BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2    4  ..  24
Author: Subject: Salsipuedes Canyon by Fatbike
motoged
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 5246
Registered: 7-31-2006
Location: Kamloops, BC
Member Is Online

Mood: Gettin' Better

[*] posted on 12-2-2013 at 11:55 PM


I am still waiting to see someone ride it in soft sand guys....downhill for 50 feet doesn't do it....

I like the concept and get it that it's a fun bike, but all the vids are on wet sand (the San Juanico sand chute and rocks aside).

No disrespect....just doubt about the sand wash travel unless hardpacked.... :cool:




Don't believe everything you think....
View user's profile
elgatoloco
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3825
Registered: 11-19-2002
Location: Yes
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 12:07 AM


Perfect Baja bike. Good times.



Land of the Free because of the Brave!! Support our troops and their loved ones!! Life is too short to drink lousy tequila! Don't sweat the small stuff. "Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference" - Mark Twain
View user's profile
Skipjack Joe
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 7312
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Half Moon Bay
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 01:26 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Then the plan is to packraft / ride the beach back down the coast to La Gringa, catching fish as I go. If the winds are really bad I can go up some other washes instead and ride back through the dry lakes north of Bay of LA.



Yes, you better just ride through the dry lake beds because there is very little opportunity to ride along the coast. The few beaches are far between. The packraft doesn't seem to be very seaworthy to me. You should think over the idea of paddling a raft along that section of the coastline in my opinion.
View user's profile
woody with a view
PITA Nomad
********




Posts: 15877
Registered: 11-8-2004
Location: Looking at the Coronado Islands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Everchangin'

[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 06:55 AM


what happens to the bike when you are rafting? does it lay on the raft? is there a foto of ytour raft/trailer/bike somewhere that i missed?



View user's profile
larryC
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1260
Registered: 8-11-2008
Location: BoLA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 08:22 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC
That's an interesting setup dagona. Interestingly I am at a steam conference today.

Regarding the safety of the trip, the main concerns are if I get a flat. But I will inject stan's goop into the tubes. Most of the ride is sandy wash with no cactus. Sand is no problem to ride over with a fatbike. Also, the tricky areas will be on days 2 and 3 at the head of the canyon do easy to backtrack out if there's a problem. And once in the canyon, the worst ill have to do is hike 20 km out to the ocean, no big deal.

If I get attacked by coyotes or bitten by a snake, well I'll have to deal with it. That's what the spot is for. Yesterday i practiced hauling 20 l on my trailer, you barely even feel it.



Not sure what you are envisioning up at the top of the canyons, but you can expect to be lifting and lowering your bike and trailer up and over 20' and 40' rocks and down some 40'+ cliffs before you get to the sandy wash part. Some of the canyon is easy going and some is not. I ran my quad into some quick sand and if I had been alone I would have lost it. We just had an all day rain here about 2 weeks ago so you will probably find some water up there.
Salsipuedes and Asamblea canyons start up there. Asamblea starts at the end of the road. The road actually goes a kilometer or 2 down into the canyon. At the end of the road is where all the huge granite rocks are, similar in appearance to the rocks around Catavina. Salsipuedes starts before the end of the road and is not marked, at least wasn't when I was last up there. Salsipuedes is the more interesting of the 2 canyons. You are going to have a real adventure, wish I was going to be around to help.
Larry




Off grid, 12-190watt evergreen solar panels on solar trackers, 2-2812 stacked Outback inverters, 6-2v enersys 125-33 2000 amp hour AGM batteries, FM 80 and MX 60 Outback charge controllers, X-240 Outback transformer for 220v from inverter, 6500 watt Kubota diesel generator.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53642
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 08:34 AM


Use Google Earth to study the coastline... Except for Guadalupe Bay, not any beach north of La Gringa to Arroyo La Asamblea. You can drive/ride from Arroyo Los Candeleros to Laguna Seca and Laguna Agua Amarga out to the L.A. Bay highway.





"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
larryC
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1260
Registered: 8-11-2008
Location: BoLA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 08:47 AM


About 3 miles south of the entrance to the canyons there is one small sandy beach where you could make landfall. There is/was also a small shack used seasonally by commercial fishermen on the beach. From there to Candeleros the coast is pretty rugged. He is going to have to be pretty careful while in the raft along the rugged parts of the coast, cause if the wind comes up it could get tricky. We get some pretty serious north winds that time of year.
Larry




Off grid, 12-190watt evergreen solar panels on solar trackers, 2-2812 stacked Outback inverters, 6-2v enersys 125-33 2000 amp hour AGM batteries, FM 80 and MX 60 Outback charge controllers, X-240 Outback transformer for 220v from inverter, 6500 watt Kubota diesel generator.
View user's profile
Santiago
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3193
Registered: 8-27-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 12:18 PM


Since you have a Spot, arrange with someone to come pick you up by boat?
View user's profile
Barry A.
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 9792
Registered: 11-30-2003
Location: Redding, Northern CA
Member Is Offline

Mood: optimistic

[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 12:49 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Santiago
Since you have a Spot, arrange with someone to come pick you up by boat?


----or, as an alternative, there is a reported fairly good dirt veh. track (not on Baja Atlas maps) that comes from the west (NE end of Valle Laguna Seca) down Los Candeleros wash to the Gulf about 1 mile north of Punta Candelero, as I understand it. This wash/road is about 10 miles south of the mouth of Asamblea/Salsipuedes wash. I don't know if this "10 miles" is hike-able, tho (cliffs?) and this area is very mountainous.

I have never personally seen this "reported" road.

Barry

[Edited on 12-3-2013 by Barry A.]

[Edited on 12-3-2013 by Barry A.]
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53642
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 03:55 PM


Barry, I drew the roads onto the Almanac map (just a couple posts up) from my personal experience driving on it about 10 years ago. The drive to both Candeleros and Guadalupe Bay was all done in 2WD (Tacoma) with ease... but it was winter and the arroyo sand may have been damper than usual.

The mileage from the L.A. Bay highway to the T junction (Arroyo Mesa de Yubay) is 13.5

T Junction to Bahia Guadalupe is 9.8 miles.

T Junction to Punta Candelero is 19.6 miles.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Barry A.
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 9792
Registered: 11-30-2003
Location: Redding, Northern CA
Member Is Offline

Mood: optimistic

[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 06:00 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by David K
Barry, I drew the roads onto the Almanac map (just a couple posts up) from my personal experience driving on it about 10 years ago. The drive to both Candeleros and Guadalupe Bay was all done in 2WD (Tacoma) with ease... but it was winter and the arroyo sand may have been damper than usual.

The mileage from the L.A. Bay highway to the T junction (Arroyo Mesa de Yubay) is 13.5

T Junction to Bahia Guadalupe is 9.8 miles.

T Junction to Punta Candelero is 19.6 miles.


Ooops, I now see that, David. Sorry for the duplication, and knee-jerk post.

Barry
View user's profile
Mark_BC
Nomad
**




Posts: 121
Registered: 12-1-2013
Location: Vancouver, BC
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2013 at 07:30 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by larryC

Not sure what you are envisioning up at the top of the canyons, but you can expect to be lifting and lowering your bike and trailer up and over 20' and 40' rocks and down some 40'+ cliffs before you get to the sandy wash part. Some of the canyon is easy going and some is not. I ran my quad into some quick sand and if I had been alone I would have lost it. We just had an all day rain here about 2 weeks ago so you will probably find some water up there.
Salsipuedes and Asamblea canyons start up there. Asamblea starts at the end of the road. The road actually goes a kilometer or 2 down into the canyon. At the end of the road is where all the huge granite rocks are, similar in appearance to the rocks around Catavina. Salsipuedes starts before the end of the road and is not marked, at least wasn't when I was last up there. Salsipuedes is the more interesting of the 2 canyons. You are going to have a real adventure, wish I was going to be around to help.
Larry


That's my biggest concern, having to contend with the big rocks. At least that will only be a couple days in and not far from the road. I'll bring rope.

Now I have to worry about quicksand too! Never experienced it myself except watching on Gilligan's Island. There is a lot of flotation with these tires and the bike isn't heavy so I should be able to haul it out if it gets stuck. Regarding concerns about riding in loose sand, the bike really can handle it fine, not an issue, it's surprising how easy it is. The trailer might be a bit of a problem though since it won't accept a big fat tire. I'll put the fattest one I can in there and experiment with it next weekend. If there's water that will help because then I won't have to haul as much in the trailer, and lighten its load.

Someone earlier wondered about the stability of the packraft -- yes, it's very stable. I have actually done whitewater rivers in it (that's what it's made for, among other things like hauling a moose out of the bush), with my bike strapped to the front! And most of my gear can go inside the tubes. I don't know if I posted a link before, but here it is:

https://www.alpackaraft.com/index.cfm/store.catalog/Packraft...

True American innovation!

But if I get stuck in those strong winds out on the water that could be a problem. I've experienced them before.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Skipjack Joe
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 7312
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Half Moon Bay
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-4-2013 at 12:55 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Mark_BC

Someone earlier wondered about the stability of the packraft -- yes, it's very stable. I have actually done whitewater rivers in it (that's what it's made for, among other things like hauling a moose out of the bush), with my bike strapped to the front! And most of my gear can go inside the tubes. I don't know if I posted a link before, but here it is:

https://www.alpackaraft.com/index.cfm/store.catalog/Packraft...

True American innovation!

But if I get stuck in those strong winds out on the water that could be a problem. I've experienced them before.


Yes, that's the concern. Any wind will blow you around like a sail. Even rowing on a calm day will be a major chore because it's not hydrodynamic.

I still think you should work your way south inland, following the low flat areas as much as is available. In looking at google earth it seems that there is a fairly small relatively easy climb from the head of the canyon to an arm leading into the dry lake south of it. Once you reach that lake you can proceed back to the coast near Pt Remedios and have a section of sandy beach south of there.

If you plan to fish for food concentrate on the rocky points. Don't bother with the sandy beaches. We used large rapalas and swimbaits for leopard grouper from shore. They're in the suds by the rocks. Find a rockpile that's protruding from 4 feet of water and about 30 feet from shore. Work the lures around it's edges. Don't be enticed by those deep rocks you will see from the ledges. This we learned from experience.

If you have bait you can just chuck and wait. And probably catch more and a greater variety of fish.

Bring tire repair equipment. There is a cactus (I believe it's chainlink cactus) that breaks off it's tips and lay on the ground next to it. Some grow right next to the dirt road and these 'links' often end up on the road itself. They are really difficult to see. I had to use needlenose pliers to remove them from the tire because of the barbs on each spine.
View user's profile
larryC
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1260
Registered: 8-11-2008
Location: BoLA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-4-2013 at 08:54 AM


Mark
I didn't mean to imply that you won't be able to make it because of quicksand, I just mentioned it because water is so rare to find down here. I think I posted a picture of the sunken quad in my original thread.
Larry

Joe
If you are talking about the Botica wash, that is where ESG had to lower his packjacks down a cliff. I climbed that cliff and walked up toward the dry lake but ran out of daylight and had to turn back before I got to the top. Once over the cliff then it was easy going up the wide flat wash. According to ESG in Hoovering over Baja, once you get to the top at the dry lake then you still have a pretty rough hill or 2 to get over before you drop down into the dry lake that is part of Candeleros wash.

If this place was easy to get into then there would be a resort in there.
Larry




Off grid, 12-190watt evergreen solar panels on solar trackers, 2-2812 stacked Outback inverters, 6-2v enersys 125-33 2000 amp hour AGM batteries, FM 80 and MX 60 Outback charge controllers, X-240 Outback transformer for 220v from inverter, 6500 watt Kubota diesel generator.
View user's profile
Skipjack Joe
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 7312
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Half Moon Bay
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-4-2013 at 09:22 AM


N 29 16'40.99 W 113 56'08.32

Marks a spot that connects the 2 level areas with the least amount of rock climbing. Follow the main canyon southwest until the side canyon and then turn east until you reach the marker. Then rough it south along that gully for maybe 2 miles to the side canyon going east and leading to the dry lake. The marker is the only difficult part and appears to be the least rugged gap from the canyons to the lake bed.

Enter those coordinates on google earth and it will zoom you to the proposed area.

Suerte

[Edited on 12-4-2013 by Skipjack Joe]
View user's profile
larryC
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1260
Registered: 8-11-2008
Location: BoLA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-5-2013 at 09:15 AM


Joe
I don't know if you have been out there but I have and that is some very rugged country. I won't say it can't be done but I will say that it can't be done the way I need to do it. On a quad or something like that. After looking at Google earth again and looking at the way Gardener went in, it looks like once he got onto the Botica dry lake he could have turned in a westerly direction and picked up a finger of salsipuedes and followed it into the canyon instead of going down the Botica wash and having to lower his Packjacks over the cliff. If only he would have Google earth to consult. Actually that is exactly what my friends did when they went in in 2010, they were able to ride up the canyon all the way to Botica dry lake, but still no one has found an easy way to get over the rocks and onto the dry lake that is accessible by truck from Bahia. If anyone wants to look some more from ground level let me know I'd like to join the expedition.
Larry
Larry
Larry




Off grid, 12-190watt evergreen solar panels on solar trackers, 2-2812 stacked Outback inverters, 6-2v enersys 125-33 2000 amp hour AGM batteries, FM 80 and MX 60 Outback charge controllers, X-240 Outback transformer for 220v from inverter, 6500 watt Kubota diesel generator.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53642
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-5-2013 at 03:04 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack Joe
N 29 16'40.99 W 113 56'08.32

Marks a spot that connects the 2 level areas with the least amount of rock climbing. Follow the main canyon southwest until the side canyon and then turn east until you reach the marker. Then rough it south along that gully for maybe 2 miles to the side canyon going east and leading to the dry lake. The marker is the only difficult part and appears to be the least rugged gap from the canyons to the lake bed.

Enter those coordinates on google earth and it will zoom you to the proposed area.

Suerte

[Edited on 12-4-2013 by Skipjack Joe]


Here is Igor's waypoint on GE... all three zooms are with north at the top, the closest view at an angle. It is west from the second dry lake (Laguna Seca):









"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Mark_BC
Nomad
**




Posts: 121
Registered: 12-1-2013
Location: Vancouver, BC
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-5-2013 at 03:45 PM


Yeah I looked into that route but it looks like there's a lot of scrub and likely cactus I'd have to pull my bike over. And I'd have to get way up the dry lakes too, whereas the other approach is from the highway. But it might be an option. We actually went up there last June to check it out and I took some pictures and video of the hills as seen from the road beside that steep sloped flat mesa before it turns east to go down to Condelero. Those hills look a lot more intimidating in person than in Google Earth! But the good part is that there is no cactus in the dry lake leading up to that traverse and would be very easy to ride across.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Skipjack Joe
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 7312
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Half Moon Bay
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-5-2013 at 04:28 PM


This was a suggestion of how to get from Salsipuedes canyon south to BOLA without walking the coast or going back to the highway.

I think you have the advantage of picking up your bike and carrying it over the rough stuff, something the quad people can't do.

There may be an issue of water as well. As I understand it you can make water from the sea but it has to be carried everywhere else. I figure it would take 3 days to go from the mouth of salsipuedes to guadalupe bay. 1st day to work your way up the canyon from the sea to it's source. 2nd day to cross the saddle to the dry lake. 3rd day to cross 2 dry lakes to the bay.

The side canyon leading to the marker has a couple of areas that are blocked with huge boulders. You may need ropes to haul your bikes up those things. You will probably have to walk your bikes leading up to the marker and have to carry them down that slope, but after that it's smooth sailing. Some of those lakes are as smooth as a billiard table, as you know.

Thanks for posting those images David. If you lower your view even further you get a good 3 dimensional view of the entire trail. In the last image the best way seemed to be straight down the picture, not the direction we are looking at to the right.

Wish I was going. Stay safe. Go light but go right. Bring a lot of Cliff Bars. :lol::lol::lol:
View user's profile
motoged
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 5246
Registered: 7-31-2006
Location: Kamloops, BC
Member Is Online

Mood: Gettin' Better

[*] posted on 12-5-2013 at 04:33 PM


Mark_BC,

When are you doing this ride?




Don't believe everything you think....
View user's profile
 Pages:  1  2    4  ..  24

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright � 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group�






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262