BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3
Author: Subject: crazy rain in Northern Baja
Bajaboy
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3865
Registered: 10-9-2003
Location: Spring Valley/Bahia Asuncion
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:03 AM
crazy rain in Northern Baja


Yesterday in Spring Valley, we received a record 1.7 inches of rain. How far into Baja did the rain reach?

Sure seems like our weather patterns are changing despite what some might say about a palm tree:light:




View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 50370
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:09 AM


Weather always changes... climates do too but over longer time periods.

The palm tree photos over the past 60 years are proof that the sea level has not changed in any of our lifetimes any amount that should cause the panic that some love to have.

A wet year followed by several dry years is NORMAL in this region of the world. The English wheat farming colony (Old Mill) at San Quintin was developed during a wet period and when multiple (normal) dry years followed, their colony (which did not have irrigation) failed.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 10467
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:22 AM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Weather always changes... climates do too but over longer time periods.

The palm tree photos over the past 60 years are proof that the sea level has not changed in any of our lifetimes any amount that should cause the panic that some love to have.

A wet year followed by several dry years is NORMAL in this region of the world. The English wheat farming colony (Old Mill) at San Quintin was developed during a wet period and when multiple (normal) dry years followed, their colony (which did not have irrigation) failed.


Your willfull ignorance is amusing! Thank you for providing our morning funnies!

I got 2" of precip. My yard likes it.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 50370
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:29 AM


Facts are facts.



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
carlosg
Nomad
**




Posts: 370
Registered: 5-28-2012
Location: chula vista, ca
Member Is Offline

Mood: Just like in Baja: No Bad Days...

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:37 AM


Growing up in Tecate I learned (heard it) from the old ranchers that a dry spell of seven years was followed by a seven year wet spell, it may not make much scientific sense but it sure made (and still does today) make common sense... who knows... I'm no scientist... I only live here...



...work to camp and fish.... dream to be there....

http://aquapropoolandspaservice.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Cliffy
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 670
Registered: 12-19-2013
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:41 AM


Let's see, 10,000 yrs ago we had glaciers from the North Pole to Arkansas and 40 or so years ago "scientists" were predicting another "Ice Age"
Follow the money

Prognostications over questionable data collected (by even the guy who collected it) over too short a period of astronomic time lead to, at best, wildly exaggerated future consequences of such "bent" data.

I've got my "Mae West" waiting for the rising sea levels to come :-)
It's been sitting there for 18 years but nothing has happened in that time frame.

We aren't even near the wind and solar power scams discussion yet-
but that's for another time and place.
Soap box put away for now - sorry for the drift.




You chose your position in life today by what YOU did yesterday
View user's profile
wiltonh
Nomad
**


Avatar


Posts: 248
Registered: 2-2-2007
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 08:59 AM


We were in Southern Baja in the early 70s and picked up a hick-hiker. The person said they owned a cattle ranch out in the desert. It had not rained at his ranch for 8 years. He said that if it did not rain that year, he would have to sell all of his cattle. He made it sound like this was not the first time it had happened.

If you ask the locals in Southern Baja their thoughts on hurricanes, they like them. This is where they get their rain. The positive affects of the rain offset the negative affects of the wind.

Right now the whole West Coast is in a wet period. The only sure thing is that it will be followed by a dry period.
View user's profile
BigBearRider
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1001
Registered: 4-30-2015
Location: L.A., Big Bear, and Punta Chivato
Member Is Offline

Mood: :)

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 09:14 AM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Weather always changes... climates do too but over longer time periods.

The palm tree photos over the past 60 years are proof that the sea level has not changed in any of our lifetimes any amount that should cause the panic that some love to have.

A wet year followed by several dry years is NORMAL in this region of the world. The English wheat farming colony (Old Mill) at San Quintin was developed during a wet period and when multiple (normal) dry years followed, their colony (which did not have irrigation) failed.


David, please.

Do you think anyone can reasonably draw a scientific conclusion that sea levels have not changed based on the photos you keep referencing?

For starters, we don't know whether the initial photos were taken at high tide, and the last photos taken at low tide, vice versa, or anywhere in between, so how high up on the beach the water reaches is not very informative.

I assume that you are a flat earther, too?

[Edited to insert a missing "are" in last sentence.]

[Edited on 5-8-2017 by BigBearRider]
View user's profile
SFandH
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 4272
Registered: 8-5-2011
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 09:25 AM


Forget it BigBearRider, he's not going to change his mind and yes he thinks the palm tree at Playa Coyote disproves the oceans are rising.

As far as the rain in the border region is concerned, I love it. It cleans things off, including the atmosphere which can get pretty thick in the San Diego/TJ area, waters the plants, and adds to the reservoirs. This weekend's storm was pretty unusual.
View user's profile
bajabuddha
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 3267
Registered: 4-12-2013
Location: Baja New Mexico
Member Is Offline

Mood: Always cranky unless medicated

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 09:26 AM


Morning funnies is right! Here we go again..... and if ever there was a thread to break the 50K (or is that '50 DK') mark, this is it.... unless of course there are several deletions due to self-repetition. ;)



If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

If it don't stink, don't stir it....

and if it ain't disgusting, it ain't discussed.


View user's profile
Maderita
Nomad
**




Posts: 200
Registered: 12-14-2008
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 09:28 AM


There was snow yesterday in the Sierra de Juarez. Starting at the 5,000' level, but not "sticking." With temps around 37F., it melted before accumulating. Probably lasted a while longer at Laguna Hanson, 1,000' higher in elevation.
View user's profile
bonanza bucko
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 568
Registered: 8-31-2003
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Airport Bum

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 09:39 AM


Some residents of Lake Tahoe dove down to about 100 feet off the shore of the lake and took pictures of large tree stumps down there. So the lake was at least 100 lower when those trees grew and they look like they were several hundred years old. What caused that? Nobody wants to talk about it because it violates the current religion -- "science" ---that man caused all the current "climate change."

Those dudes also don't want to talk about The Great Lakes which were dug by glaciers in the last ice age. The glaciers melted and filled up the lakes. So what made them melt?......you wanna bet it wasn't Cave Men (and Women) BBQing Mastadons?

BB
View user's profile
AKgringo
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1857
Registered: 9-20-2014
Location: Los Anchorage, AK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Retireded

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 09:45 AM


That system wrapped around SoCal and came into the north/central Sierras from the east, dropping about seven inches of snow.

The precipitation for this area is about double the average. Notice I did not say normal, because both drought, and floods are normal!




If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much space!
View user's profile
JZ
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1561
Registered: 10-3-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 10:18 AM


We had thunder in LA yesterday for like the 5th time in 20 years.
View user's profile
monoloco
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 6587
Registered: 7-13-2009
Location: Pescadero BCS
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 10:47 AM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Weather always changes... climates do too but over longer time periods.

The palm tree photos over the past 60 years are proof that the sea level has not changed in any of our lifetimes any amount that should cause the panic that some love to have.

A wet year followed by several dry years is NORMAL in this region of the world. The English wheat farming colony (Old Mill) at San Quintin was developed during a wet period and when multiple (normal) dry years followed, their colony (which did not have irrigation) failed.
You might have a hard time convincing people in places like Bangladesh and Kiribati, who have already been displaced by rising sea levels. The folks that actually measure such things also disagree.
http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/sealevel.html




"The future ain't what it used to be"
View user's profile
BornFisher
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1604
Registered: 1-11-2005
Location: K-38 Santa Martha/Encinitas
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 10:48 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bonanza bucko  
Some residents of Lake Tahoe dove down to about 100 feet off the shore of the lake and took pictures of large tree stumps down there. So the lake was at least 100 lower when those trees grew and they look like they were several hundred years old. What caused that? Nobody wants to talk about it because it violates the current religion -- "science" ---that man caused all the current "climate change."

BB


Dick Cheney`s and Donald Trump`s ancestors?




You can not drink all day. No you can not, unless........... you start in the morning!!!
View user's profile
monoloco
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 6587
Registered: 7-13-2009
Location: Pescadero BCS
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 10:51 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bonanza bucko  
Some residents of Lake Tahoe dove down to about 100 feet off the shore of the lake and took pictures of large tree stumps down there. So the lake was at least 100 lower when those trees grew and they look like they were several hundred years old. What caused that? Nobody wants to talk about it because it violates the current religion -- "science" ---that man caused all the current "climate change."

Those dudes also don't want to talk about The Great Lakes which were dug by glaciers in the last ice age. The glaciers melted and filled up the lakes. So what made them melt?......you wanna bet it wasn't Cave Men (and Women) BBQing Mastadons?

BB
I don't know anything about the geology of Lake Tahoe, but given the seismic activity in California, do you suppose that there could possibly have been some sort of subsidence event that could explain the tree trunks?



"The future ain't what it used to be"
View user's profile
willardguy
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 4935
Registered: 9-19-2009
Location: bahia willard
Member Is Offline

Mood: im good

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 10:56 AM


serious soaking in puerto nuevo area....and COLD!
View user's profile
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 10467
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 11:18 AM


Quote: Originally posted by monoloco  
Quote: Originally posted by bonanza bucko  
Some residents of Lake Tahoe dove down to about 100 feet off the shore of the lake and took pictures of large tree stumps down there. So the lake was at least 100 lower when those trees grew and they look like they were several hundred years old. What caused that? Nobody wants to talk about it because it violates the current religion -- "science" ---that man caused all the current "climate change."

Those dudes also don't want to talk about The Great Lakes which were dug by glaciers in the last ice age. The glaciers melted and filled up the lakes. So what made them melt?......you wanna bet it wasn't Cave Men (and Women) BBQing Mastadons?

BB
I don't know anything about the geology of Lake Tahoe, but given the seismic activity in California, do you suppose that there could possibly have been some sort of subsidence event that could explain the tree trunks?


Trees submerged in lake tahoe are known to have grown during a mega drought, they have been dated.
The mega droughts from the middle ages are pretty much irrelevant to current global warming caused by man

[Edited on 5-8-2017 by mtgoat666]
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 50370
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 5-8-2017 at 11:20 AM


Quote: Originally posted by monoloco  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Weather always changes... climates do too but over longer time periods.

The palm tree photos over the past 60 years are proof that the sea level has not changed in any of our lifetimes any amount that should cause the panic that some love to have.

A wet year followed by several dry years is NORMAL in this region of the world. The English wheat farming colony (Old Mill) at San Quintin was developed during a wet period and when multiple (normal) dry years followed, their colony (which did not have irrigation) failed.
You might have a hard time convincing people in places like Bangladesh and Kiribati, who have already been displaced by rising sea levels. The folks that actually measure such things also disagree.
http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/sealevel.html


Because some lands are compressing (lowering) does not mean the sea is higher.

I can still drive on a salt flat that is inches above typical high tide and gets flooded at extreme high tides, as I have for nearly 40 years.

Why is this salt flat still only flooded at extreme high tides and not every high tide or underwater all the time?

Look around Baja... the salt flats (that became salt flats from natural high tides) are still above the sea most of the year... and not underwater.

When Scammon's and San Ignacio (and all other) lagoons are twice the size from covering the vast salt flats that extend inland from them your statement will be proven. On a closer observation, the streets along the beaches in California are still just as far above high tide as they were in the 1940s when built. The bottom of piers over the ocean still have as much air between them and the average sea level, and the breakwaters at our harbors are still above the sea to block waves. Boat launch ramps are still functioning after being built in the 1950s.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A NEW Baja Missions History book in 2016: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 40) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

View user's profile Visit user's homepage
 Pages:  1    3

  Go To Top


For high speed satellite internet in Baja call +1.6197170810 - or click here to email sistemassatelitales@hotmail.com



Tijuana Walking Tours - on Meetup.com


 






All Content Copyright © 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group 






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

 

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

 

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

 

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262