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Author: Subject: Sea of Coetez minerals?
Don Jorge
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 06:40 AM
Sea of Coetez minerals?


Sea Agri Inc is evaporating Sea of Cortez water and producing a granular mineral product for use in agriculture as well as producing table salts.

https://seaagri.com/

We are using their SEA-90 granular product as part of our program to remineralize our pastures.

My question: Does anyone know where this company Sea Agri Inc has their evaporation ponds in Baja?




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AKgringo
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 06:59 AM


Interesting article! Baja is only half of the Sea of Cortez coastline, and I imagine that the cost of operating the facility might be lower on the mainland.



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BajaUtah
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 07:19 AM


A few videos on Youtube gave me a clue

From Google Earth, about 14 miles north of San Felipe is what I'd guess. Looks like some big retention ponds.




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Don Jorge
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 07:25 AM


Spoke with company rep. Their evaporation ponds are located north of San Felipe. Makes sense as the northern Sea of Cortez is high in minerals, has huge tidal swings and is close to the border.

They make culinary salts also.
https://bajagoldseasalt.com/



[Edited on 5-7-2018 by Don Jorge]




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wilderone
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 07:53 AM


Here are some hints: Note they tout the estuary as pristine and pollution-free. Their production photos show the area all torn up with algae bloom on the ponds, evidently with additional ponds being made. Used to be pristine.

"The work is done entirely by nature's natural forces. Tidal action moves sea water inland eight miles (12.87 Km) three times each year. Our estuary is one foot (30 cm) below sea level. We created enormous retention ponds in the estuary that fill with approximately six inches (15 cm) of mineral rich sea water. Once trapped, the water is naturally dehydrated by the sun.
SEA-90 marine mineral solids created in this specific location are unique in their mineral and trace element density due to five major factors:
SEA-90 is created from a sea enriched with billions of tons of top soil deposited by a powerful river into its delta for millions of years.

Mineral rich Pacific Ocean water with its 85 known elements blends with our sea water to add even more mineral balance.

Rare earth elements (PDF) are added to this sea water mix from geothermal vents along a fault line on the sea bottom.

The location’s climate has average temperatures exceeding 100° F (37° C) and less than one-half inch (1.25 cm) annual rainfall guaranteeing quick solar dehydration and a complete mineral package since no elements are leached away.

And increasingly important, the area is extremely remote and remains pollution free."
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 08:12 AM


Quote: Originally posted by wilderone  
Here are some hints: Note they tout the estuary as pristine and pollution-free. Their production photos show the area all torn up with algae bloom on the ponds, evidently with additional ponds being made. Used to be pristine.


yes, the area is probably torn up to make/maintain the ponds.
the algae is normal to all seawater evaporation facilities.
the low salinity ponds will have green algae.
the higher salinity ponds have a particular algae that is red.
some ponds may be orange from brine shrimp (for example, you'll see orange of brine shrimp when you land in bay area and fly over the Cargill ponds)




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PaulW
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 08:40 AM


Quote: Originally posted by BajaUtah  
A few videos on Youtube gave me a clue

From Google Earth, about 14 miles north of San Felipe is what I'd guess. Looks like some big retention ponds.

===== =
The only area of drying ponds north of San Felipe can be seen in the image below. There are several businesses at that location, including smaller one that sells ground up table salt. The largest facility is booming now that hot weather has arrived. Last month they had 3 truck loading stations and uncounted front end loaders pushing the salt into big berms. In winter the site gets down to one loading station. We interviewed the manager/owner of the large facility and he explained most all of his salt is distributed by others for agriculture use. The source of salt water for the ponds comes from the sea of Cortez when the demand is high and the tide is high. Otherwise - like winter, they have diesel powered wells nearby. On my various trips to the place I have never seen the salt water being pumped into the ponds, but lots of activity always going on. I always see loaded and empty large trucks waiting or ready to depart. The salt is bagged into big cotton bags and neatly stacked onto the flat bed trailers. All the processing is done in Mexicali where the owner has another facility to process the salt into the buyers specs. The product leaving this facility has the composition of granules 1/8-1/4" or bigger and needs further processing.
This facility is a 3rd generation family deal and involves owned land as well as land leased from the government. Rest assured this is a small operation compared to what you all know about on the pacific coast.

Salt.jpg - 177kB
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BajaUtah
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:06 AM


The one I saw was a bit closer to SF and looks like drying ponds but I think PaulW might be right as the video's description of being farther "inland" fits his spot




[Edited on 5-7-2018 by BajaNomad]




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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:15 AM


I do not know what company owns the ones by Punta Arena de la Ventana but there are lots of ponds there...



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PaulW
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:18 AM


Shrimp Farm Location
(no access to prevent possible contamination)


Shrimp Farm.jpg - 139kB
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:23 AM


the northern Sea of Cortes is the dirtiest. US and Mexicali agricultural runoff and the accumulated trash of the Colorado River. Yikes! The water is probably also contaminated with microfibers. Many restaurants are going back to stone salt, because it is pristine.
The Salina on Isla San Jose is possibly clean.




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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:26 AM


BajaUtah please fix or delete your last picture
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PaulW
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:30 AM


Quote: Originally posted by 4x4abc  
the northern Sea of Cortes is the dirtiest. US and Mexicali agricultural runoff and the accumulated trash of the Colorado River. Yikes! The water is probably also contaminated with microfibers. Many restaurants are going back to stone salt, because it is pristine.
The Salina on Isla San Jose is possibly clean.

======= =
Yup, we do not buy the sea salt from "San Felipe Salt" because its source is at the place I referred to in my long winded post above. Beside the ag salt place.
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David K
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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:31 AM


Quote: Originally posted by PaulW  
BajaUtah please fix or delete your last picture

It is just an example of over-sized for Nomad. If he can edit into the first tag [IMG] or [img], (after the IMG) =800x600 so it is [img=800x600] it fixes it!

Edit: Doug resized it.

[Edited on 5-7-2018 by David K]




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[*] posted on 5-7-2018 at 09:55 AM


https://www.facebook.com/ScienceNaturePage/videos/1308343825...



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