Christophe Noel (EXPO)
View user's profile
nandopedal
Nomad
**




Posts: 114
Registered: 6-1-2010
Location: San Diego Ca
Member Is Offline

Mood: Negra Modelo

[*] posted on 5-31-2013 at 11:44 AM


Wohoo! I just made "junior" do that means I get a pony ride at the fair?



\"There are many dangers in Baja. The most serious of which is not going.\" Christophe Noel (EXPO)
View user's profile
Graham
Nomad
**




Posts: 494
Registered: 6-16-2006
Location: San Diego and DeTour, MI
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-31-2013 at 12:21 PM


Thanks David for posting Fernando's pics and the link to Baja Andy's panoramas and pics. Wonderful shots from the top of Baja.

Helps me appreciate even more the achievement of those two young men who we met on our trip.

On May 25 they set out at midnight from the Padre Kino camping area planning to hike from the plateau down to the bottom of Canyon Diablo and immediately up to the top of Picacho del Diablo and back again to Padre Kino... all in under 24 hours!

Their goal was to establish an officially verified and sanctioned record, and possibly make it into the Guinness Book of Records.

Victor Manuel Lopez Meza, age 31, (Rayo de Ensenada) had been to Picacho peak 7 times, and has been traveling and guiding on and around the mountain for over 10 years.

His companion Luis Felipe Vea Ávalos, age 23 (Skywalker) had met Victor and committed himself to the project just a month before. But in that time he prepared and trained hard every day. It was his first climb of Picacho.

An unexpected and worrying problem they had early on was with their headlights. Night travel in such wild and rugged conditions was hazardous enough, but when their lights started to fail they lost 45 minutes finding a fix and were fearful they would not be able to set the record.

After they had reached the top of Picacho Diablo, and were heading back down tired and thirsty, there was another anxious time as Felipe developed cramps in his legs. Victor said he was motivated both by establishing the record and ensuring that Felipe made it safely back as his mother and father were waiting for him in camp.

After overcoming their problems and successfully completing their journey, both Victor and Felipe humbly expressed their gratitude to each other, and to all the people who helped them reach their goal.


Victor and Felipe greeted by Felipe's father on their return


Felipe and Victor enjoying some well-deserved ceviche


Victor and his 4 year old son and Felipe signing a poster for me... exhausted support team member in between


They acknowledged that they could not have done it without their six man support team out there awaiting them at Botella Azul, Campo Noche, and on Picacho itself with food, water, and medicine.


Two of the support team return and are united with their families


They were also grateful for the support and backing of the San Pedro Mártir park authorities who made available access to the Padre Kino area and all park facilities. And they were sending Spot location signals via satellite to the park authorities and also mountain rescue teams in the area who were ready to assist if needed.

But, above all, both men sincerely thanked their families and friends who were there to cheer them off into the night and anxiously await their return. That moral support clearly meant everything and it was wonderful to be there for the emotional cheers, hugs, and tears as the record setters (and later their support crews) wandered back from their exertions and adventures.


Event poster and official recognition certificate

Parque Nacional San Pedro Mártir personnel issued them an official certificate verifying that they had returned in less than 24 hours. Indeed, they made the journey in an amazing 15 hours and 25 minutes, much of it in the dark, a mind-blowing achievement to all those who know the terrain.



A privilege to be a part of it

The joy and celebrations were infectious… and these wonderful people kindly and graciously invited Roger, Ronnie and me – we had just returned exhausted from our own hike - to join them for a revitalizing delicious forest banquet of quesadillas, ceviche, beans and salsa.

It was a day and an event to remember, and I wish “Rayo de Ensenada” and “Skywalker” good luck and happy trails for all their future adventures and record setting events.

Their next is likely to be hiking up Canyon Diablo to the peak and then up to the park from there.

Also on the cards is an attempt to pedal all around the perimeter of Mexico.




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 5-31-2013 at 03:33 PM


Thank you Graham... wonderful adventure indeed!



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
BornFisher
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1648
Registered: 1-11-2005
Location: K-38 Santa Martha/Encinitas
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-31-2013 at 04:20 PM


Damn guys---- great try!! Graham-- amazing reports and photos. Seems like every time you go up to the park, something great happens!!
View user's profile
Desert Rat
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 53
Registered: 8-29-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-31-2013 at 09:14 PM


Hello fellow nomads. I just returned from the two day drive from Roger´s home in Ensenada. First chance I´ve had to check in with Bajanomad and was pleasantly surprised to see how quickly Graham had composed a report of the trip. Graham´s report touched on the major events of the trip and is well done. I have nothing more to add other than to say thank you to Graham, Roger, and all the nomads who gave suggestions, etc., for our benefit. If you have never been to San Pedro Mártir Parque and want to see an amazing place, then please give yourself a treat and GO!
View user's profile
Kgryfon
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 624
Registered: 1-27-2009
Location: East Bay, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2013 at 03:27 AM


"As they say, the journey is sometimes more important than the destination. It was a peak experience even if we didn’t make it to the top of Baja."

Well said. The entire adventure sounds amazing and I thank you for posting it. It's good to know your limits and you had a great adventure nonetheless! Cheers to you and your hiking mates!
View user's profile
Ateo
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 5470
Registered: 7-18-2011
Location: Oceanside
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-2-2013 at 04:05 PM


I was really stoked to read this thread. You guys gave it your best and that's all you can do. I really respect this type of stuff. Thanks.



Headed South.
View user's profile
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 10735
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 6-2-2013 at 07:54 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Desert Rat
Maderita, I made it a point to talk to a ranger concerning the requirement for a certified guide to hike and climb Picacho from the Parque. He said that a guide is absolutely required and that the guides certification paper will be checked. And no, we did not go covert.


Really!? Who did you enlist as guide? What certification are they looking for?
View user's profile
Maderita
Nomad
**




Posts: 209
Registered: 12-14-2008
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2013 at 01:25 PM


Desert Rat,
I'm confused. You stated, "...a guide is absolutely required..." and, "...we did not go covert".
That seems to imply that you had an officially recognized guide.
Then you wrote, "No guide was enlisted for the trip".
What am I missing?
View user's profile
Graham
Nomad
**




Posts: 494
Registered: 6-16-2006
Location: San Diego and DeTour, MI
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2013 at 02:18 PM


Yes, I think the situation IS confused. If you read the early exchanges in this thread, we were trying to clarify if a guide is necessary or not. And sometimes, I've found, you'll get slightly different answers from different rangers, and maybe different answers from the same ranger depending on who is asking the question, and how you ask the question!

I think they might cut you some slack if you're obviously well equipped, have experience, and are in possession of a Spot device or similar.

What is certain is the route to Picacho is extremely rugged, remote and hazardous, and the park staff have seen several cases of people breaking bones, getting lost, or otherwise getting into trouble and requiring rescue. And they absolutely have a right to try to minimize the number of these misadventures.

I'm looking forward to getting back to the park soon and exploring a little more in the direction of Canyon Diablo.

I'll try to get a more definitive answer... if there is one.




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Desert Rat
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 53
Registered: 8-29-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2013 at 08:12 PM


Maderita and others. I understand the confusion caused by my succinct statement concerning the fact that we did not go covert. The question was, "Did we go covert?" and I simply answered, "No, we did not go covert". I neglected to explain in detail as to why. As Graham mentioned, the rangers might cut you some slack if...well equipped, experienced, possess a Spot device, etc.

A major event that took place at the Parque played a big part in helping the rangers decide to allow us to make the Picacho attempt without our own guide.

During the time that we would be on the trail to Picacho, there were four different groups of climbers with guides on the route, also. One group was there to support two men who were attempting to set a time record for the fastest ascent of Picacho. The support group members were stationed at the three critical points on the route to the summit. A doctor was in the group, also.

From the trailhead to the summit, hikers and guides would be strung out along the route to Picacho. This practically assured the rangers that help would not be far away if needed. The decision was made to allow us to make an attempt.

I apologize for confusing the issue earlier.
View user's profile
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 10735
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 6-3-2013 at 08:21 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Graham
Yes, I think the situation IS confused. If you read the early exchanges in this thread, we were trying to clarify if a guide is necessary or not. And sometimes, I've found, you'll get slightly different answers from different rangers, and maybe different answers from the same ranger depending on who is asking the question, and how you ask the question!.


...and sometime it is better to not ask the question and so never get an answer!

Have not been there in about a year,... Is the road to padre kino CG still in good shape and passable for normal cars? Still pretty safe to park cars there overnite when hiking back country?

P.s. nice trip,reports,... Love the plateau, always a good time in the park
View user's profile
Maderita
Nomad
**




Posts: 209
Registered: 12-14-2008
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2013 at 09:33 PM


Desert Rat,
Certainly no apology needed. Thanks for clarifying the issue. It's what I guessed - that the ranger has some discretion on the policy which requires a guide.

It seems the rangers are trying to sort the experienced from the unprepared noobies. Their "guide required" solution may have an unintended and opposite outcome. Guides will bring in more people who would otherwise not undertake the climb. Radios, SPOT, and satellite phones lead to more people requesting rescue and costly emergency evacuation. In the old days, if you got yourself into a predicament, you had to get yourself out, with rare exceptions.



[Edited on 6-4-2013 by Maderita]
View user's profile
Graham
Nomad
**




Posts: 494
Registered: 6-16-2006
Location: San Diego and DeTour, MI
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-4-2013 at 09:02 AM


I've been traveling to the San Pedro Martir for 20 years and it's been interesting to see the changes in the park and the increasing amount of regulation and enforcement... especially since the ease of access with the paved road.

It's been a place I've always enjoyed taking my dogs in the summer... plenty of cool places for them to run free and play... and I've never seen a rattlesnake or scorpion up there... though I have seen bobcats, a cougar, and numerous coyotes.

I've always found the park staff to be helpful and reasonable, and I've always felt very safe and secure parked inside the park - perhaps because of the need to sign in and out at the park gate and pay an entrance fee?

Not once has my vehicle or campsite been molested... and I spent four months in Padre Kino in 2001 when I wrote "Nearer My Dog to Thee."

As I mentioned in the book... I was sometimes the only guest in the park and once I even became the ranger in charge as the only official had to leave for a day or two! A few hours after this unexpected promotion I noted with alarm a large forest fire burning to the west! Such were the good old days!

The road to Padre Kino is generally OK but there are a couple of small arroyos to cross that would make car access difficult. You will need high clearance.

The main vehicle controls in the park are the locked gates... this is the one on the road to Padre Kino, about a mile from the main trailhead to Blue Bottle and Picacho




Because of all the activity Desert Rat mentions - May is perhaps the main month to climb Picacho from the park - it was open when we were there.

But don't be surprised if you find the chain in place and locked.




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 10735
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 6-4-2013 at 09:17 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Graham

The main vehicle controls in the park are the locked gates... this is the one on the road to Padre Kino, about a mile from the main trailhead to Blue Bottle and Picacho

But don't be surprised if you find the chain in place and locked.


it seems the hike to picacho diablo and blue bottle peak area is now 1 mile longer :lol::lol::lol:

i have noticed that the park does more things each year to keep people from venturing much off the main road :(:(

thanks for info :bounce:
View user's profile
bacquito
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1615
Registered: 3-6-2007
Member Is Offline

Mood: jubilado

[*] posted on 6-4-2013 at 09:54 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Maderita
Desert Rat,
Certainly no apology needed. Thanks for clarifying the issue. It's what I guessed - that the ranger has some discretion on the policy which requires a guide.

It seems the rangers are trying to sort the experienced from the unprepared noobies. Their "guide required" solution may have an unintended and opposite outcome. Guides will bring in more people who would otherwise not undertake the climb. Radios, SPOT, and satellite phones lead to more people requesting rescue and costly emergency evacuation. In the old days, if you got yourself into a predicament, you had to get yourself out, with rare exceptions.





[Edited on 6-4-2013 by Maderita]


As I recall, when we were leaving the park the question regarding whether a guide was needed at the park and it was stated a guide was needed but but that Graham was considered a qualified guide.

[Edited on 6-4-2013 by bacquito]




bacquito
View user's profile
Vince
Nomad
**




Posts: 412
Registered: 10-17-2006
Location: Coronado
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-4-2013 at 05:40 PM


Graham, thanks for the adventure! Fun reading about that area and to know it is still a challenge. As Barry noted, we visited Blue Bottle Ridge several times with Bud Bernhard and the Sierra Club in the early '50's. He was a real pioneer in that area, a great climber. It was fun to go with him when he was younger, but I heard the heat really bothered him in later life, early '70's in age. He had to be helped out of the area. I climbed Picacho with him in the late 1950s when he was at his peak. He hauled a transit on his back and measured both peaks to their relative height, one was like 6 feet higher. Can't remember which one. We stayed on the south peak and he left, carrying the instrument all the way over to the north peak while we held the measuring device and he scoped it. Then he rescued the Kellog kids from La Jolla after that (they were lost on the mountain). One of them wrote DEVIL'S MOUNTAIN.
View user's profile
bacquito
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1615
Registered: 3-6-2007
Member Is Offline

Mood: jubilado

[*] posted on 6-4-2013 at 07:57 PM




I have not posted pictures in such a long time so I am stumbling along. Graham and Ron on our recent trip to Parque Pedro San Martir.

[Edited on 6-5-2013 by bacquito]

[Edited on 6-5-2013 by bacquito]




bacquito
View user's profile
bacquito
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1615
Registered: 3-6-2007
Member Is Offline

Mood: jubilado

[*] posted on 6-4-2013 at 08:16 PM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsXFI8tH6PE

This is from You Tube and is a shortened video from the done I sent to You Tube. But none the less it is interesting




bacquito
View user's profile
 Pages:  1    3  

  Go To Top


For high speed satellite internet in Baja call +1.6197170810 - or click here to email sistemassatelitales@hotmail.com



Tijuana Walking Tours - on Meetup.com


 






All Content Copyright © 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group 






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

 

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

 

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

 

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262