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Author: Subject: Not one American stopped to help. Not one.
unbob
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 08:36 AM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Once the highway was built, people passed by too fast and the highway was so narrow, you took a big risk to lose your concentration to wave or look for their wave.
This is exactly my thought. I try to stay focused like a laser beam on the road at all times - no way I am looking at oncoming drivers to wave, etc. Also carry no dog or passengers to distract. I need all the help I can get!!!



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Gulliver
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 09:05 AM


To get to my beloved back roads I often have to ride my bike down the pavement. I hate it but what the heck.

My Summer home is on Lopez Island in the San Juan islands of Washington. For ever and ever we have waved to oncoming drivers. We don't always know who they are but it's a pleasant habit.

Thus I automatically wave a lot down here. The results are interesting. The big truck drivers always grin and wave back. Mexicans under a certain age also wave. Young guys driving crazy fast in red pickups (what is it about red pickups and crazy drivers?) don't even seem to see me.

Gringos, if they respond at all, seem startled and sometimes act as though I was warning them of a hazard.

Sadly, we live in an age of isolation and alienation.
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 10:14 AM


Quote: Originally posted by woody with a view  
Ged is pretty cool!


Perhaps a move to SoCal would help.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NwzaxUF0k18
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Gulliver
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 10:22 AM


Ha! That's so great.

A bunch of them were in the square today. They drive a better car these days. Their guts stick out further and the tropical shirts and shorts are mind boggling.

These people have been around for ever. Read Barn Burning by Faulkner and A Walk on the Wild Side by Nelson Algren. The gene pool runs deep.
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 10:23 AM


Don Jorge's primary point, I think, is that Americans that visit Baja now are different than those in the past.

I agree.

Trips to Baja used to be expeditions, explorations. Now the tourist just flies by in their air conditioned vehicles. With the comfort and convenience came a change in attitude.
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 10:27 AM


As in the song . . .

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/simongarfunkel/the59thstreetb...
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David K
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[*] posted on 4-14-2017 at 11:41 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Skipjack Joe  
Don Jorge's primary point, I think, is that Americans that visit Baja now are different than those in the past.

I agree.

Trips to Baja used to be expeditions, explorations. Now the tourist just flies by in their air conditioned vehicles. With the comfort and convenience came a change in attitude.


Bad roads brought good people.
Paved roads, not so much!




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Marc
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[*] posted on 4-16-2017 at 08:35 AM


We stopped to help a Mexican couple. While I was under their hood, two guys tried to steal my truck

Okay - okay! I would have stopped.

On another note: Us Porsche drivers used to flick our headlights when coming on. Common practice 50 years ago. Not any more. Porsche drivers nowadays are jerks! (not me!)
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[*] posted on 4-16-2017 at 11:01 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Skipjack Joe  
Don Jorge's primary point, I think, is that Americans that visit Baja now are different than those in the past.

I agree.

Trips to Baja used to be expeditions, explorations. Now the tourist just flies by in their air conditioned vehicles. With the comfort and convenience came a change in attitude.


I've told friends that the old Baja crowd of 40+ years ago may have been a bit rough around the edges but all in all I preferred them. A bit of eccentricity was not only tolerated but somewhat expected.
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[*] posted on 4-17-2017 at 06:50 PM


Some ppl are just looking for things to cry about on here. Ppl still wave on slow roads.

And get out on the water sometime. Almost all boaters wave at each other.
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[*] posted on 4-17-2017 at 07:32 PM


a few days ago we broke down in a spot we couldnt pull over much and were sticking out on the highway and an awesome Mexicano family stopped and helped us push the truck and boat off the road. Then he worked on our truck for a half hour...tried every trick in the book but the engine was toast.

I hitch hiked back to San Igancio to get a mechanic/tow vehicle and I bet 20 cars passed me...lots of em gringos...the one car that stopped ended up being our nephew from San Hipolito...jajajaja...pretty awesome.

We generally stop for accidents if it appears they need extra support and usually for broken down folks too depending on the situation.

Oh and Motoged is a lover not a hater.




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[*] posted on 4-18-2017 at 05:13 AM


To those who presume that Sarah was implying that if Americans had stopped, her problems would all have simply disappeared, you are wrong. She simply stated that in a moment of complete chaos, and uncertainty, the comfort of strangers can do wonders. I don't even think she was asking for examples on when you would or wouldn't stop to help others. The point is that at that moment when she looked up, familiar faces seemed to drive on, content with letting others take over. That is a fair assumption and not an indictment of anyone.

And to whoever implied that he understands that you needed comfort in your native tongue because "you are a woman" I just don't understand where such statements come from.

Sarah, I replied to your blog, here's a copy of it:

Hi Sarah, thank you for sharing your experience. I don’t imagine that I’m the first to say this, or at least I hope I’m not, but the feelings you are describing after your accident are those of a person who is experiencing PTSD. You went through a life changing event that affected not only you but those you are responsible for. It makes perfect sense that you are feeling the way you do. And considering that your accident happened just a few weeks ago, I’m amazed that you already found the physical, and mental strength to share what happened to you, with others. That’s always a good sign.

After many years of driving up and down the peninsula, I’m still in awe of its beauty, as well as of its dangers. And to this day, I count myself lucky that I haven’t had an accident. Unfortunately, I have had the opportunity, if you can call it that, to stop and assist in several accidents, and as you pointed out, the kindness and willingness of Mexicans to help complete strangers can bring you to tears. And while my experience with Americans who have stopped to help has always been positive, it saddens me that your experience wasn’t the same. I hope it’s not because of a lack of caring because that would definitely mark a break with tradition, and the end of an era.

I hope you continue to recover both physically and mentally, at the pace your body and mind call for.


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[*] posted on 4-18-2017 at 03:17 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Don Jorge  
Our last trip down and back I continued my usual practice of the casual windshield wave to oncoming traffic on Hwy 1. Only 1 American returned the wave all others refusing to acknowledge the presence of someone else in their world. A sign of the change that has taken place in Baja over the 48 years we have been traveling to and from Baja. Of course the truckers wave back often.


After an accident 10 years ago N. of SI, I got serious about driving 1 and the reality of how dangerous the road can be.

I do not wave and do not look at oncoming drivers on Highway 1. I focus on the road watching oncoming traffic at a distance. When I pass another vehicle, I grip the steering wheel a bit tighter and brace my arms more -- the way I do when a semi passes and I get pushed by the wind. I fully expect an oncoming car to cross into my lane and I'm watching to make sure that doesn't happen.

My impression of semi drivers is that they are young and inexperienced. I've had too many close calls with semis who passed me -- I don't want to be pushed off the road or side swiped. I've seen too many semi roll overs where it's obvious they took the turn too fast.

Anyone taking their eyes and hand off the road to wave is being reckless and endangering my life.

I wave on dirt roads and in small towns. It's a nice custom.

I'm paranoid, but happy, driving the road and don't want trouble. I've had too many life changing experiences and Baja is the last place for my next one.

Call me self absorbed.




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[*] posted on 4-18-2017 at 03:54 PM


They used to not grind the roadways in Baja before re-paving , they just added more pavement.
I've seen road shoulders 18" tall, if you drop a wheel its 50/50 on flipping your vehicle.

The 12% grade into Santa Rosalia is one of the steepest in North America.
When I went down it in an 18 wheeler, my brother the driver told me to jump out if he missed a downshift :(

I have seen numerous collisions during entry and exit from the highway 1 , the speed differentials from pave to unpaved roads makes bad stuff happen quick.

I'm one of those porcupines (AKA as a Prick) in a Porsche.
I drive my 88 Toyota 4wd truck in Baja like I'm on the race track in my Porsche to be safe, you look FAR ahead and think of what other drivers might do.
BTW, you will always drive into what ever you are staring at, look at the road horizon, front of the hood, instruments, mirrors, repeat until your there.




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[*] posted on 4-18-2017 at 04:09 PM


I totally agree, Ted. In August 2003 I hauled a friend's belongings from Mulege to Washington State, my pickup / camper shell filled to the max and pulling a 21' car-tote trailer, also piled up with 'cosas de la casa'. I measured the road bed from center line to the edge of the pavement in an older section of highway somewhere between Jesus Maria and Cataviña.... the asphalt was right at 9' wide. I measured my trailer tires on the flatbed... 8' 7 & 1/2". Needless to say, WHITE KNUCKLE FLIGHT the whole way to the border. Never been so happy as to see U.S. pavement again, even the Tecate - Campo stretch was a relief. I even stopped at a truck stop for a quit-shaking break and chatted with a couple of semi drivers, asked 'em if I could measure their wheel bases.... I believe they were 8'6". I have the utmost respect for Baja haulers, especially fuel and propane tankers. 99% of them are very helpful and respectful of everyone on the road. All my years of hauling a trailer or a 5th wheel taught me to fall in with them and when they speed up, I can... and when they slow, I do too.

Needless to say, I did NO waving on that run. Nor do I anyway; that road demands respect. Too many cruceros not to.

Oh, and BTW my guidebook sez the Questo del Infierno is a 13 & 1/2% grade. It's always a sphincter-factor of 5 on the one-to-five scale for me, and I used to jump out of perfectly good airplanes.

[Edited on 4-18-2017 by bajabuddha]




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