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pappy
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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 04:52 PM
Death while surfing


Word is a highly skilled and respected guy from the central coast of California just passed away while surfing in the central coast area of Baja. Apparently was out in the water sitting on his board when his heart gave out. Friends tried to revive him to no avail. Guy was fit too.

Feel terrible for his friends that were there and for his family...
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woody with a view
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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 04:54 PM


Poor bastard. We should all be so lucky!
No link to the details?





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fishbuck
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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 04:55 PM


Waves were pumping...



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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 04:55 PM


Sounds like checking out on the Paradise Stroke.

Kowabunga.... what a way to go.

DEP





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Paco Facullo
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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 05:23 PM


The final "paddle out" ...

He couldn't have hopped the leave this beautiful earth any better than the way and where he did......................





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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 06:27 PM


I agree its better than most ways to go but some poor bastard still got stuck cleaning up. Ni modo thats life/death!

[Edited on 5-27-2018 by chippy]
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pappy
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[*] posted on 5-26-2018 at 11:46 PM
Death while surfing


Word is a highly skilled and respected guy from the central coast of California just passed away while surfing in the central coast area of Baja. Apparently was out in the water sitting on his board when his heart gave out. Friends tried to revive him to no avail. Guy was fit too.

Feel terrible for his friends that were there and for his family...
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pappy
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[*] posted on 5-27-2018 at 05:27 AM


Yeah, going out doing what you love is probably the best way. In this situation I am concerned it’s going to be something of a nightmare getting body back to the states?
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[*] posted on 5-27-2018 at 07:56 AM


God rest his soul. I am not a surfer but an avid boater, when my time is up will hope for a similar outcome on my boat. My wishes are to be cremated. Last time I checked it cost about $2500 to have that done in the Loreto area. I understand it is very expensive to have remains transferred back to US. God Bless!
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[*] posted on 5-27-2018 at 08:14 AM


I want to die like my Granddad did, peacefully in his sleep, unlike all the other passengers in the car, screaming while driving over the cliff !!!!



[Edited on 5-29-2018 by Paco Facullo]




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Q87
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[*] posted on 5-27-2018 at 12:19 PM


What to do when a US citizen dies in Mexico

There are a significant number of United States citizens now living permanently or semi-permanently in Mexico. According to the last Mexican census in 2010, more than 738,000 people born in the US now reside in Mexico, and this is still an approximate figure, as it may not include many ex-pats who remain in Mexico without the proper paperwork. A closer estimation of the number of American expats living in Mexico is believed to be nearer to 2 million.

If a family member passes away in Mexico and the family wishes to bring the body back to the US for burial, it can be very distressing to have to deal with the Mexican authorities and the red-tape that can surround moving the deceased back from Mexico to the United States.

Although none of us really want to think about it, it really is something you should familiarize yourself with if you are an American living in Mexico, especially if you are a retiree, suffering ill-health or a medical tourist. It is always advisable to ensure you have repatriation insurance cover and to check what deductibles there are.

Funeral shipping for a body back to the United States can be expensive, international shipping usually costs around $3,000 - $4,000 USD and that does not include the airline shipping fee. This is the average professional fee for a funeral home to collect the body, prepare it for shipping, complete all the necessary consular documentation and escort the body to the airline. Airlines fees can vary significantly, but to ship a body can often cost more than a flight ticket, and you can expect a fee of between $800 - $1,200! So your total costs for getting the body back to the US could amount to $5,000 - $6,000 USD. Once your
Funeral shipping from Mexico to the US
loved one arrives back in the US, you then have all the expense of the funeral.

If you have resided in Mexico for some time, and/or if you speak fluent Spanish, you may have no concerns about approaching funeral homes and the Mexican authorities to co-ordinate arrangements. However, if your Spanish is not up to scratch, it can be extremely daunting to have to suddenly deal with this task.

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico and how they can help
The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City will assist families of Americans who die within its Consular District. This includes the Mexican states of Chiapas, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Estado de Mexico, Hidalgo, Michoacan, Morelos, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Tabasco, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, and the city of Tampico, Tamaulipas.
For all other states in Mexico, you would need to contact your nearest Consular Agency. A list of all Consular agencies is available at the bottom of this page.

Firstly, it is important to highlight here that the U.S. Embassy cannot arrange funeral services or shipping for you. What they can do is help you locate a funeral home to handle arrangements for you.

The next-of-kin is responsible for all financial costs related to a funeral in Mexico, or funeral shipping the body back to the United States. The U.S. Embassy may help you with understanding the legalities of conducting a funeral service in Mexico.

The Embassy may also help with notifying next-of-kin of the death within the family, advising on claiming the deceased’s remains and the collecting of personal effects.

Legal Requirements for claiming a loved ones body in Mexico
Mexican authorities often request identification documents not only for the deceased, but also for the next-of-kin who is collecting the body. Be prepared to provide passports, birth certificates or marriage certificates.

When a U.S. citizen dies in Mexico the U.S. Embassy or Consular Agent has to prepare a Report of Death from the local Mexican death certificate. This is required so that you can legally certify a death overseas and undertake any legal proceedings for estate or insurance back in the U.S.

The issuing of the death certificate
Similar to the United States, once someone has passed away, a physician must certify the death, identify the cause of the death and issue the preliminary death record, which is called a ‘Certificado de Defuncion’.

A local Civil Registry judge will use the certificado de defuncion to issue the official death certificate, known as the ‘Acta de Defuncion’. Once this is issued the funeral home can go ahead with a burial, cremation or arrange funeral shipping.

Time spans for arranging a burial, cremation or to ship a body back to the U.S.

In accordance with Mexican health authorities, a body should be buried, cremated or embalmed within 48 hours after the death. If you wish to bury or cremate your loved one either within 12 hours after death, or after 48 hours following death, then you will require a permit from the Mexican health authorities.

Arranging a Burial in Mexico

If you decide to inter your loved one in a grave in Mexico, be aware that the remains will only remain interred indefinitely if the gravesite has a perpetual deed. If you do not have this, remains are kept interred in the gravesite for a minimum of 6 years.

Arranging a Cremation in Mexico

Cremation is becoming increasingly popular in Mexico. If you wish to arrange a cremation in Mexico from the U.S., you can provide a power of attorney that allows the funeral home to complete the cremation permit on your behalf. This means that you can arrange the disposition of the remains whilst still in the United States, and then arrange for the ashes to be collected at a later date or sent home.

If the deceased is to be transported between states in Mexico for cremation, the body must be embalmed. If the body is to be transported over 100 km then a special transit permit is also required.

Is embalming required by law in Mexico?
Not if the body is to be buried or cremated within 48 hours. However, due to the high temperatures and often lack of adequate refrigeration, many opt to go ahead with embalming anyway. If you plan to transport the deceased back to the U.S. he/she must be embalmed.

What documentation do I need to repatriate the deceased to the U.S.?

To export human remains from Mexico to the U.S. you will require: the death certificate, the embalming certificate, details of the shipper and details of the final destination of the remains. The U.S. Embassy will issue a ‘Consular Mortuary Certificate’, which allows the remains to enter the United States.

Similarly if you wish to export the deceased’s ashes, you will need: the death certificate, the cremation permit and the cremation certificate from the crematorium or funeral home. Some airports may request the Consular Mortuary Certificate, and ashes can be transported in your hand luggage with most airlines.

Repatriation of Remains Insurance Plan
As we mentioned earlier in this article, if you are planning on traveling extensively in, or retiring to, Mexico or are visiting Mexico for some medical treatment, you would be well advised to ensure you do have the security and peace of mind of having an adequate repatriation insurance plan. This is a wise thing to have if you are residing temporarily in Mexico, and you can have a plan that can facilitate repatriation in the event of illness or accident, and repatriation of remains that facilitates the repatriation of your body in the event that you die in Mexico. A robust insurance plan will have a return of mortal remains benefit in addition to many other medical treatment benefits such as hospital room and board, out-patient care, maternity coverage and emergency room illness and accident coverage. Carefully go through any policy and ensure you are adequately covered.

Further Resources to assist you arrange a funeral or cremation in Mexico

Further information from the U.S. Department of State Travel website can be found here:
http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/emergencies/death/death_...

A directory of all Consulates and Consulate Agencies in Mexico can be found here:
http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/edirectory.html

A directory of English-speaking funeral homes in Mexico can be found here:
http://photos.state.gov/libraries/mexico/531436/consular/Fun...

Funerals homes cover the following states and main cities in Mexico:

Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Los Cabos, La Paz, Loreto, Campeche, Campeche, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Colima, Manzanillo, Distrito Federal, Durango, Estado de México (Mexico State), Guanajuato, Leon, San Miguel de Allende, Guerrero, Acapulco, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Puerto Vallarta, Guadalajara, Michoacán, Morelia, Morelos, Nayarit, Nuevo León, Oaxaca, Huatulco, Oaxaca City, Puerto Escondido, Puebla, Querétaro, Quintana Roo, Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Yucatán, Merida, Zacatecas

The above info was from this site.
http://www.us-funerals.com/funeral-articles/what-to-do-when-...
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[*] posted on 5-27-2018 at 01:11 PM




'Till Death Do Us Part

By Fred Hoctor
The following is an excerpt from the book Baja Haha which, although a popular book among many veteran Baja travelers, seems not to have yet been discovered by the latest aficionados of the peninsula.


The American retirement communities in Baja fairly burst with dingbats who march to different drummers.

Mr. Dimmick is one. He's a guy who always seems to be in some kind of difficulty.

Dimmick -- "The first name's Theophilus, but (self-conscious chuckle) you can call me Ted" -- is a tall, skinny, disaster-prone nebbish who always has a story about his latest Baja "troubles," usually told in a monotone with sad resigned eyes and along reflective pauses. He has taken to plastering his sparse strands of dyed-black hair down on his dome with some kind of goo, though I remember his when his follicles were more bountiful. This, combines with his excessive Adam's apple, his paucity of flesh and a certain rolling gait, gives him the appearance of a semi-bald Ichabod Crane.

The way Dimmick explained one of his mishaps to me was this: His wife had invited her mother, a lady of some 80 summers, to visit the Dimmicks' Baja home for a week. After a rough trip down from Los Angeles, the old woman was feeling puny for the first few days, and even worse after that.

In fact, she had a massive heart attack and died.

Now, if you're a gringo (or, in this case, a gringa) you don't want to die in Baja.

The paperwork is all in triplicate.

It is altogether a very sticky business.

Mr. Dimmick, being a Baja resident for some years, knew all about that, which is probably why he did what he did. He simply neglected to tell anyone in Mexican officialdom about the demise of the old girl. Instead, he very carefully placed the body in a large green sleeping bag, zipped it up, and strapped the whole shebang to the top of his station wagon.

The problem, now, was to get the body through U.S. Customs. Dimmick's wife stayed home, too upset to argue about his unconventional modus operandi.

Dimmick pulled up to the Customs gate with a smile. Over the years he had learned that a smile was the best weapon to use in the border war.

It worked.

A young officer with curly blond hair and fuzzy cheeks peered briefly under a front fender, kicked a tire, and merely grunted at the lumpy green bag on the roof. On the OK-to-pass signal, Dimmick took off so fast he nearly whiplashed himself.

He buzzed up the freeway till he came to the big shopping center in San Ysidro, where he planned to call a mortician friend and tell him about the silent passenger above decks. Dimmick was upset, naturally. The worry of the border crossing was past, but he was still somewhat shaken by the whole experience, and he cursed under his breath as he cruised around the Safeway parking lot without finding an empty parking space.

Finally, after he had made three turns through the lot, a little blue Volkswagen eased out of a slot just eight spaces from the public pay phone. Dimmick pulled into the space slowly, so as not to further jar the body, took a small book of addresses and phone numbers from his breast pocket and jingled the coins he had carefully loaded in the little zipper-pocket on his jacket. Always a stickler for detail, his planning so far had been perfect. He had even brought along an extra can of gasoline so he would not have to stop at a station where some nosy attendant might start asking about the supercargo.

Then, just as he was about to head toward the empty phone booth, a large Mexican woman, dragging a cranky child, jammed herself and her kid into the booth, puffing to get the door shut.

Dimmick sat silently in the front seat, drumming his fingers against the face of his Bulova. He had come this far, he could wait another few minutes. He watched with irritation as the fat woman gesticulated while talking, nearly punching her fist through the glass panel behind the phone.

She talked for 25 minutes, and as she emerged, pushing the squealing child ahead of her, Dimmick sprinted toward the booth.

He rummaged for the change, set the nickels, dimes and quarters in neat stacks on the little steel shelf, and prepared to call the mortician's number.

As Dimmick's bony finger pushed the buttons, a young man wearing a fringed buckskin coat, leaning against an electric rocking horse in front of the market, stared intently at him.

The boy had a sallow complexion and a drooping left eye. Dimmick would remember that later when making out the police report.

Slowly the boy sauntered over to the station wagon. Then he jumped in and drove away.

Just drove away.

That was three years ago.

The police have never found the station wagon or Mr. Dimmick's mother-in-law.

Fred Hoctor





David
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John Harper
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[*] posted on 5-27-2018 at 02:45 PM


An acquaintance died on his board here in Encinitas a few years ago. I guess he was not feeling well for a few days before he went out. Heart attack as well.

John
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[*] posted on 5-28-2018 at 09:57 AM


Yeah I was wondering about what the options requirements are. I also thought of what if just stick the body in a sleeping bag and kinda bury it under all the camp gear in back of truck...if caught I imagine the consequences would be worse than just doing things the right way....
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[*] posted on 5-28-2018 at 10:25 AM


I'm wondering why there is all this concern about getting the corpse back to the United States. Why not have it buried/cremated in Mexico?

An American embassy/consulate can issue an American death certificate given the Mexican death certificate.

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-tra...




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[*] posted on 5-28-2018 at 10:39 AM


"I would rather die while I'm living than live while I'm dead"


Jimmy Buffet - Growing Old But Not Up




Believing is religion - Knowing is science

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[*] posted on 5-29-2018 at 09:28 AM


I remembered Hoctor's story before I scrolled down to your post...funny!!
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[*] posted on 5-29-2018 at 11:55 AM


im sorry but this never happened...
its a dream of all hardcore surfers

one guy died on the road while traveling
one guy died at his tennis club in California
another at home


no one died on his board




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woody with a view
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[*] posted on 5-29-2018 at 05:30 PM


Yeah, he was technically still alive when he keeled over and sunk. Wow!



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[*] posted on 5-29-2018 at 06:05 PM


There's advantages and disadvantages to dying quick vs slow.

Quick, No suffering but you don't have time to get your affairs in order.

Slow death, you get the aforementioned affairs in order, you can say your good by's, you can finish up your bucket list, etc.....

Personally I would rather know it was coming ...

And you ?????




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