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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 08:29 AM
soccer word


My Spanish is fairly basic, so in addition to podcasts and other learning material, I'm combining my love of the Beautiful Game with a desire to speak the language by watching Spanish and Mexican football on television. The problem, of course, is that sports announcers speak much too rapidly for me, especially when excited, but I'm at a point where I'm recognizing more each time I make the effort.

Like any sport, there is a rich vocabulary of slang that defies easy translation. One such word - which I'm writing phonetically and very well may have botched - is "cambiesaso". In the context it seems to be a pass, or a cross, in which case I would expect to hear "pase" or "cruz". Can anyone identify this mystery word?




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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 01:24 PM


Quote: Originally posted by pauldavidmena  
My Spanish is fairly basic, so in addition to podcasts and other learning material, I'm combining my love of the Beautiful Game with a desire to speak the language by watching Spanish and Mexican football on television. The problem, of course, is that sports announcers speak much too rapidly for me, especially when excited, but I'm at a point where I'm recognizing more each time I make the effort.

Like any sport, there is a rich vocabulary of slang that defies easy translation. One such word - which I'm writing phonetically and very well may have botched - is "cambiesaso". In the context it seems to be a pass, or a cross, in which case I would expect to hear "pase" or "cruz". Can anyone identify this mystery word?

I'll take a guess. Is it "cambiazo?" This word comes from"cambiar" (to change) and "azo" (an ending that make the word bigger, more exaggerated, or more sudden.) This word could be translated as "switcheroo," which would make sense in context. Another translation might be "feint." As I said, just a guess. These "azo" words are often invented for a particular situation like in sports.
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Nashville Frank
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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 06:12 PM


Hey fellow socceristas! I too, share a love for this great game. And although I'm considered fluent by my Spanish-speaking friends, it's so hard to understand their sports broadcasters! Recently, I spent two weeks with friends in El Rosario and almost every day we watched games. It really helped my soccer Spanish.

When I saw you post, the first thing I thought of was the word "cabezazo" (from the word for head "cabeza"). Which can be a "head butt" or a "header". Your context would dictate a header, because a head butt would get a card from a referee!

Hope this helps,
Frank


[Edited on 3-13-2017 by Nashville Frank]
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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 07:56 PM


Thank you for the responses! I now remember that the "azo" suffix is a modifier to emphasize a particular action or event. "Gasolinazo" is a recent example. I was watching soccer tonight, and I still believe what I heard was "cambiesazo". The context was a centering pass - specifically a cross against the flow of play.



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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 08:45 PM


I've been wrong plenty but when I am watching here I think it means to change sides.... like if they are bringing the ball up the right side to kick it over to the left side.

I often hear it and say it as cambio el lado.

It is quite possible I have no idea what I am talking about, though.... it is a whole 'nother lexicon on the cancha.

[Edited on 3-13-2017 by soulpatch]
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[*] posted on 3-12-2017 at 08:58 PM


Quote:
Quote: Originally posted by pauldavidmena  
"cambiesazo".- specifically a cross against the flow of play.


Google translates "cambiesaz" as meaning to "change your mind"





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[*] posted on 3-13-2017 at 10:20 AM


Yeah, I think they are talking about passing the ball across the field of play to switch the ball up to open space. Cambiar is the root verb, sounds like it's being used with some flair on the end (azo), so the announcer probably thinks it's a really good pass.
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[*] posted on 3-13-2017 at 10:36 AM


Like goal azo!
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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 3-13-2017 at 10:48 AM


It all makes sense now. Gracias!



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[*] posted on 3-14-2017 at 02:57 PM


I don't get anything when using Google Translate or Googling in Spanish with "cambiesaz" or "cambiesazo." The online Spanish slang dictionaries don't seem to help much either.

Any native Mexican Spanish speakers here who can give a definitive answer?
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Nashville Frank
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[*] posted on 3-14-2017 at 10:12 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Argentino  
Yeah, I think they are talking about passing the ball across the field of play to switch the ball up to open space. Cambiar is the root verb, sounds like it's being used with some flair on the end (azo), so the announcer probably thinks it's a really good pass.


Das ist richtig! That's right. Thank you Argentino! The word he's hearing is cambiazo. It's a switching the field of attack pass.

In baseball they use the word for a "change-up" pitch.
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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 3-15-2017 at 03:50 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Nashville Frank  
Quote: Originally posted by Argentino  
Yeah, I think they are talking about passing the ball across the field of play to switch the ball up to open space. Cambiar is the root verb, sounds like it's being used with some flair on the end (azo), so the announcer probably thinks it's a really good pass.


Das ist richtig! That's right. Thank you Argentino! The word he's hearing is cambiazo. It's a switching the field of attack pass.

In baseball they use the word for a "change-up" pitch.


Great analogy with the change-up pitch. My idol, Pedro Martinez had one so devastating it might have been called "cambiazo-azo-azo".




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[*] posted on 3-15-2017 at 09:28 AM


Quote: Originally posted by gsbotanico  
I don't get anything when using Google Translate or Googling in Spanish with "cambiesaz" or "cambiesazo." The online Spanish slang dictionaries don't seem to help much either.

Any native Mexican Spanish speakers here who can give a definitive answer?


I got that result using the google translate app on my phone. Selected "Detect language" then paused after each letter.
The first result was on cambi, Italian for change; cambie, cambies,and cambiesa are Spanish for Change; and cambiesaz, Spanish for change your mind.

I've still no idea if any of those googles are correct though.




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[*] posted on 3-15-2017 at 02:43 PM


Quote: Originally posted by DavidT  
I got that result using the google translate app on my phone. Selected "Detect language" then paused after each letter.
The first result was on cambi, Italian for change; cambie, cambies,and cambiesa are Spanish for Change; and cambiesaz, Spanish for change your mind.

I've still no idea if any of those googles are correct though.

Well, I used a desktop computer at home. This may account for the difference. I suspect the word may have been invented by the announcer. We get this kind of thing with English sports broadcasters.

I'm going to ask around in Mexico to see if I can find a local soccer fan who has heard the word. I don't watch or listen to Spanish language soccer, but I do hear other kinds of shows, and some words can be very hard to understand.
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[*] posted on 3-15-2017 at 02:57 PM


I just bought a samsung TV here and the remote has a "futbol" button that when you press it max's out the contrast and goes full volume with a crowd cheering sound! im told in canada the remotes have a similar "hockey" button
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[*] posted on 3-15-2017 at 03:05 PM


I'm not a big soccer fan, so I may be somewhat off. But, having had to endure endless hours of soccer on TV growing up in Europe, I think I have somewhat of an understanding of the game. If this really is a soccer term and I were to venture an uneducated guess, I would speculate that it means something like "excruciatingly boring" or maybe "that player is a flopping actress," or perhaps "spectator violence," or possibly "worse than baseball"?

Close? ;)
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 02:55 AM


Man the best way to learn Spanish is to marry a Spanish speaking fan of soccer, as my friend did:biggrin:.
He went to Spain to teach English and to learn Spanish, was kind of fun + work, he met a girl at his class, she liked soccer and going out. Between watching games in pubs and English lessons they realized they were a match, got married, made a family business… The friend speaks great Spanish now (as he thinks:)) seriously he succeeded in the language within 3 years. They have a restaurant in the touristic area, also going to buy some property in Barcelona https://tranio.com/spain/catalonia/barcelona/ and make a hotel. Looks like his life improved a lot after his intention to learn Spanish:yes:.
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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 03:31 PM


For me the best way to learn Spanish is to insert myself into a Spanish-speaking country and to resist the urge to default to English, even when the the person I'm speaking with is willing to accommodate me. In Mexico, I've found that everyone seems more than willing to be patient with me as I struggle with the language, even gently correcting my pronunciation or grammar.



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[*] posted on 4-24-2017 at 09:14 AM


I think I've figured out the mystery word, thanks to a weekly vocabulary list I get from "Transparent Language". This week's list was Spanish football terms, and one word that stood out was "cabezazo", meaning "header". How I got "cambiezazo" out of that, I'll never know...



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[*] posted on 4-25-2017 at 08:48 AM


Quote: Originally posted by pauldavidmena  
I think I've figured out the mystery word, thanks to a weekly vocabulary list I get from "Transparent Language". This week's list was Spanish football terms, and one word that stood out was "cabezazo", meaning "header". How I got "cambiezazo" out of that, I'll never know...

Yep. Makes perfect sense. I asked around in Baja about "cambiezazo," and all I got was puzzled looks and no answers.
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