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Author: Subject: What are you reading?
DianaT
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[*] posted on 8-9-2014 at 08:23 AM


I recently finished a great book that has some very unique ideas about aging.

Dancing Fish and Ammonites: A Memoir by Penelope Lively


Quote:
Originally posted by soulpatch
Photovoltaic Systems by Jim Dunlop

A little "light" reading!:light:


But now I need to start a new book, and this one sounds fasicating! Is there a good plot? Is is a thriller? :lol::lol::lol:

Study study and study. :biggrin:

[Edited on 8-9-2014 by DianaT]
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BajaBlanca
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[*] posted on 8-9-2014 at 11:25 AM


:lol:





LOL soulpatch!

[Edited on 8-10-2014 by BajaBlanca]





Come visit La Bocana


https://sites.google.com/view/bajabocanahotel/home

And always remember, life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by those moments that take our breath away.
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DavidT
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[*] posted on 8-9-2014 at 11:29 AM


Weirdos from another Planet!
A Calvin and Hobbes collection by Bill Watterson




David
Not one shred of evidence supports the notion that life is serious.
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CaboDreamer
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[*] posted on 8-9-2014 at 09:37 PM


FRAGMENTS OF THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION

Personal Accounts From The Border

Oscar J. Martinez


A collection of first-hand accounts of mostly border region occurrences. Though I would like to take unlicensed privilege to recount one of the stories that relates to Baja here:


"Huertistas would run their horses through the orchards."
-Juseta Sumaya (1901- )

Born in Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, Juseta Sumaya comments on the disturbances that drove her family to San Diego and on the impossibility of returning to the life she had left behind.

My grandfather and all of his sons had their own ranches and other businesses all around. My father was on the side of Madero. Hundreds of Huertistas would come to our ranch and run their horses through the orchards, destroying the fruit and other things we had planted. They were dressed very badly, only the chiefs wore uniforms. One day the soldiers came from Cabo San Lucas and killed chickens, turkeys, and other animals that my grandfather had. They cooked underneath the trees. The soldiers stayed one day.
We had a friend who had a large ranch named La Laguna. The soldiers arrived one night and burned his house, just because he supported Madero. All the families slept in the fields because they were scared of Huerta's soldiers. They would take away the girls and abuse them.

We left Baja California by boat to San Diego in 1917, where we rented a house. In 1918 it was terrible during the Spanish flu (swine flu epidemic). Our whole family got it. We would wear a mask on the street, and at work we would spray ourselves with a disinfectant. Everyone wore masks. A godchild of my father's died. He worked in the fields and during weekends he would come home. One day he came home very sick and he was sent to the hospital. The authorities would check the homes, because many did not want to go the hospital. Many who went to the hospital died there. It may have been because the doctors were not familiar with the disease. My mother would cure the sick ones at home with remedies she knew about, with herbs and pills. The symptoms were headache and a very high fever. My mother would hide us so the health authorities would not find out, because those who went to the hospital would not return.

We went back to Baja California in 1919. My father had left our home, our cattle, everything, in the custody of a nephew. When we got there our home was in ruins; there were no animals. The nephew had sold them; he did not care. I returned to San Diego in 1923.
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Mulegena
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[*] posted on 8-9-2014 at 10:17 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by vgabndo
"The Miracle of Mindfulness", by the Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh... extols the value of being mindful down to each breath. I've especially enjoyed practicing his techniques of walking meditation as I walk the beach. Counting steps per breath and rhythmic pacing can empty the mind and melt away the miles...


Quote:
Originally posted by BajaBlanca
vgabndo - that is a really different book you are reading. My mom and her brother just discovered that they both pray as she takes her walks and he takes his jog. My mind is so busy as I walk that I find time flies but I will try the counting steps as I take a breath. That is a great idea...


I'm been a meditator since my 20s in the college years of Berkeley. Mindfulness, being aware and present in each moment is a tremendous practice to still the mind, and it's not easy.

Back then I was doing just this, meditating while going about my day. On a busy city street I walked, went into a restaurant, got some nice hot tea, and still focused, savored the pungent scent wafting up from the warm cup cradled in my hands. My reverie was interupted by a nice lady who said she's been watching me, assumed I was a street person and asked to buy me breakfast! I smiled, and thanked her for her generous offer. "Oh, I'm fine, thanks-- just meditating."

Nowadays, I meditate while scuba diving or snorkeling.
Always come out of the Sea of Cortez renewed.
Perhaps it's easier here in the slow pace of Baja. I dunno.

Reading? Trying to brush up on Mexican history, just the highlights. Could use Clif Notes.
Edited to add: CaboDreamer, that's an intriguing and personal glimpse into the history of the península. Had no idea. Thanks.

[Edited on 8-10-2014 by Mulegena]

[Edited on 8-10-2014 by Mulegena]




"Raise your words, not your voice. It's rain that grows flowers, not thunder." ~Rumi

"It's the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~ Aristotle
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BajaBlanca
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[*] posted on 8-10-2014 at 10:41 AM


CabpDreamer -I loved reading that! who knew!




Come visit La Bocana


https://sites.google.com/view/bajabocanahotel/home

And always remember, life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by those moments that take our breath away.
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DENNIS
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[*] posted on 8-10-2014 at 11:37 AM


"Bathroom Meditation" has answered more question and solved more problems than all other methods combined. [that occurred to me in a recent recycling session]



.

[Edited on 8-10-2014 by DENNIS]




"YOU CAN'T LITTER ALUMINUM"
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DENNIS
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[*] posted on 8-10-2014 at 11:42 AM


Quote:
Originally posted by CaboDreamer
FRAGMENTS OF THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION

Personal Accounts From The Border

Oscar J. Martinez




At first I flashed on Oscar's namesake authority, Pablo Martinez, who authored the definitive, "History Of Baja California."




"YOU CAN'T LITTER ALUMINUM"
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vgabndo
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Mood: Checking-off my bucket list.

[*] posted on 8-10-2014 at 01:21 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by Mulegena
Quote:
Originally posted by vgabndo
"The Miracle of Mindfulness", by the Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh... extols the value of being mindful down to each breath. I've especially enjoyed practicing his techniques of walking meditation as I walk the beach. Counting steps per breath and rhythmic pacing can empty the mind and melt away the miles...


Quote:
Originally posted by BajaBlanca
vgabndo - that is a really different book you are reading. My mom and her brother just discovered that they both pray as she takes her walks and he takes his jog. My mind is so busy as I walk that I find time flies but I will try the counting steps as I take a breath. That is a great idea...


I'm been a meditator since my 20s in the college years of Berkeley. Mindfulness, being aware and present in each moment is a tremendous practice to still the mind, and it's not easy.

Back then I was doing just this, meditating while going about my day. On a busy city street I walked, went into a restaurant, got some nice hot tea, and still focused, savored the pungent scent wafting up from the warm cup cradled in my hands. My reverie was interupted by a nice lady who said she's been watching me, assumed I was a street person and asked to buy me breakfast! I smiled, and thanked her for her generous offer. "Oh, I'm fine, thanks-- just meditating."

Nowadays, I meditate while scuba diving or snorkeling.
Always come out of the Sea of Cortez renewed.
Perhaps it's easier here in the slow pace of Baja. I dunno.

Reading? Trying to brush up on Mexican history, just the highlights. Could use Clif Notes.
Edited to add: CaboDreamer, that's an intriguing and personal glimpse into the history of the península. Had no idea. Thanks.

[Edited on 8-10-2014 by Mulegena]

[Edited on 8-10-2014 by Mulegena]


I've read a lot of Thich Nhat Hanh. I studied his book "Anger" as my relationship deteriorated. His techniques for defusing anger between loved ones comforted me. My brother in law and his wife meditate regularly, and when their daughter became of an age when she might join them, and allow them to all sit together, this was strongly encouraged. My BIL relates that during an early session he c-cked an eye her way to find her 'eyes squinted, face slightly red, and straining for the mysterious result she expected'.

I find it much easier to meditate here. Thay teaches that doing the dishes with mindfulness needn't be a chore, it can be a meditation.




Undoubtedly, there are people who cannot afford to give the anchor of sanity even the slightest tug. Sam Harris

"The situation is far too dire for pessimism."
Bill Kauth

Carl Sagan said, "We are a way for the cosmos to know itself."

PEACE, LOVE AND FISH TACOS
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Marc
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[*] posted on 8-10-2014 at 07:56 PM


"Crazy River" by Richard Grant. The guy who wrote "God's Middle Finger."
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Cypress
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[*] posted on 8-11-2014 at 08:40 AM


"Berlin Dance Of Death" by Helmut Altner.
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tripledigitken
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[*] posted on 8-11-2014 at 09:29 AM


Baja Nomad- by y'all
;)
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Martyman
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[*] posted on 8-11-2014 at 01:33 PM


Life by Richard Fortey. A natural history of the past 4 billion years. A little slow but fascinating.
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BajaLuna
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[*] posted on 8-12-2014 at 10:12 AM


I'm reading "seven thousand ways to listen" by Mark Nepo.

Vgabndo, I love Thich Nhat Hanh's books too, what an inspiration he is!




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