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Author: Subject: When not to retire to Baja?
soulpatch
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[*] posted on 3-25-2017 at 08:46 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Kgryfon  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Choose a career doing something you enjoy so you dont waste your working life "waiting" for retirement.


Yes, that's a nice idea. Not usually an option for most people. Instead, we settle for what pays the bills and keeps the kids with food in their mouths and a roof over their heads. And then we live for retirement.


Nice to see this veer onto a philosophical course.

It is an option for everybody, in my opinion.

It takes courage and faith in your vision, though, and often the bucking of a system, family, societal pressure and your own fear of stepping off the edge can take a toll.

Kind of like moving to Mexico.... it ain't for everybody and I recall, often, a certain fellow here stating my family wouldn't make it and we'd be back in the USA in less than a year and a half after we failed.

And, of course, all the other people over the course of a lifetime telling me "you just can't go do what you want", "you have be responsible", "you're going to fail", the list goes on and I am certain we have all heard these things before.

That is the problem when people don't take the responsibility of shaping their own paradigm of success.

I have failed mightily, to the point of briefly calling the back of my truck home, to having an apartment with a box as my coffee table and a lawn chair for my sofa but that is how it goes in this game of life.

And, I have also chosen my own path since I started paying rent at the age of 15.
It hasn't been easy and I worked with the tools I possess and possessed.
But, it has all been doing what I wanted with some dues paying along the way and a long range vision and faith in what I know makes me happy.

For me it breaks down to the following, shape your own path or have somebody shape it for you.

Of course, all that is quite possible having been born in the USA or other privileged countries, you just have to decide where your comfort zone is.

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pauldavidmena
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[*] posted on 3-25-2017 at 11:43 AM


Quote: Originally posted by soulpatch  

For me it breaks down to the following, shape your own path or have somebody shape it for you.

Of course, all that is quite possible having been born in the USA or other privileged countries, you just have to decide where your comfort zone is.


It's definitely a first-world problem to have to decide whether or not to retire at a certain age. My maternal grandfather didn't have that option, dying at age 46. My father, on the other hand, retired at 59, but now that he is taking care of my ailing mother at 84, I'm betting he wished he retired even sooner.

For me it's not so much that I hate my job, but rather that it's not nearly as easy for me to do it as it was when I started out 34 years ago. High tech is a young man's world, and I'm no longer a young man. I am, on the other hand, still young enough to have my health and the ability to enjoy life. That, for me, is the tipping point - leaving before I'm no longer capable of experiencing joy and adventure.




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soulpatch
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[*] posted on 3-25-2017 at 01:46 PM


Your last sentence captures it for me.

I enjoyed my work, I was good at it and it allowed me to serve people, which I like.

However, I was also ready to leave the minute I could to have at least a few more chapters in life.

It truly is a problem for only those of us privileged enough to have been born into a time and space that allows for that.

I am sure those Guatemalans and Nicaraguans I've seen on La Bestia don't think too much about that.

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[*] posted on 3-25-2017 at 03:00 PM


When to retire?
My 2¢ ~ When you have completed your new home here.
I can get by with $1000 fairly easily for the basics. Home improvements really add up and so does the Amazon cart. Beer and wine are included in moderation. Oh, I'm including my addiction to cigarettes and that is equal to food costs now. :(
You will want a big garage for boat, quad, camper and truck :biggrin:
Good Luck!




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[*] posted on 3-26-2017 at 01:37 PM


SoulPatch wrote: "And, of course, all the other people over the course of a lifetime telling me "you just can't go do what you want", "you have be responsible", "you're going to fail", the list goes on and I am certain we have all heard these things before."

I joined the Peace Corps and went to Africa in 1989 and have not yet returned to live in the USA. I had a roommate at the time ('89) who told me it was the stupidest thing ever. But really it was the best decision of my life, with the last 27 years in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Mexico. It was a great ride. Not a lot of money, but I have truly seen the world and much better than tourists, have lived around the world and experienced many cultures at work and in the neighborhood. Not a traditional life and no, it's not for everyone, but it quite suited me. And my patient, curious and loving wife.

You CAN do it if you want to. The decision to do it is the hard part. So many excuses. So many reasons not to do it. All valid. All real.

[Edited on 3-26-2017 by TedZark]
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soulpatch
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[*] posted on 3-26-2017 at 02:12 PM


That is pretty cool, TedZark.

Summed up quite nicely with that ending paragraph.
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[*] posted on 3-27-2017 at 10:57 AM


Just a little story about another point of view to ponder also.
A 50 yr employee I worked with at a refinery in Oklahoma said to me sternly after asking him about retirement.
"I have read the Bible many times over, nowhere in there is the word retire mentioned anywhere"





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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 3-27-2017 at 12:16 PM


What, you don't consider being crucified, dying, coming back to life, and then accending to heaven retiring...



"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 3-27-2017 at 12:47 PM


Since, I withdrew my VLO, about 200 people have recieved involuntary layoffs.
So, if this goes according to my plan I should get a layoff notice some time next year... hopefully about 6 months after my 59th birthday. At 59.5 you can start taking 401k money without tax penalty.
We get 26 weeks pay plus 1 year unemployment pay on layoff.
And I keep my recall rights.
So ideally I would be recalled after a year's mini-retirement. Maybe a few years.
1 or 2 years should be enough to build my 1st small structure.
If I had accepted the Voluntarily layoff I would have needed to give up my recall rights.
So a 1-3 year mini-retirment would nice. And then I still have the option to return if recalled in case I need more money. Which I probably will.




"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

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BajaTed
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[*] posted on 3-27-2017 at 01:54 PM


Do you have to keep paying monthly union dues for the recall rights?:?:

That NO tax penalty is only if you designated your 401k as after tax when you first set it up.

A medical clearance for rehire is required contractually with most recalls also. :o

(Past IBEW shop steward just making sure you got it right,
Here is my other advice)
"if you were sleeping and got caught, say Amen when you wake up or I don't have a chance"





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