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Santiago
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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 07:45 AM
"Finca"


I've seen this word in front of another name for a bodega or café, what does it mean?
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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 08:00 AM


I've seen it translated as "estate". I had some Colombian coffee recently called "Finca del Valle", which means "Estate of the Valley". Naturally there are probably variations and colloquialisms from region to region.



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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 08:04 AM


I lived in Costa Rica 45 years ago and it was used to denote a farm there , anything over 10 acres or so .
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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 08:09 AM


I agree with the previous posters. I chuckle a little every time I see the word, because in Swedish "finka" (pronounced the same) means "prison" or "jail."
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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 09:26 AM


may I add a tip here?

Just recently they invented Google.
www.google.com
It's like a dictionary in all kind of languages.
And you can look up how cars work.
and of course, you can look up finca
https://www.google.com.mx/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&...

No good explanation yet on how women function though.

[Edited on 5-21-2016 by 4x4abc]




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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 09:52 AM


Here is what my translator shows.

finca

FEMININE NOUN1. (real estate)
a. property
Tengo un par de fincas en venta en un pueblo a diez kilómetros de aquí.I have a couple of properties for sale in a town ten kilometers away from here.

b. country house
Todos los fines de semana mis suegros se van a su finca en el norte de la región.Every weekend my in-laws go to their country house in the north.

c. country estate
Nuestro vecino nos invitó a su finca a montar a caballo.Our neighbor invited us to his country estate to go riding.

d. ranch (United States)
La finca tiene una vista espectacular a las montañas.The ranch has a spectacular view of the mountains.
e. farm

Me he comprado una finca en el campo para irme allí a vivir cuando me jubile.I have bought a farm in the countryside to move to when I retire.

2. (urban apartment block) (Spain)
a. building
Se vende piso en finca clásica con bonita fachada y balcones.Apartment for sale in a classic-style building with an attractive facade and balconies.


finca

1 (bien inmueble) property; land; real estate
cazar en finca ajena to poach on sb else's property; (on sb else's property)
penetrar en finca ajena to trespass on sb else's property; (on sb else's property)
finca raíz (And) real estate
finca urbana town property

2 (casa de recreo) country house; country estate
pasan un mes en su finca they're spending a month at their country place;
tienen una finca en Guadalajara they have a country house o country estate in Guadalajara

3 (granja) farm; (minifundio) small holding; [de ganado] ranch
finca azucarera sugar plantation
finca cafetera coffee plantation

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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 03:50 PM


My wife (Colombian) always refers to farms as a finca.



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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 05:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Ken Cooke  
My wife (Colombian) always refers to farms as a finca.


So, the popular phrase in Colombia is "Donde esta la finca de cocaina?" :lol:;)




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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 06:37 PM


Don't know anything about Google but Bing has this info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finca
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[*] posted on 5-21-2016 at 07:56 PM


The use of the word "finca" depends on which country in Latin America one is talking about. In Mexico it's only common in the southern part. For example, a coffee plantation is always called a finca in Chiapas. In the north the word "rancho" is usually used for any kind of agricultural operation. Sometimes the word "granja" is used in the English sense of farm.

In Costa Rica the word finca is always used for an agricultural operation. In Argentina a "rancho" is a rustic rural shack, a "pago" is a small ranch or farm, and "estancia" a big one. Be careful with the use of the word "estancia" in Mexico because it most often means "stay" in the sense of longer term presence in a location.

I've found that using the word rancho for an ag operation all over Latin America is understood. For me it's the word that slips out when I'm in conversation. It doesn't mean that the person I'm talking with won't come back with "finca" or "granja," depending where I am. I've never seen it used in front of "bodega" or "cafe." It's possible the business is connected with an ag operation or there's a special local meaning.
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Santiago
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[*] posted on 5-22-2016 at 06:07 AM


Quote: Originally posted by gsbotanico  
I've never seen it used in front of "bodega" or "cafe." It's possible the business is connected with an ag operation or there's a special local meaning.


http://fincaltozano.com/ Finca Altozano, We are going to have our anniversary dinner there next weekend. Possibly a "farm-to-fork" play on words?

[Edited on 5-22-2016 by Santiago]
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[*] posted on 5-22-2016 at 07:49 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Santiago  
Quote: Originally posted by gsbotanico  
I've never seen it used in front of "bodega" or "cafe." It's possible the business is connected with an ag operation or there's a special local meaning.


http://fincaltozano.com/ Finca Altozano, We are going to have our anniversary dinner there next weekend. Possibly a "farm-to-fork" play on words?

[Edited on 5-22-2016 by Santiago]


The website says, "En Finca Altozano, utilizamos únicamente productos e ingredientes de la región, de los huertos, mares y ranchos más cercanos." So they are attaching themselves to food production operations. Notice that they use the word "rancho." I would translate the sentence as, "At Finca Altozano, we only use products and ingredients from the region, from the orchards, sea, and nearby farms (ranches)." Definitely "farm-to-fork," although the seafood may or may not be farmed. There is aquaculture in the Ensenada ocean area.

I usually hear the restaurant referred to simply as Altozano. The use of "finca" may be used to give a more exclusive, high-end vibe. I consulted with an ag operation in Guadalupe Valley for some years, and every pure agricultural farm was called "rancho." The best cheese place in the valley is called Rancho Cortés.

I haven't eaten at Altozano, but it looks to be an excellent choice. Let us know how everything turns out. Often these kinds of places have small vegetable and herb gardens attached.
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[*] posted on 5-22-2016 at 08:15 AM


Nayarit must be where the line blurs because, on occassion, I would hear finca as a farm.
I would definitely hear it from Central and South Americans as farm.
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