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Author: Subject: No snow so we must go. Strike mission to picacho del diablo
LukeJobbins
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[*] posted on 2-20-2018 at 08:56 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Maderita  
Congratulations BigBearRider. What an aerobic workout!

AKGringo, surely Luke knows where Pico de Orizaba is located. Sofia also climbs or guides on the big volcanoes, so he made no mistake. Sofia posted from Nevado de Toluca (4th highest) yesterday.

Luke, sounds like you have the serious stoke for climbing. Hit me up if you are interested in rock climbing in the Sierra de Juárez. ClimbBaja {at} aol [dot] com


[Edited on 2-21-2018 by Maderita]


Oh for sure. I am always down for some rock climbing. I’ve never climbed in Juarez so I’m for sure interested in that. And yeah she invited me to go to mainland with her but I am going to school and I don’t think professors would accept climbing mountains as a valid excuse for skipping 2 weeks.
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Maderita
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[*] posted on 2-20-2018 at 09:10 PM


Luke, where are you going to school? The best rock climbing in Baja is only 2 hours from San Diego, in la Sierra de Juárez.
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[*] posted on 2-20-2018 at 10:29 PM


Quote: Originally posted by LukeJobbins  
I did originally go to down to rock climb(boulder), and the rangers knew I was coming solo but they lost internet the day before when the incident happened and they couldn’t warn me to not go. They made it clear to me that it did not matter the reason for visiting, nobody goes in solo. I am not sure if it applies to the observatory. It wouldn’t make sense to deny access to that.


I used to like SPM because there was no one there, and it was almost as good as sierras. Now Mexico says you can’t go for a hike in SPM w/o a babysitter and a hired guide. Crikey!

Maybe time to drive an extra hour and go to the sierras, in the “land of the free”





Make America Decent Again
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BigBearRider
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[*] posted on 2-21-2018 at 02:04 AM


I don't know if I met Sofia on the mountain. Near the peak, I met a young woman from Tijuana named Miriam. She was struggling a little less than I was. We were together for about the last hour. I know that I asked her about Picacho, and she said she had not climbed it yet. Come to think of it, she might have said that she had a friend who was guiding there. I cannot recall exactly. I was in pretty bad shape. On the way down, I ran out of juice completely. I had forgotten to eat and drink almost completely, only consuming 200 calories in solids and 100 calories of Powerade. Very bad. On the way down, I realized what I had done, but was generally too lethargic to grab the food and drink in my backpack. About 30 minutes from the bottom, I think Miriam and a female friend passed me.
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LukeJobbins
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[*] posted on 2-21-2018 at 08:57 AM


Quote: Originally posted by BigBearRider  
I don't know if I met Sofia on the mountain. Near the peak, I met a young woman from Tijuana named Miriam. She was struggling a little less than I was. We were together for about the last hour. I know that I asked her about Picacho, and she said she had not climbed it yet. Come to think of it, she might have said that she had a friend who was guiding there. I cannot recall exactly. I was in pretty bad shape. On the way down, I ran out of juice completely. I had forgotten to eat and drink almost completely, only consuming 200 calories in solids and 100 calories of Powerade. Very bad. On the way down, I realized what I had done, but was generally too lethargic to grab the food and drink in my backpack. About 30 minutes from the bottom, I think Miriam and a female friend passed me.


Haha sounds like my Whitney trip. If you saw Sofia on the mountain it would not have been for long. She is gnarly. I call her the energizer bunny. She just keeps going and doesn’t seem to get winded or tired. I can out run and out climb her but when we hiked she just cruises when I’m dying. I’m actually pretty stoked to get to orizaba. The pictures and trip reports from there look amazing. I really want to see the shadow in person. I was super bummed when she said she was going on these dates and I couldn’t go.
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[*] posted on 2-21-2018 at 10:25 AM


It was [edited from "wasn't"] actually one the more miserable climbs that I've done. Conditions were bad. Cold, windy, dusty, and no snow. Lots of sand and gravel is hard to climb on.

[Edited on 2-22-2018 by BigBearRider]
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 01:09 AM


Quote: Originally posted by LukeJobbins  
Also wanted to give an update on Sierra Pedro de martir. I went up solo on Thursday and got denied entrance into the park as a whole. Apparently an American wanted to hike to blue bottle peak solo and was denied a permit so he said he would just camp and not do the hike and he went anyways. Well he got caught the rangers got in trouble for not monitoring the park enough and now the rangers are denying solo entry into the park. If you are part of a group or caravan type deal it is fine, but they are not allowing people to be in the park solo. I emailed the regional national park office in Ensenada to inquire about getting around the rule because I have been probably about 20 times solo and I have tons of gps routes and experience in the park and some survival training. They wrote me back saying this is not a new rule but it is new that they will be enforcing the no solo travelers rule from here on out. Outside of the park like picacho del Diablo they don’t care. And knowing some people and a few of the rangers I may be able to skirt around this rule from time to time but this is just a heads up for anyone in the future. No solo entry to the park. I was/am pretty bummed about it because I do almost all my trips and exploring solo and that eliminates a lot of planned trips down there this year for me.
Well that is a fine, "How do you do!" Well, it was fun while it lasted. So, so, so, solo, so long San Pedro Martir Parque. If it ain't one thing, it's another.
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John Harper
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 08:47 AM


Considering the limited federal resources in Baja, it kind of makes sense to at least require a "buddy" system for exploring the park. You wouldn't scuba dive without a buddy, so this is a small step for safety IMO. SAR efforts are very expensive in the US, can you imagine what it would cost to get someone out of SPM? See below.

Of course, this is another example of a few bad actors ruining it for everyone.

Here's a little story for all of you about an emergency in SPM back in the 1980's, probably not a lot has changed except communications equipment:
https://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/1986/nov/06/cover-snakeb...

John



[Edited on 2-22-2018 by John Harper]
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 11:57 AM


An excellent book about climbing and rescue off Diablo mountain is "Coming Home from Devil Mountain" by Eleanor Dart O'Bryon.
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 03:00 PM


Been years since I climbed Diablo. Do it like I did from the East. No rangers. No fees. Its a little tricky to find the route solo due to missing the ducks. All in all it just takes a little more time to do the route finding. It starts out with a pendulum swing followed by a modest friction climb. Then all the rest is easy. Up the canyon to Campo Noche then the rest is the same as from the west.
Trail head parking can be an issue because of local holiday users.
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 06:13 PM


Quote: Originally posted by PaulW  
Been years since I climbed Diablo. Do it like I did from the East. No rangers. No fees. Its a little tricky to find the route solo due to missing the ducks. All in all it just takes a little more time to do the route finding. It starts out with a pendulum swing followed by a modest friction climb. Then all the rest is easy. Up the canyon to Campo Noche then the rest is the same as from the west.
Trail head parking can be an issue because of local holiday users.
I agree, Paul. The eastern route gives you a great canyon hike experience. Also, a fairly simple straight, forward route basically following the creek that runs down the canyon. One should prepare for a round-trip hike of about 6 to 8 days if you intend to climb Picacho. That should allow enough time in case you have to slow down for some reason. I've yet to summit Picacho, but I have made several trips up Diablo Canyon and if I ever make another attempt to summit Picacho, I won't hesitate to take the eastern desert route.
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 06:43 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Desert Rat  
Quote: Originally posted by PaulW  
Been years since I climbed Diablo. Do it like I did from the East. No rangers. No fees. Its a little tricky to find the route solo due to missing the ducks. All in all it just takes a little more time to do the route finding. It starts out with a pendulum swing followed by a modest friction climb. Then all the rest is easy. Up the canyon to Campo Noche then the rest is the same as from the west.
Trail head parking can be an issue because of local holiday users.
I agree, Paul. The eastern route gives you a great canyon hike experience. Also, a fairly simple straight, forward route basically following the creek that runs down the canyon. One should prepare for a round-trip hike of about 6 to 8 days if you intend to climb Picacho. That should allow enough time in case you have to slow down for some reason. I've yet to summit Picacho, but I have made several trips up Diablo Canyon and if I ever make another attempt to summit Picacho, I won't hesitate to take the eastern desert route.


You are 'da man from the east (side of Diablo)!






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Desert Rat
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[*] posted on 2-22-2018 at 11:56 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by Desert Rat  
Quote: Originally posted by PaulW  
Been years since I climbed Diablo. Do it like I did from the East. No rangers. No fees. Its a little tricky to find the route solo due to missing the ducks. All in all it just takes a little more time to do the route finding. It starts out with a pendulum swing followed by a modest friction climb. Then all the rest is easy. Up the canyon to Campo Noche then the rest is the same as from the west.
Trail head parking can be an issue because of local holiday users.
I agree, Paul. The eastern route gives you a great canyon hike experience. Also, a fairly simple straight, forward route basically following the creek that runs down the canyon. One should prepare for a round-trip hike of about 6 to 8 days if you intend to climb Picacho. That should allow enough time in case you have to slow down for some reason. I've yet to summit Picacho, but I have made several trips up Diablo Canyon and if I ever make another attempt to summit Picacho, I won't hesitate to take the eastern desert route.


You are 'da man from the east (side of Diablo)!



Hi, David. This photo was taken at the entrance falls to the canyon. The pendulum swing is located across from me, but does not appear in the photo. This is a great place to swim after returning from the canyon hike.

[Edited on 2-23-2018 by Desert Rat]
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PaulW
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[*] posted on 2-23-2018 at 08:34 AM


DesertRat,
You probably remember these images from a while back. I dug them up from Photobucket for this thread.

This is my daughter on the pendulum with me standing by to coach her.


And here is my wife directing traffic for daughter and husband on the second hard place. The ladder is gone and the last time I went up all that was there was the steel cable to use as a hand hold. On my first climb of Diablo nothing was present on that wall, so it was a difficult friction climb that required some ability and really good boots.


The next place to mention is a short section of bush whacking that took a little time to pass.

Good times on this route.
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David K
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[*] posted on 2-23-2018 at 09:47 AM


Thanks Paul for the photos. Really helps visualize the "trail"!



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

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