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BajaTed
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[*] posted on 9-4-2017 at 10:16 AM


Think a lot about the context of where your home is going to be and design accordingly. You are going to be living in a place with serious security concerns

Have a big gate in front of your front door. (two levels of ingress security)

If you have outside windows at first floor level, consider glass building bricks, they are a big deterrent. (Our cleaning lady taught us that one.)

Our house is one story, but from front looks like two, I got a walkway up there, when times are bad the high ground is a tactical advantage.

prepare for the worst, hope for the best





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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-5-2017 at 02:00 PM


Yes thank you. All.
I am trying to figure out how to begin.
And when to begin.
I figure I will be stuck here in Washington for another 5 years so I trying to figure out how to begin this from afar. So it will be in parts.
Again thank you for tolerating my questions.




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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-5-2017 at 02:03 PM


Quote: Originally posted by BajaTed  
Think a lot about the context of where your home is going to be and design accordingly. You are going to be living in a place with serious security concerns

Have a big gate in front of your front door. (two levels of ingress security)

If you have outside windows at first floor level, consider glass building bricks, they are a big deterrent. (Our cleaning lady taught us that one.)

Our house is one story, but from front looks like two, I got a walkway up there, when times are bad the high ground is a tactical advantage.

prepare for the worst, hope for the best


I was thinking the same. It needs to be a miny fortress without looking like one. I like the glass block idea.




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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-5-2017 at 02:09 PM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by DENNIS  

Speaking of septic tanks.....they can be challenging depending on where yours will be in relation to sea-level.
Most contractors here don't have a clue as to the theory and building of a septic tank and leech field. Consequently, they build cesspools.....a pit in the ground with holes in the side walls and floor to drain into the surrounding ground.
The "challenging" and "sea-level" part will become apparent when you think about this. Too close to sea-saturated soil, and it will be a problem.
Your next problem may just be the strengthening Ecology Department that will take you to task for crapping in the ocean. They hate that.


Would be good if the govt had a permit program to ensure septic systems were adequately designed, set back from surface waters, and built only on lots that perc.
Based on preceding questions, it appears that fishybuck has a property that is all rock, won't perc, and his cess pool will leak raw (minimally filtered) sewage to the bay. :no::no::barf:


This is a tricky one. I want one of those fancy tanks that can make clean water out of the waste water.
It's hard to figure out where to put it. As far from the bay as possible. Either back corner of my lot. But that is also my driveway parking area.
So what to do?

[Edited on 9-6-2017 by fishbuck]




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yumawill
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[*] posted on 9-5-2017 at 02:53 PM


And I thought a "perc" was something a breaucrat put in his pocket. Silly me.
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DENNIS
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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 06:26 AM


[rquote=1092876&tid=87538&author=
This is a tricky one. I want one of those fancy tanks that can make clean water out of the waste water.
It's hard to figure out where to put it. As far from the bay as possible. Either back corner of my lot. But that is also my driveway parking area.
So what to do? [Edited on 9-6-2017 by fishbuck][/rquote]
=========================

Not sure of what you have in mind, Mike. There's a lot more to waste than liquids.
If you're thinking of a composting toilet....they require electricity just like any other cooking unit.




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BajaUtah
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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 07:32 AM


Quote: Originally posted by DENNIS  

=========================

Not sure of what you have in mind, Mike. There's a lot more to waste than liquids.
If you're thinking of a composting toilet....they require electricity just like any other cooking unit.


He is thinking of an aerobic system vs an anerobic system. The aerobic requires a bubbler or some method of forcing air into the sludge. The go to unit here in Baja Sur is the Mighty Mac. It requires power 24/7 to the bubbler. Mine draws about an amp. It is actually the law here in the East Cape (maybe other areas) that the aerobic system be used.

The discharge on my system is clear and odorless - not potable. We run it just under the surface in a weeping pipe to irrigate some bushes.




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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 07:37 AM



That's what I thought. I also was under the impression that he was going to be a bit too rural for an appliance like this.

http://mightymac.com.mx/2011/07/mighty-mac/




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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 12:35 PM


Yeah that's it. The mighty mack. Didn't realize it required 24 hour electricity but sounds like another solar power issue.




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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 01:00 PM


https://tgwastewater.com/hiblow-hp-80-pond-or-septic-air-pum...

This is the type of bubbler they use. You might be able to find a 12v unit that runs directly off panels but unless you can you need to cover the 120v-1.6a draw via an inverter




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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 01:39 PM


I thought I would get laid off a few months ago again. But the layoff bottomed out about 15 people from me.
I was hoping for a year or so off to go hang out at my camp and figure it out. We have generous lay off benie.
So I am rethinking it.
I know need to figure out how to get this done or at least begin from 2000 miles away.
I think I 've heard the 1st stage called the dirt plan or the dirt map or something like that.
I was an apprentice plumber on new home construction early in my life so I know a little about roughong the lot etc.
But that was a while ago.
Does anyone know where to get a mighty mack in Ensenda or Tijuana.
I suppose finding 1 is a good start.





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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 08:09 PM


A bag of lime, string and pieces of rebar is where you start, process hasn't changed much.

The hardest skill to find in Mexico is project management.

five years you say; pour a concrete pad that can eventually be used for your home (garage, carport,patio, etc) and put a small trailer on it and go from there over the years. (Pad helps keep the scorpions visible) Seen the approach used many times and you'll find out over time what your security situation is also at the same time.





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[*] posted on 9-6-2017 at 09:08 PM


Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
I thought I would get laid off a few months ago again. But the layoff bottomed out about 15 people from me.
I was hoping for a year or so off to go hang out at my camp and figure it out. We have generous lay off benie.
So I am rethinking it.
I know need to figure out how to get this done or at least begin from 2000 miles away.
I think I 've heard the 1st stage called the dirt plan or the dirt map or something like that.
I was an apprentice plumber on new home construction early in my life so I know a little about roughong the lot etc.
But that was a while ago.
Does anyone know where to get a mighty mack in Ensenda or Tijuana.
I suppose finding 1 is a good start.



"Dirt map?" Ya, that's what you need! :lol:

The first thing you need to do is scrape the lot, fence-to-fence, so you kill all native vegetation, and the lot can be taken over by weeds. Throw down some white-painted rocks and you got landscaping. That's the way most developers do it for postage-stamp size waterfront lots. Gringos seem to like the look.

Weedy lot, trailer on a concrete pad, a leaking cess pool -- you'll be living in style!


[Edited on 9-7-2017 by mtgoat666]
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Martyman
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[*] posted on 9-7-2017 at 05:24 AM


Do not put power to your septic, electricity in your poo tank will fail. Go passive with a decent gravity flow system. Go fishing, besides...it hardly fecal matters.
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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-7-2017 at 07:26 PM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
I thought I would get laid off a few months ago again. But the layoff bottomed out about 15 people from me.
I was hoping for a year or so off to go hang out at my camp and figure it out. We have generous lay off benie.
So I am rethinking it.
I know need to figure out how to get this done or at least begin from 2000 miles away.
I think I 've heard the 1st stage called the dirt plan or the dirt map or something like that.
I was an apprentice plumber on new home construction early in my life so I know a little about roughong the lot etc.
But that was a while ago.
Does anyone know where to get a mighty mack in Ensenda or Tijuana.
I suppose finding 1 is a good start.



"Dirt map?" Ya, that's what you need! :lol:

The first thing you need to do is scrape the lot, fence-to-fence, so you kill all native vegetation, and the lot can be taken over by weeds. Throw down some white-painted rocks and you got landscaping. That's the way most developers do it for postage-stamp size waterfront lots. Gringos seem to like the look.

Weedy lot, trailer on a concrete pad, a leaking cess pool -- you'll be living in style!


[Edited on 9-7-2017 by mtgoat666]


Yes a "dirt map". That is what it's called. Sort of a blueprint for where to move dirt dig, holes etc.
Half the lot was "scraped" at some time in the past. The other lot is where they piled up the "scrapings" including some large boulders that I'm really not sure how big or deep they are. Both lots are outlined with the perverbial white painted rocks to mark property lines.
It was thickly weed grown at one point. There was a covey of quail living there and some cotton tail bunnies.
But the caretaker cleared the weeds at some point and the animals are gone.
I plan to start with the flatest corner which is also where the best view is.
It won't take much to level that for the cement pad. I think I can do that part by hand with a shovel.
I want my little casita to open to ground level.
I want to be very careful with the septic tank. I hope the neighbors have also. But there is rarely anyone there so probably not much to worry about.
Plus the water in the bay is monitored very closely by Terra and is the subject of ongoing scientific reseach from visiting universties and colleges. So I sure they will be quick to cry foul if the water has human pathogens detected in it.
Thank you for all the replies. Helpful and otherwise.

[Edited on 9-8-2017 by fishbuck]




"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

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Sr.vienes
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[*] posted on 9-7-2017 at 08:02 PM


Some folks from a state to the west of us here in Arizona moved into a canyon outside the city limits. They bought an existing place downstream from the dairy and decided to drill their own well "holy crap there's crap in our water" they said. They called everyone to be called and soon had the dairyman on the hot coals, he read their water test results and said folks that's people poop not cow poop. They had drilled through their own leach field, about 15k later they had it fixed. Plan ahead, take measurements and pictures of everything you bury cause you ain't gonna remember where it is.
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[*] posted on 9-7-2017 at 08:44 PM



it ain't a "dirt map." It's a "grading plan."


Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
I thought I would get laid off a few months ago again. But the layoff bottomed out about 15 people from me.
I was hoping for a year or so off to go hang out at my camp and figure it out. We have generous lay off benie.
So I am rethinking it.
I know need to figure out how to get this done or at least begin from 2000 miles away.
I think I 've heard the 1st stage called the dirt plan or the dirt map or something like that.
I was an apprentice plumber on new home construction early in my life so I know a little about roughong the lot etc.
But that was a while ago.
Does anyone know where to get a mighty mack in Ensenda or Tijuana.
I suppose finding 1 is a good start.



"Dirt map?" Ya, that's what you need! :lol:

The first thing you need to do is scrape the lot, fence-to-fence, so you kill all native vegetation, and the lot can be taken over by weeds. Throw down some white-painted rocks and you got landscaping. That's the way most developers do it for postage-stamp size waterfront lots. Gringos seem to like the look.

Weedy lot, trailer on a concrete pad, a leaking cess pool -- you'll be living in style!


[Edited on 9-7-2017 by mtgoat666]


Yes a "dirt map". That is what it's called. Sort of a blueprint for where to move dirt dig, holes etc.
Half the lot was "scraped" at some time in the past. The other lot is where they piled up the "scrapings" including some large boulders that I'm really not sure how big or deep they are. Both lots are outlined with the perverbial white painted rocks to mark property lines.
It was thickly weed grown at one point. There was a covey of quail living there and some cotton tail bunnies.
But the caretaker cleared the weeds at some point and the animals are gone.
I plan to start with the flatest corner which is also where the best view is.
It won't take much to level that for the cement pad. I think I can do that part by hand with a shovel.
I want my little casita to open to ground level.
I want to be very careful with the septic tank. I hope the neighbors have also. But there is rarely anyone there so probably not much to worry about.
Plus the water in the bay is monitored very closely by Terra and is the subject of ongoing scientific reseach from visiting universties and colleges. So I sure they will be quick to cry foul if the water has human pathogens detected in it.
Thank you for all the replies. Helpful and otherwise.

[Edited on 9-8-2017 by fishbuck]
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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 9-8-2017 at 01:51 PM


Thank you for correcting me on this fine technical detail. I shall never make this mistake again when discribing my dirt map er I mean grading plan.:coolup:

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  

it ain't a "dirt map." It's a "grading plan."


Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
I thought I would get laid off a few months ago again. But the layoff bottomed out about 15 people from me.
I was hoping for a year or so off to go hang out at my camp and figure it out. We have generous lay off benie.
So I am rethinking it.
I know need to figure out how to get this done or at least begin from 2000 miles away.
I think I 've heard the 1st stage called the dirt plan or the dirt map or something like that.
I was an apprentice plumber on new home construction early in my life so I know a little about roughong the lot etc.
But that was a while ago.
Does anyone know where to get a mighty mack in Ensenda or Tijuana.
I suppose finding 1 is a good start.



"Dirt map?" Ya, that's what you need! :lol:

The first thing you need to do is scrape the lot, fence-to-fence, so you kill all native vegetation, and the lot can be taken over by weeds. Throw down some white-painted rocks and you got landscaping. That's the way most developers do it for postage-stamp size waterfront lots. Gringos seem to like the look.

Weedy lot, trailer on a concrete pad, a leaking cess pool -- you'll be living in style!


[Edited on 9-7-2017 by mtgoat666]


Yes a "dirt map". That is what it's called. Sort of a blueprint for where to move dirt dig, holes etc.
Half the lot was "scraped" at some time in the past. The other lot is where they piled up the "scrapings" including some large boulders that I'm really not sure how big or deep they are. Both lots are outlined with the perverbial white painted rocks to mark property lines.
It was thickly weed grown at one point. There was a covey of quail living there and some cotton tail bunnies.
But the caretaker cleared the weeds at some point and the animals are gone.
I plan to start with the flatest corner which is also where the best view is.
It won't take much to level that for the cement pad. I think I can do that part by hand with a shovel.
I want my little casita to open to ground level.
I want to be very careful with the septic tank. I hope the neighbors have also. But there is rarely anyone there so probably not much to worry about.
Plus the water in the bay is monitored very closely by Terra and is the subject of ongoing scientific reseach from visiting universties and colleges. So I sure they will be quick to cry foul if the water has human pathogens detected in it.
Thank you for all the replies. Helpful and otherwise.

[Edited on 9-8-2017 by fishbuck]




"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

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[*] posted on 9-8-2017 at 02:21 PM


I almost hate to mention this because is so basic, but make sure that gravity alone will deliver your gray and black water products to their treatment system!

A neighbor with acreage next to mine planted a few fruit trees in the best spot to place his house. Two years later, rather than move or sacrifice the sapling fruit trees, he placed his modular house below them.

Although his goal was to eventually get off grid, he now has to pump his sh*t up hill!

[Edited on 9-8-2017 by AKgringo]




If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much space!

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[*] posted on 9-8-2017 at 03:08 PM


Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
Thank you for correcting me on this fine technical detail. I shall never make this mistake again when discribing my dirt map er I mean grading plan.:coolup:

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  

it ain't a "dirt map." It's a "grading plan."


Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by fishbuck  
I thought I would get laid off a few months ago again. But the layoff bottomed out about 15 people from me.
I was hoping for a year or so off to go hang out at my camp and figure it out. We have generous lay off benie.
So I am rethinking it.
I know need to figure out how to get this done or at least begin from 2000 miles away.
I think I 've heard the 1st stage called the dirt plan or the dirt map or something like that.
I was an apprentice plumber on new home construction early in my life so I know a little about roughong the lot etc.
But that was a while ago.
Does anyone know where to get a mighty mack in Ensenda or Tijuana.
I suppose finding 1 is a good start.



"Dirt map?" Ya, that's what you need! :lol:

The first thing you need to do is scrape the lot, fence-to-fence, so you kill all native vegetation, and the lot can be taken over by weeds. Throw down some white-painted rocks and you got landscaping. That's the way most developers do it for postage-stamp size waterfront lots. Gringos seem to like the look.

Weedy lot, trailer on a concrete pad, a leaking cess pool -- you'll be living in style!


[Edited on 9-7-2017 by mtgoat666]


Yes a "dirt map". That is what it's called. Sort of a blueprint for where to move dirt dig, holes etc.
Half the lot was "scraped" at some time in the past. The other lot is where they piled up the "scrapings" including some large boulders that I'm really not sure how big or deep they are. Both lots are outlined with the perverbial white painted rocks to mark property lines.
It was thickly weed grown at one point. There was a covey of quail living there and some cotton tail bunnies.
But the caretaker cleared the weeds at some point and the animals are gone.
I plan to start with the flatest corner which is also where the best view is.
It won't take much to level that for the cement pad. I think I can do that part by hand with a shovel.
I want my little casita to open to ground level.
I want to be very careful with the septic tank. I hope the neighbors have also. But there is rarely anyone there so probably not much to worry about.
Plus the water in the bay is monitored very closely by Terra and is the subject of ongoing scientific reseach from visiting universties and colleges. So I sure they will be quick to cry foul if the water has human pathogens detected in it.
Thank you for all the replies. Helpful and otherwise.

[Edited on 9-8-2017 by fishbuck]


on second thought,... in your case the correct term is "dirt map."
:lol::lol::lol:
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