BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: San Ignacio question
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1052
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 08:34 AM
San Ignacio question


I remember seeing images here of a Jesuit built dam somewhere around San Ignacio.
Does anyone have an exact location for me?




Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 10:25 AM


It was called the "Muralla". Harry Crosby showed photos of it in the 1960's.

Here is a paragraph from my new book about it:

Flash floods were frequently responsible for agricultural losses, so the Jesuits had massive dikes built. The largest was called a muralla and was three miles long, twelve feet high, and up to forty feet wide. Protective dikes had been destroyed twice before this final one was completed, in 1762. Remains of the muralla are located just east of the mission and town center of San Ignacio.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 11:20 AM




This photo is from the 1974 book, 'The King's Highway in Baja California' by Harry Crosby. Highway construction to San Ignacio was in late 1972.

Based on the background (Highway 1 cut, and Tres Virgenes volcano), my guess for this location is: 27º17.52', -112º52.58'

It sure would be fun to get a new photo from that same spot or see more of the mission dikes, if they haven't all been destroyed!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1052
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 11:57 AM


I think, I found it.

9 miles out of town. About half way between San Ignacio and Tres Virgines.
I'll check it out in a couple of days




Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Bajahowodd
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 9274
Registered: 12-15-2008
Location: Disneyland Adjacent and anywhere in Baja
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 05:22 PM


A giant dike, or dyke? :?::?::P
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 06:53 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Bajahowodd  
A giant dike, or dyke? :?::?::P


I spelled the same as Harry did in his book. A quick Internet search turns up this:

Dike vs. dyke
In American and Canadian English, dike is the preferred spelling of the noun referring to (1) an embankment used to prevent floods, and (2) a low wall dividing lands. Dyke is the preferred spelling in all other main varieties of English.

Dyke is also a derogatory slang word referring to a lesbian. While this sense of dyke has been reappropriated and made positive by some, it is still generally considered offensive and should be shunned outside very specific contexts.

Examples

American and Canadian publications use dike for a flood-preventing embankment—




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
woody with a view
PITA Nomad
********




Posts: 15370
Registered: 11-8-2004
Location: Looking at the Coronado Islands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Everchangin'

[*] posted on 12-23-2015 at 07:00 PM


I wonder how much they paid the workers for each rock deposited? Three miles long, 12 feet high and 40 feet thick equals enough rocks to for someone to retire a rich man!!!




View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 12-24-2015 at 10:35 AM


Quote: Originally posted by woody with a view  
I wonder how much they paid the workers for each rock deposited? Three miles long, 12 feet high and 40 feet thick equals enough rocks to for someone to retire a rich man!!!


Paid? Workers? Funny!

The padre who commissioned the work (José Rotea) was in charge at San Ignacio from 1759 to 1768. The mission was founded in 1728, so the Indians were 2nd or 3rd generation neophyte Christians and probably knew little of their ancestors pre-mission life not working for the church, king, God.

It was a mission-community action to prevent floods from destroying their fields where food was grown. The same is true of the hundreds of miles of roads built in the 1700s called El Camino Real, particularly the switchbacks down mountainsides.

It may not have been "politically correct" in today's world, but that is how such things in (Baja) California were built 250 years ago.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 3-24-2017 at 06:49 PM


Last month, I visited the Muralla... an easy to reach piece of it, just east of the San Ignacio entrance...







It is amazing!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 10751
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 3-24-2017 at 07:33 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by woody with a view  
I wonder how much they paid the workers for each rock deposited? Three miles long, 12 feet high and 40 feet thick equals enough rocks to for someone to retire a rich man!!!


Paid? Workers? Funny!

The padre who commissioned the work (Jos� Rotea) was in charge at San Ignacio from 1759 to 1768. The mission was founded in 1728, so the Indians were 2nd or 3rd generation neophyte Christians and probably knew little of their ancestors pre-mission life not working for the church, king, God.

It was a mission-community action to prevent floods from destroying their fields where food was grown. The same is true of the hundreds of miles of roads built in the 1700s called El Camino Real, particularly the switchbacks down mountainsides.

It may not have been "politically correct" in today's world, but that is how such things in (Baja) California were built 250 years ago.


So it was either a communal effort (sort of commie or socialist) or slave effort. Which?
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 3-24-2017 at 09:36 PM


It was for the preservation of the farmlands which everyone depended on for food. The Jesuits did not enslave or make prisoners of the natives. That came later when the Spanish government took over from the Jesuits in 1768.



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
BajaBlanca
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 9869
Registered: 10-28-2008
Location: La Bocana, BCS
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 3-26-2017 at 08:29 AM


What an incredible wall! Thanks for the history lesson.



Blanca and Les
Come visit us

http://www.labocanahotel.com
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 51285
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 3-26-2017 at 10:59 AM


Quote: Originally posted by BajaBlanca  
What an incredible wall! Thanks for the history lesson.


Next time you are in San Ignacio, just drive past the entrance road (whalebone display) and in a few hundred meters is a large dirt lot, on the right... just before the Baja Oasis Motel. Turn into that lot and park towards the back of it. The Muralla is there!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage

  Go To Top


For high speed satellite internet in Baja call +1.6197170810 - or click here to email sistemassatelitales@hotmail.com



Tijuana Walking Tours - on Meetup.com


 






All Content Copyright © 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group 






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

 

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

 

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

 

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262