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Author: Subject: Is Mexico as safe as it used to be?
Paco Facullo
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[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 07:59 PM


Busted !!! Guilty as charged .....................



Since I've given up all hope, I feel much better
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BajaTed
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[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 08:09 PM


Not being on your "home" turf is a universal issue not isolated to Baja.
Universal also is; the dumbest & weakest appearing will be tested further and possibly targeted.
It doesn't come out of the clear blue sky either, there will be signs




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[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 08:18 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Paco Facullo  
Someone that cycles on Hwy 1 should realize the danger they put themselves and others in by biking on such a narrow highway .


You cagers should realize the danger you put others in by driving too fast to accomodate bicycles that have same rights to road as you!




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Paco Facullo
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[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 08:32 PM


Rights ?

Rights be DAMMED !!!

Out on the highway it's you and you alone .................................

On either side of the coin............

To clarify, you can be 100% right and still find yourself maimed or dead...
So be careful out there folks .

[Edited on 5-13-2018 by Paco Facullo]




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Paco Facullo
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[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 08:36 PM


And why would you assume I'm driving too fast ?????

I've never been called a " Cager" before ? That's a first......
But I an looking forward to it sum fine dasy ................

[Edited on 5-12-2018 by Paco Facullo]




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rts551
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 01:46 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
More people are robbed and killed here in California in a day than in a year or more in Baja.


To put it in perspective the state of CA has 40 million people. Baja and Baja Sur have 4 million. Also it is probable that reporting of crimes in Mexico is not as high as in the U.S. To be clear I'm not saying which is worse but there are places I would not go to on both sides.


Yes, but don't you think an American is far far more likley to meet with a criminal in America where he lives most of the time than the week or two of the year in Baja where he camps? I feel safer in Baja camping than anywhere in the U.S. outside my home.

Sorry if my logic wasn't described clearly before. Just talking around the Nomad campfire. Toss in another magic rock, please!


not everyone is a weekender in Baja.
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chippy
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 02:41 PM


Quote: Originally posted by rts551  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
More people are robbed and killed here in California in a day than in a year or more in Baja.


To put it in perspective the state of CA has 40 million people. Baja and Baja Sur have 4 million. Also it is probable that reporting of crimes in Mexico is not as high as in the U.S. To be clear I'm not saying which is worse but there are places I would not go to on both sides.


Yes, but don't you think an American is far far more likley to meet with a criminal in America where he lives most of the time than the week or two of the year in Baja where he camps? I feel safer in Baja camping than anywhere in the U.S. outside my home.

Sorry if my logic wasn't described clearly before. Just talking around the Nomad campfire. Toss in another magic rock, please!


not everyone is a weekender in Baja.





Thats what dk doesn´t get. He is a quick strike hit and run Baja guy. A couple a days here and a couple of days there then scurry home. Nothing wrong with that but his logic doesn´t work for people posting up for mos. at a time or with permanent places.
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del mar
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 03:02 PM


Quote: Originally posted by chippy  
Quote: Originally posted by rts551  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by TMW  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
More people are robbed and killed here in California in a day than in a year or more in Baja.


To put it in perspective the state of CA has 40 million people. Baja and Baja Sur have 4 million. Also it is probable that reporting of crimes in Mexico is not as high as in the U.S. To be clear I'm not saying which is worse but there are places I would not go to on both sides.


Yes, but don't you think an American is far far more likley to meet with a criminal in America where he lives most of the time than the week or two of the year in Baja where he camps? I feel safer in Baja camping than anywhere in the U.S. outside my home.

Sorry if my logic wasn't described clearly before. Just talking around the Nomad campfire. Toss in another magic rock, please!


not everyone is a weekender in Baja.





Thats what dk doesn´t get. He is a quick strike hit and run Baja guy. A couple a days here and a couple of days there then scurry home. Nothing wrong with that but his logic doesn´t work for people posting up for mos. at a time or with permanent places.


wouldn't you think someone THAT fanatic would live here????




funny how drinking 8 glasses of water a day seems impossible but 8 beers and 7 shots in 2 hours go down like a fat kid on a seesaw
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chippy
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 03:53 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Seems what we have here is a failure to communicate.
My comments regarding the safety of Americans on vacation in Mexico are consistent. Americans can be safer in Mexico on a vacation than the rest of the year in America.
My comments both are supportive of the locals who depend on tourism, and of Americans who want a Baja experience.
I know a few of you think that since you found Baja, that nobody else should.
Sorry!


More flawed logic. My parents had various places in baja since I was 8 years old (62 now). My brother has a place south of San Felipe since the 70s. I still do Baja occasionally but have been residing in mainland Mexico for the last 20 years. I´m not trying to keep Baja for myself. I don´t want it. I´m also not constantly trying to sell it as you do. Your rose colored lenses are that of a weekend tourist with no base in reality.



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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 03:59 PM


David I don't disagree with what you are saying, I too think Baja is generally safe.

I've camped in Baja and the U.S. alone and with others many times and I have not had any problems on either side. I go to many places on both sides and I've never had any problems with bad guys except when my truck was stolen at Rene's restaurant in Rosarito and that was 25 years ago. That said I go thru the border and don't stop especially in TJ and I never cross the border at night if I can help it. I don't drive at night if I can help it on either side.

A big difference between the U.S. and Mexico is guns. I know a lot of people that carry a gun and if necessary the bad guy could regret messing with them. In Mexico the bad guys have the guns and that gives them the advantage.
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 06:28 PM


You just reinforced what I said. 8 trips 2 mos. What don´t you understand about being a weekend warrior? Pretending I know you? Your ego knows no bounds.
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 06:40 PM
Let the bike pass


You do not have to kill the cyclists with your car. let them pass and the heroin junkies will get them down the road a ways.

Los Angles Times
http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-mexico-cyclists-20180511-...

A pair of European cyclists who disappeared in southern Mexico last month and whose remains later turned up in a rural ravine were victims of an armed robbery and not an accident, a Mexican prosecutor said Friday.

One cyclist was shot in the head and his companion likely died from a head wound caused by a beating, Luis Alberto Sanchez, the chief homicide prosecutor in Mexico's Chiapas state, told the Mexican media.

Last week, a different state prosecutor had said there was no indication of foul play in the high-profile disappearance.

The case of the missing cyclists — Holger Franz Hagenbusch, a German national, 43, and his Polish traveling companion, Krzysztof Chmielewski-Podroznik, 37 — has reverberated for weeks on social media and in the European and Mexican press.

Mexico has seen a spike in murders and other crime that has almost exclusively victimized Mexican citizens and does not appear to have had a major effect on the nation's multibillion-dollar tourism industry. Officials in Chiapas vowed to increase security along highways in the wake of the cyclists' killings.

The bearded Hagenbusch — pictured in Facebook photos with a broad smile as he sipped soft drinks and listened to music in Mexico — was a veteran cyclist and adventurer who had pedaled through Asia, Europe and the United States before coming to Mexico, according to social media postings. He was planning a trip to Africa.

Last week, after authorities announced that the body of the Pole had been found, an assistant state prosecutor in Chiapas declared publicly that he had likely died in an accident. The narrow road on which the cyclists were riding featured a precipitous drop into the adjoining ravine, authorities said.

But Friday, Sanchez said the two cyclists were victims of an "assault," with robbery a likely motive.

"We have the loss of two human lives that looks to us like intentional homicide," Sanchez told Mexico's Televisa network.

A bicycle and photographic equipment were among the items missing from the scenes where the bodies were found, the prosecutor said.

The two bodies, badly decomposed, were discovered in a remote area along the winding highway between the cities of San Cristobal de las Casas and Ocosingo in Chiapas. Hagenbusch's remains were found May 4 about 200 yards down a ravine from the site where Chmielewski-Podroznik's body had been discovered April 26, authorities said.

According to media accounts here, a bus driver had reported seeing the two cyclists riding together on the San Cristobal-Ocosingo route April 20.

The German cyclist's brother, Rainer Hagenbusch, had issued a plea for help on Facebook in late April after not having heard from Holger in 11 days. Holger Hagenbusch had last been in touch from San Cristobal de las Casas, a colonial town popular with tourists.

On Thursday, Rainer Hagenbusch — who had traveled to Chiapas to identify his brother's body — said on Facebook that he had confirmed that his sibling had died from a gunshot wound to the head.

"Rest in Peace Holger," Rainer Hagenbusch wrote. "The whole world will miss you. You were something special."

On social media, commentators condemned the killings — many bemoaned an escalating lack of security in Mexico — and paid tribute to Hagenbusch's adventurous life. One YouTube video from a friend featured images of the late cyclist in Asia and Mexico, saying: "My heart is broken for you and for Mexico."

The two cyclists were reportedly headed to Ciudad del Carmen, on the Yucatan peninsula, some 300 miles to the north of San Cristobal de las Casas. En route, the pair apparently planned to visit the majestic, remote Mayan ruins of Palenque, a major tourist attraction.

The Mexican media have carried various accounts of assaults along the isolated roads between San Cristobal and Palenque.

Last year, seven assailants wearing ski masks and brandishing arms waylaid a bus carrying 28 Palenque-bound German tourists and robbed them of cash, jewelry and other valuables. None of the tourists were injured in the attack, the Mexican media reported.




the fat lady is breeding
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The fat ladys are breeding
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rts551
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 08:30 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Chippy, I spent two months during 8 different trips to Baja just in 2017. I don't go to the same place each time and my first trip without parents was in 1974 when I was 16. Enough pretending you know me.


A whole 2 months? WOW
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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 08:35 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by chippy  
You just reinforced what I said. 8 trips 2 mos. What don´t you understand about being a weekend warrior? Pretending I know you? Your ego knows no bounds.


7 trips were from 6 to 14 days long covering thousands of miles each (only one was a 3-day family beach weekend camping), just last year. Add the other 50+ years I have been going to Baja and I think I am quite qualified to have an opinion if camping and travel is safe in Baja.


Anyone can have an opinion....opinions are like.....

The point is you blow through an area and think you are an expert...not so... It takes time. Many that live here in Baja have a different opinion about crime and other things. Now...Is it the weekend warrior or the person that lives here that might have a better qualified opinion? David, open up to people who are more traveled than you are in Baja...if that is possible.

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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 09:54 PM


We always travel with 2 paid Mexican helpers/friends.

They keep the kids and me safe. Make the trips a lot more fun.




[Edited on 5-13-2018 by JZ]




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[*] posted on 5-12-2018 at 10:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by rts551  
Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Quote: Originally posted by chippy  
You just reinforced what I said. 8 trips 2 mos. What don´t you understand about being a weekend warrior? Pretending I know you? Your ego knows no bounds.


7 trips were from 6 to 14 days long covering thousands of miles each (only one was a 3-day family beach weekend camping), just last year. Add the other 50+ years I have been going to Baja and I think I am quite qualified to have an opinion if camping and travel is safe in Baja.


Anyone can have an opinion....opinions are like.....

The point is you blow through an area and think you are an expert...not so... It takes time. Many that live here in Baja have a different opinion about crime and other things. Now...Is it the weekend warrior or the person that lives here that might have a better qualified opinion? David, open up to people who are more traveled than you are in Baja...if that is possible.



come on ralph....you know trying to reason with a narcissist is like trying to nail jello to a tree...:rolleyes:

[Edited on 5-13-2018 by willardguy]
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[*] posted on 5-13-2018 at 09:22 AM


Puerto Vallarta is a ghost town.
Collateral damage from too many bodies.

Life in small town America is so bad that Mexican brown is the answer???
WTF happened on our watch baby boomers???







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[*] posted on 5-13-2018 at 09:37 AM


Quote: Originally posted by BajaTed  
Puerto Vallarta is a ghost town.
Collateral damage from too many bodies.

Life in small town America is so bad that Mexican brown is the answer???
WTF happened on our watch baby boomers???



Keep dreaming, and I bet the tourism numbers to Puerto Vallarta, in 2018 will also be very good.
___________________

Puerto Vallarta Tourism Pacing Another Record Year DESTINATION & TOURISM PATRICK CLARKE AUGUST 15, 2017

Puerto Vallarta and Mexico's tourism industry have set a blistering pace over the first half of 2017, the destination's tourism board announced Tuesday.

The resort city is currently on schedule to host a record number of visitors this year.

The Puerto Vallarta Tourism Board reported a more than six percent increase in hotel occupancy over the first six months of 2017. Puerto Vallarta also reported an occupancy rate of close to 90 percent for the months of January through June. For comparison, the city reported 73 percent occupancy in 2016 and 70 percent during 2015.

https://www.travelpulse.com/news/destinations/puerto-vallart...




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[*] posted on 5-13-2018 at 10:33 AM


Although touched on here there are several vast differences when comparing crime stats in both countries. The most major being that as most crimes are not only not reported here in Mexico and are rarely if ever solved. At least you can call a cop in the US and have some kind of legal recourse should he blow you off or shake you down. Willard is correct in that to truly understand what is occurring in an area you need to spend time there or have local connections. The turf wars here and elsewhere in Mexico are not going away and for sure the newly and not so newly repatriated are not looking to join the field workers here for employment. For sure this is not to say that police corruption does not occur in the US but it is not the standard as down here. Journalists in the US are not to the best of my knowledge routinely assassinated, kidnapped and murdered. Do I not camp? Absolutely I do. I travel with a protection trained Belgian Malinois and keep a 100# pit/mastiff at home in Ensenada. Some deterrent at least. It didn't keep em from stealing my car and tools out of a non attached garage a few years ago. Yeah, times they are a changing and if you don't change with them then roll the dice. I think and this is just my opinion that part of what many of us that live here and those that travel the remote portions of Baja love is the freedom to do so without a ranger or some other government entity deciding where we can go or when and how much it will cost or finally where to park. Less is much more and I gladly will take the risk and do to keep living in Baja. Hell don't tell me that we who live or come here on a regular basis like the road(s) more travelled. Buen Viajes y Vida Libre!
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[*] posted on 5-13-2018 at 01:10 PM


Quote: Originally posted by BajaTed  
Puerto Vallarta is a ghost town.
Collateral damage from too many bodies.

Life in small town America is so bad that Mexican brown is the answer???
WTF happened on our watch baby boomers???




Thats far from reality/truth. Have you been there lately? I was there 5 days ago. You would have thought semana santa was still happening. Frickin gridlocked/packed/zoo.
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