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Author: Subject: Hottest chili??
Santiago
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[*] posted on 12-29-2013 at 08:19 AM
Hottest chili??


Struggle to grow the world's hottest chili here.
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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 12-29-2013 at 08:47 AM


A few years ago we grew some Trinidad Scorpion chilis right in our own garden, and they ended up pretty darned hot. They made for an excellent hot sauce, with a rich fruity flavor that was frankly well worth surviving the heat. :fire:
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[*] posted on 12-29-2013 at 11:08 AM


Thanks .. very interesting

"Chilis are the male equivalent of cupcakes" ... :lol::lol:




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[*] posted on 12-29-2013 at 01:02 PM
chilis


That statement about being face f' ed by satan just breaks me up. Thanks for the best description of being lit up by mother natures warmest embrace. If that doesn't bring a smile and a laugh we are dead already.
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[*] posted on 12-29-2013 at 01:04 PM
Hotest ones calledCarolina Reapers and are grown in S. Carolina =


ABC News ‎- 3 days ago

The heat of a pepper is measured in Scoville Heat Units. Zero is bland, and a regular jalapeno pepper registers around 5,000 on the Scoville scale. Currie's world record batch of Carolina Reapers comes in at 1,569,300 Scoville Heat Units, with an individual pepper measured at 2.2 million. Pepper spray weighs in at about 2 million Scoville Units.




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[*] posted on 4-6-2014 at 05:10 AM


Just ran across this old thread.

I'm in the process of growing about 50 seeds of these Carolina Reaper hot chilis in a quasi hot house in my garage, ie light bulb, clear rap over growing containers. Then into the 1/2 wine barrels in the back yard. Once they are a few months old I'll keep about 5 of the healthiest and give the rest away to my enemies.

I put other hot chillis I have grown in the past (habaneros, scotch bonnets, jalapenos, etc. the bushes are still producing) in ball jars of vinegar to store them for up to a year. I use the vinegar and chopped up chilis in many recipes that call for vinegar or just to enhance a dish. Long cooking or BBQ smoking tones down the heat a bunch and leaves a wonder after taste to the dish.


http://store.puckerbuttpeppercompany.com/collections/stupit-...
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[*] posted on 4-6-2014 at 08:07 AM


One of my by best friends (Bill) is one of these hottest chili growing guys and he dries, grinds & packages the stuff. As a result I always have the hottest stuff on the planet at my dinner table. I have ruined many a dinner with this stuff and I like hot food! I'll try to remember to bring a batch down to BoLA on my next visit.

Bill gets his seeds from Jim Duffy (mentioned in the article) - Jim works at Solar Turbines as a machinist. I retired from Solar last year.

The chili competition is really funny to me but these guys are dead serious about it.

[Edited on 4-6-2014 by 55steve]
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[*] posted on 4-6-2014 at 08:25 AM
Did you know that crickets love chilli pepers?


I guess that, like birds, they don't taste the capsaicin. I kept hearing noise outside my door every night and finally went out with a flashlight to investigate. Lo and behold a chilli pepper Ristras that I bought in New Mexico and hung outside my door was completely covered with crickets that eventually ate all the dried chilli peppers including the seeds.



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[*] posted on 4-6-2014 at 08:52 AM


I'm frankly (and shirley) baffled by the move to make chili's hotter. I'm no fan of the main chemical, capsaicin but learned that vinegar trick many years ago. The real flavors that get hidden by the heat factor are truly the essence of why and what I want when I cook or prepare food with them. I was amazed when I finally got habaneros distilled out to where the flavor meant more than the Heat Units.
If it's the heat you're so attracted to, I've got some boiling oil that will fill the same space...and you won't need to repeat it.....

BTW, if anyone has tips to remove the heat and expose the underlying chili flavors, I'd like to hear them, I'm currently laid up for a few weeks and could work on some new tasty recipes...




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[*] posted on 4-6-2014 at 09:05 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by Sweetwater
BTW, if anyone has tips to remove the heat and expose the underlying chili flavors, I'd like to hear them, I'm currently laid up for a few weeks and could work on some new tasty recipes...


Here are my baby reaper's been growing in the window sill since feb. I have found that drying and turning into a powder takes away a lot of the extreme heat and brings out the natural smoky flavors of the pepper





[Edited on 4-6-2014 by blackwolfmt]

P1013558 (Large) (Small) (Custom).JPG - 32kB
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[*] posted on 4-6-2014 at 10:02 AM
This chart is a little out of date as there have been many more hot ones found.




peppers rev Nomad.jpg - 36kB
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 03:11 PM


I grow several varieties of chiles every year in my gardens. Pam and I make several varieties of hot sauce from them. Here is where I order my plants from... https://www.chileplants.com/
They have just about every variety and heat level you could possibly ask for.
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 03:52 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Sweetwater
I'm frankly (and shirley) baffled by the move to make chili's hotter. I'm no fan of the main chemical, capsaicin but learned that vinegar trick many years ago. The real flavors that get hidden by the heat factor are truly the essence of why and what I want when I cook or prepare food with them. I was amazed when I finally got habaneros distilled out to where the flavor meant more than the Heat Units.
If it's the heat you're so attracted to, I've got some boiling oil that will fill the same space...and you won't need to repeat it.....

BTW, if anyone has tips to remove the heat and expose the underlying chili flavors, I'd like to hear them, I'm currently laid up for a few weeks and could work on some new tasty recipes...



Sweetwater,

you should experiment adding some chinese prickly ash to your concoctions, it has a numbing affect which can hide the heat
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 03:56 PM


This was my last Hab harvest. I smoked all of them , then made a couple jars of hot sauce and ground the rest for powder which is one of my favs

P2111511 (Small) (2) (Custom).JPG - 33kB
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 03:58 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Pompano
I can't resist the hot stuff....or a good laugh. Found this display at a stop near the world's tallest thermometer at that wide place on I-15 driving towards Las Vegas from California. Baker or ?

Lots of wild hot sauces with funny labels. Can't vouch for how any tasted...just wanted the photo.




For a good quick appetizer or entre...I love marinated & grilled peppers.



Some of the sauces I've tried are a little too....mmm...HOT....like this one that's burning a hole in my stomach.





I can't see what you are pointing to on your tongue. But I see what that stuff did to your hair! Very scary!!
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 04:00 PM


I am just kidding Pampano. My philosophy is; any hair is good hair. (because I have very little) : (
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 04:10 PM
CHINESE PRICKLY ASH Overview Information


Quote:
Originally posted by KaceyJ
you should experiment adding some chinese prickly ash to your concoctions, it has a numbing affect which can hide the heat





www.webmd.com/.../ingredientmono-1121-CHINESE%20PRICKLY%2...‎

Chinese prickly ash is a plant. The bark and berry are used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse Chinese prickly ash with ash, or northern or southern prickly ash.

People take Chinese prickly ash to treat vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, water retention, parasites, snakebite, and skin diseases. They also use it as a painkiller, stimulant, and tonic.

In foods, Chinese prickly ash is used as a spice.

How does it work?

It is not known how Chinese prickly ash might work.

CHINESE PRICKLY ASH Side Effects & Safety

There isnít enough information to know if Chinese prickly ash is safe for use as a medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of Chinese prickly ash during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Chinese prickly ash might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using Chinese prickly ash at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

CHINESE PRICKLY ASH Interactions

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with CHINESE PRICKLY ASH

Chinese prickly ash might slow blood clotting. Taking Chinese prickly ash along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.
Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.




[Edited on 4-7-2014 by durrelllrobert]




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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 07:30 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by durrelllrobert
Quote:
Originally posted by KaceyJ
you should experiment adding some chinese prickly ash to your concoctions, it has a numbing affect which can hide the heat





www.webmd.com/.../ingredientmono-1121-CHINESE%20PRICKLY%2...‎

Chinese prickly ash is a plant. The bark and berry are used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse Chinese prickly ash with ash, or northern or southern prickly ash.

People take Chinese prickly ash to treat vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, water retention, parasites, snakebite, and skin diseases. They also use it as a painkiller, stimulant, and tonic.

In foods, Chinese prickly ash is used as a spice.

How does it work?

It is not known how Chinese prickly ash might work.

CHINESE PRICKLY ASH Side Effects & Safety

There isnít enough information to know if Chinese prickly ash is safe for use as a medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of Chinese prickly ash during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Chinese prickly ash might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using Chinese prickly ash at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

CHINESE PRICKLY ASH Interactions

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with CHINESE PRICKLY ASH

Chinese prickly ash might slow blood clotting. Taking Chinese prickly ash along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.
Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.




[Edited on 4-7-2014 by durrelllrobert]




Well , if you're on all those meds I wouldn't ever eat Chinese food again

Also called Shezuan peppercor n , lately I find it labled as prickly ash--not sure why --but it is an unusual experience in food
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Sweetwater
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[*] posted on 4-7-2014 at 10:03 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by blackwolfmt
This was my last Hab harvest. I smoked all of them , then made a couple jars of hot sauce and ground the rest for powder which is one of my favs


I've been cheating the heating by making pepper jellies....just enough dilution and heat offset by sweetness and the flavor of the pepper which is my goal. My last batch of habaneros jelly was a nice orange tint with some heat and full flavor.......mmmmmmmm




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Reality is what does not go away when you stop believing in it. -Philip K Dick
Nothing is worse than active ignorance. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe(1749-1832, German writer, artist and politician)
When choosing between two evils, I always like to try the one I\'ve never tried before. - Mae West
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[*] posted on 4-8-2014 at 02:14 PM


an amiga nomad here has/had a chili mfg and internet store, i bought several of hers. Wish i could recall her handle. All were good.

we make our own now using blends but usually seranos as the predominate plus carrots in the mash. you have to clean the stems by hand then cook the mash in vinegar and water mix. Then blend followed by straining the juice/sauce with a chinoise and pestle, wooden - i had to buy mine at a cooking supply store like restoration hardware but it is the only way for me.




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