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Author: Subject: La Rumorosa road used in Licence to Kill
Mjd78
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 08:33 PM
La Rumorosa road used in Licence to Kill


Hi all, I’m a James Bond fan and license to kill is one of my favorite movies. It was filmed in 1988 along the rumorosa pass, which apparently was rerouted and reconstructed right around then. The movie was shot on the old part of the highway. I’m going to do the drive in about a month, and wanted to know if anyone knew which road they used and how I could access it. I also am fascinated by this road and want to learn more about it...when it was built, renovated, where the original portions were that were bypassed...etc. Any information anyone has would be greatly appreciated. Thanks a ton!
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 08:57 PM


Is this it? The tanker truck scene? The truck looks like the old Pemex paint scheme. The rocks look about right ...






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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 09:42 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Mjd78  
Hi all, I’m a James Bond fan and license to kill is one of my favorite movies. It was filmed in 1988 along the rumorosa pass, which apparently was rerouted and reconstructed right around then. The movie was shot on the old part of the highway. I’m going to do the drive in about a month, and wanted to know if anyone knew which road they used and how I could access it. I also am fascinated by this road and want to learn more about it...when it was built, renovated, where the original portions were that were bypassed...etc. Any information anyone has would be greatly appreciated. Thanks a ton!


License to ill, way better than license to kill :lol:

If you like chick flicks, titanic was filmed over the hill is Rosarito :light:

Use google earth to see the rumorosa grade.

But seriously,....David K has been collecting baja road construction notes since 1967, he will along shortly to share photos of he and his suby on the road in 1978. He probably has a photo album of his dad driving the old jeep wagoner down rumorosa grade, photos from long before Timothy dalton was born.




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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 09:55 PM


We can't tell you cause its a secret
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 10:41 PM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  

License to ill, way better than license to kill :lol:


Never thought I'd see a Beastie Boys reference on BajaNomad.
:biggrin:




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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 10:47 PM


Ya it looks like the ashpLt becomes a dirt road. And license to Ill is a rad record! I’ll play it when I go there! 🤙🏻
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 10:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by StuckSucks  
Is this it? The tanker truck scene? The truck looks like the old Pemex paint scheme. The rocks look about right ...




That’s it. It’s supposed to be filmed on an abandoned part of the highway
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 11:13 PM


The original paved road is what is now the down hill side. It was both up hill and down hill two lanes before the new section was built going up hill.

Of course the original dirt road may be the old dirt road just to the south that is still usable and has been used by SCORE in some of the Baja 500 and 1000 races.

I read a paper several years ago that told all the details of how and when the paved road was built. I think it was in a newsletter that Discover Baja put out. A very interesting read.
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[*] posted on 1-2-2018 at 11:21 PM


Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
The original paved road is what is now the down hill side. It was both up hill and down hill two lanes before the new section was built going up hill.

Of course the original dirt road may be the old dirt road just to the south that is still usable and has been used by SCORE in some of the Baja 500 and 1000 races.

I read a paper several years ago that told all the details of how and when the paved road was built. I think it was in a newsletter that Discover Baja put out. A very interesting read.


That sounds like a very interesting read. So the eastbound lanes are the original roads...good to know. Thanks for the info.
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 12:41 AM


It appears that License to Kill was filmed on what was at the time a free 'libre" road. It was all asphalt, two lanes. Notorious for fatal accidents. The canyon below was littered with the remains of cars and trucks which had gone over the edge.
"Rumorosa grade" is a common name for Cuesta de Cantú or Cantú Grade, named for a former governor of the territory of Baja California.
La Rumorosa was called "Alaska" many decades ago.
Looks to me that most of the filming was at the higher elevations with domes and huge granitic boulders, elevation 3,000'+.
The new toll highway ("cuota") is now Mex Highway 2D. The free road was Mex 2 and no longer exists between La Rumorosa and the desert.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Federal_Highway_2D

When in the area, you might check out Casa de Piedra and its "mirador" (viewpoint). Park 1/4 mile east of the toll booth (caseta de cobro) on the east end of La Rumorosa. It's easy to miss, so go slow. There may be some banner/flags. Drive in a steep driveway or park next to the highway. My friend Alfredo Vizcarra owns it and charges a few pesos entrance fee. Nice picnic spot.
Or lunch at Cabana del Abuelo, on the free road west side of town, next door to the Pemex station.
An interesting side trip is Vallecitos natural park which has Native American cave paintings. West of La Rumorosa on the cuota, exit at KM68, drive north on graded dirt road approx 1/2 mile. Entrance is a couple dollars with safe parking. A self-guided loop trail takes approx. 45 minutes. 2 hours if you relax and take a lot of photos.


[Edited on 1-3-2018 by Maderita]
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 06:46 AM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  


But seriously,....David K has been collecting baja road construction notes since 1967, he will along shortly to share photos of he and his suby on the road in 1978. He probably has a photo album of his dad driving the old jeep wagoner down rumorosa grade, photos from long before Timothy dalton was born.





Why are you such a dick?
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 09:20 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Maderita  
It appears that License to Kill was filmed on what was at the time a free 'libre" road. It was all asphalt, two lanes. Notorious for fatal accidents. The canyon below was littered with the remains of cars and trucks which had gone over the edge.
"Rumorosa grade" is a common name for Cuesta de Cantú or Cantú Grade, named for a former governor of the territory of Baja California.
La Rumorosa was called "Alaska" many decades ago.
Looks to me that most of the filming was at the higher elevations with domes and huge granitic boulders, elevation 3,000'+.
The new toll highway ("cuota") is now Mex Highway 2D. The free road was Mex 2 and no longer exists between La Rumorosa and the desert.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Federal_Highway_2D

When in the area, you might check out Casa de Piedra and its "mirador" (viewpoint). Park 1/4 mile east of the toll booth (caseta de cobro) on the east end of La Rumorosa. It's easy to miss, so go slow. There may be some banner/flags. Drive in a steep driveway or park next to the highway. My friend Alfredo Vizcarra owns it and charges a few pesos entrance fee. Nice picnic spot.
Or lunch at Cabana del Abuelo, on the free road west side of town, next door to the Pemex station.
An interesting side trip is Vallecitos natural park which has Native American cave paintings. West of La Rumorosa on the cuota, exit at KM68, drive north on graded dirt road approx 1/2 mile. Entrance is a couple dollars with safe parking. A self-guided loop trail takes approx. 45 minutes. 2 hours if you relax and take a lot of photos.


[Edited on 1-3-2018 by Maderita]


Wow,thsnks?! So there’s no access to the free road (old highway 2)? Is there no turn off to that road? I’m going to follow all your suggestions, sound like it would add on to my trip!
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 09:52 AM


I have used the "libremente" from Tecate to La Rumorosa, but I headed south from there to Laguna Hanson. I am pretty sure that there is no paved free road down the mountain from there, but there are several connections to the toll road between the pass and Ensenada.

Where would you be coming from, Mexicali, or Tecate? I am interested in finding the dirt road up the pass from Mexicali, but I don't know where it intersects with hwy 2 at the top.

I drove the toll road from the intersection with hwy 5 to Tecate last December. The spectacular climb was somewhat marred by pea soup fog on the top third of the mountain!




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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 10:07 AM


Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
I have used the "libremente" from Tecate to La Rumorosa, but I headed south from there to Laguna Hanson. I am pretty sure that there is no paved free road down the mountain from there, but there are several connections to the toll road between the pass and Ensenada.

Where would you be coming from, Mexicali, or Tecate? I am interested in finding the dirt road up the pass from Mexicali, but I don't know where it intersects with hwy 2 at the top.

I drove the toll road from the intersection with hwy 5 to Tecate last December. The spectacular climb was somewhat marred by pea soup fog on the top third of the
mountain!


I’m coming from Tecate and doing a day or two of exploring. I have a suv with 4wd and want to go a little off the beaten path.
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 10:22 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Mjd78  
I’m coming from Tecate and doing a day or two of exploring. I have a suv with 4wd and want to go a little off the beaten path.


Here's your "off the beaten path" route -- how about taking the old dirt Rumorosa Road down the hill?







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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 11:29 AM


Another side trip is to drive south from La Rumorosa to the Parque Nacional at Laguna Hanson (small scenic lake), approx 38 miles of dirt road. 2WD except during and after winter storms. Elevations between 4,000' and 6,000' into the pine forests and granite crags of the Sierra de Juárez.

Perhaps visit Rancho el Topo, a working cattle ranch. Horseback riding is available at a reasonable price. Ricardo Sandoval is fluent in English and welcomes visitors. A well-signed turnoff is just beyond the KM35 marker on that road.
https://www.facebook.com/RanchoElTopoSierraDeJuarez/
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 11:43 AM


Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  

I am interested in finding the dirt road up the pass from Mexicali, but I don't know where it intersects with hwy 2 at the top.

AKgringo,
As I recall from 15 or 20 years ago, the dirt road leads to La Rumorosa. Going from La Rumorosa toward the desert, it's somewhat a maze of dirt roads. You could probably just pick a general compass direction. Or preview it on Google Earth to plot your route.

[Edited on 1-3-2018 by Maderita]
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 11:58 AM


Quote: Originally posted by StuckSucks  
Quote: Originally posted by Mjd78  
I’m coming from Tecate and doing a day or two of exploring. I have a suv with 4wd and want to go a little off the beaten path.


Here's your "off the beaten path" route -- how about taking the old dirt Rumorosa Road down the hill?





Yes! That looks awesome. How do I get there? I looked at google maps and there looks like a few different route, but I can’t trace them all the way down the grade
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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 12:15 PM


Use Google Earth to pre-plan your access. We were at La Rumorosa rest stop (just southwest of the toll gate) as Baja 1000 pre-runners were heading for the dirt grade down the mountain passed by on the paved street alongside the highway rest stop bathroom building...

This photo is of the original Hwy. 2 heading to the Cantu Grade from La Rumorosa as seen from the rest stop... Nov. 2008.



In the 1960s, we did drive Hwy. 2 up the grade, once... never again on the old paved road. Many Mexicans back in the day would cross into the United States at Calexico and drive U.S. Hwy. 80 (which became Interstate 8) and cross back at Tijuana until the current 4-lane highway in Mexico was completed. That was before hours-long border waits became the norm after 9-11-2001.




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[*] posted on 1-3-2018 at 12:26 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Mjd78  

Yes! That looks awesome. How do I get there? I looked at google maps and there looks like a few different route, but I can’t trace them all the way down the grade


La Rumorosa Google Maps

If you have problems with high anxiety (thanks, Mel Brooks), you might want to avoid this road. In my Tacoma, several of the switchbacks required multi-point turns. Drop down the switchbacks into the arroyo, then follow it to the toll road at the bottom. If you want, you can easily join the toll road near the military checkpoint/new Pemex station.




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