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Author: Subject: The Desert heat will kill
willardguy
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[*] posted on 10-20-2017 at 09:54 PM


Quote: Originally posted by EnsenadaDr  
What I am saying Willard is to exercise in 80 degree heat for an extended period of time and likely to go into the 100s that time of year can cause dehydration and exhaustion if hiking for miles especially for the senior crowd which evidently you are not a part of if you think it is no big deal.


um no....this is what you said "Stay out of the heat!! Do not hike in the midday sun, and start early and end early in the day. Temperatures over 80 degrees need to be avoided completely while hiking. It's common sense yet many refuse to heed the warning. Even with youth, water and food and a car at this young couple's disposal they didn't win against the cruel desert environment."



[Edited on 10-21-2017 by willardguy]
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JZ
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 01:28 AM


I go hiking in 90-100 temps all the time.

Op needs to get back on her meds.


[Edited on 10-21-2017 by JZ]
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EnsenadaDr
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 06:17 AM


I don't know what you mean by stretch out those legs I don't frequent watering holes i.e. bars I do not drink on a daily or weekly basis. I am an asthmatic and I cannot hike in hot weather but I do frequent the local fitness center and do spinning in La Mision. I don't take psych meds JZ. Why some of you have to be cruel and mean is beyond me.

[Edited on 10-21-2017 by EnsenadaDr]
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bajatrailrider
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 08:21 AM


Heat stroke not even funny JZ nobody knows this more then me. Doing the most hard single track in Baja. The last run I warned the whole group about heat stroke. I'm very careful as I'm always the oldest rider in the pack. Last run young LAPD detective 35 years old works out 5 days a week. Riding Missing link trail. From my words before that boiling hot day after less then 1 mile. Made U turn on trail as he was getting heat stroke. Made it to the beach jumped in water. Many people are not aware there getting heat stroke. On that run first mile I used up 2 liters of electrolyte powered replenisher. Water will not save you I never ever worried about this in my younger days. After seeing riders in the last 12 years half my age get heat stroke. One in So cal lost his life I take it very serous. Don't be calling out the the DR not even funny.
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EnsenadaDr
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 09:54 AM


My son in Morocco went surfing a few hours during the middle of the afternoon. He's a very healthy raw vegan. The sun there is very strong was no higher than in the 80's. He got very nauseated and dizzy. Diagnosis? Heat stroke. It can creep up on you very unexpected.
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 11:05 AM


A young top athlete Soccer player from Mulege was overcome with heatstroke at Soccer practice playing at College level in the US. After a year in the hospital and kidney and liver transplants he has still not recovered enough to leave continuous care. Very serious consequences if you do not recognize heatstroke symptoms in time. Hospital care on this level blows past One million dollars very quickly.
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del mar
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 11:26 AM


no question heatstroke is a nasty customer....but if your core temperature is reaching 104 degrees hiking in 80 degree weather you have some serious issues you need to take a look at.:light:
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EnsenadaDr
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 11:46 AM


Your core temp is already 98.6. Dehydration can cause it to go up as a fever can. By the time you reach 104 you will not survive much longer. Easily can go over 100 degrees and if you have health issues this can be a serious problem.
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thebajarunner
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 02:59 PM


Who was to know that all those years hiking in Yosemite where the mid day temps are in the 90s would kill me.
I need to send my kids back up Half Dome, Yosemite Falls, Clouds Rest and all the rest of those long grunts in the noon day sun to see if my bones are resting alongside the trail....

So, on a more serious note, those of us that hike constantly in the Sierra know that keeping up our water intake is a lot more important than worrying about ambient temps. 60+ years of trekking those sunny summer trails make the 80 degree temp a non-issue.
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Sr.vienes
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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 03:20 PM


Having lived my entire 65 years in Mohave County Arizona and most of them as an out in the sun all day pipeline contractor, I have seen a lot of guys have to be cooled down. Some of the companies we work for have a ban on on energy drinks on the job site because of heat related and dehydration issues from these drinks, some guys almost have withdrawal issues from this. These things can’t be good for you.



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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 04:59 PM


One small item that hasn't been mentioned in any post here is the difference between heat exhaustion and heat stroke, two entirely different entities. Heat exhaustion is presented by dizziness, nausea, sweating (or not) and possible unconsciousness. Can be rectified by cooling and fluid intake. It truly is a bad situation, no doubt; not making small talk of it. Debilitating to say the least. Treatment is infusion of fluids, cooling of the body, shade, rest, and electrolytes.

However, heat STROKE is when your brain pan heats up and the brain actually goes into shock due to skull temps reaching dangerous levels, and the brain actually bakes. More so than just the body overheating; signs and symptoms include red, dry skin (possible sweating, but by then the system isn't working any more) and very high body temp, above 102 F. This is an acute and dangerous scenario, the body must be cooled as quickly as possible. Brain damage can occur and death is a very heavy possibility. For one to say, "oh, I had heat stroke" is easily professed, but as Lancair mentioned organ damage can result and become a life-threatening and life-changing situation.

As a guide, on hot days in the desert i'd always recommend to the 'party-hearty' crowd to have one full glass of water in between each beer... spent the better part of my life in 100+ temps hiking and boating, with lots of 'cool-down' stops, making sure everyone was sunscreened and safe. Never had to evac any of my personal charges. Just remember the "6 P-s".... Prior Planning Prevents P-Poor Performance.

Apparently the hikers in Joshua Tree didn't know the P's. He had a pistol for protection... just not the right protection. Outa your league, chit happens. Another rule here is in Search and Rescue... when people get lost, they get LOST-ER. This was a tragic story to say the least, and hopefully one or two somewhere will learn a valuable lesson from it.




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[*] posted on 10-21-2017 at 10:11 PM


Accuweather says the high on July 28 was 104 at Twenty Nine Palms.

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