BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  
Author: Subject: Come along on a visit to Rancho La Chinga & Mision Sta.Gertrudis
shari
Platinum Nomad
********


Avatar


Posts: 12423
Registered: 3-10-2006
Location: bahia asuncion, baja sur
Member Is Offline

Mood: there is no reality except the one contained within us "Herman Hesse"

[*] posted on 6-6-2018 at 07:37 PM
Come along on a visit to Rancho La Chinga & Mision Sta.Gertrudis


https://vimeo.com/273358962

Last week, the amazing guide Zihul Martinez from Guerrero Negro, took us to his compadres ranch where they are preparing for the family's future by creating an adventure tourism program where people can stay at the ranch and see more of what the area has to offer in natural history and nature photography of bighorn sheep.



The road from just north of Vizcaino was pretty good and passes through some outstanding cactus forests of huge old growth cardons some nearly a century old. It took us over an hour to get to the ranch and we stopped for a visit to Miraflores so Zihul could talk to the rancher there about the radio towers he sets up for the ranchers.



I was impressed by all the stone corrals and the rancher told us that they were completely covered by sand that was brought down the arroyo in Hurricaine Odile and they had to dig them all out by hand and shovel!!! And I wine about my roses getting beaten up!



We were welcomed warmly by 3 generations of Medinas and enjoyed some cold cervezas in the shade of the mesquite tree where the owners Don Kiko & his wife Mati told us about the history of the ranch & their plans for the future.









This was Mati's grandfathers adobe home that was abandoned when they grew old and storms decimated the area so families moved into towns and now the family is working hard to bring it back to life!



Hurricaine Odile also destroyed all the original 16th century grape vines that the missionaries planted but Mati managed to save some and they are doing well with new grapes on them. Her grandfather was the principal wine maker in the area and the family still makes wine the traditional way. That storm destroyed all the family gardens and arroyo and they are still moving rocks & degris 3 years later.



Something else buried by Odile was the famous Fertility Rock but the family dug it up and moved it to the ranch for safe keeping. It has helped many many women get pregnant so be careful if you sit on it!



On the adjacent mountainside beside the ranch you can see bighorn sheep especially in the winter when they come down the mountain as well as deer and we saw a beautiful fox!



It is a short stroll to the Mission where Zihul told us countless stories about the area, history and artifacts... we learned so much from him.



This big hollowed out rock was for storing wine!



Zihul calls the Mission a living monument as the church is still used today for special events...his son was baptized here last year!



He stood under this wooden contraption and said they were the original speakers...he demonstrated how the round design amplified the voice of the person standing under it...super cool!!!





On the way back to the ranch we stopped at the "Oxxo" a tiny store for more beer and Juan was surprised to see the storekeeper was a diver from his village of San Roque who lived there in the old days. Baja is such a small place!



The ranch can accommodate campers at the moment with hopes of some cabins in the future. They have a dining area where they will prepare your food and nice bathrooms with flush toilets and hot showers....although the grandkids prefer this tub!



The Medina men are members of the fishing cooperativa in Guerrero Negro where we set up our remote whale camp this season...it is like they lead dual lives...the fishermen and ranchers. Chema & Eric were the captain & crew on whale watching boat in Laguna Ojo de Liebre...another way to diversify their income.



How did the ranch get it's name you may ask? When they were building the house and walls at the ranch, Don Kiko would wake up the boys early to go to work and say Vamos a la Chinga...meaning hard labour in this case...and the name stuck!



Here is a video of our day if you care to tag along and lots more photos!
https://vimeo.com/273358962

The Medina family are not only lovely hard working people but are very talented as well and have a musical group with their cousins.

Here is a funny little ditty Chema & Eric sang us at Whale Camp


So if you want to go visit, they would be glad to have you. Look for Chema Medina on Facebook or message me for his phone #.




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
TMW
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 9343
Registered: 9-1-2003
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-6-2018 at 08:19 PM


That is really cool, thanks.
View user's profile
Paco Facullo
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 687
Registered: 1-21-2017
Location: Here now
Member Is Offline

Mood: Abiding ..........

[*] posted on 6-6-2018 at 08:43 PM


Another fantastic gem you have brought to our attention Sheri, thanks...

SO much warmth and history along with new history in the making..

Beautiful photos and write up to boot !




Since I've given up all hope, I feel much better
View user's profile
ElCap
Nomad
**




Posts: 232
Registered: 1-22-2010
Location: Montara CA, or San Ignacio BCS
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-6-2018 at 08:55 PM


I can certainly attest to Zihul, Eric & Chema being wonderful and amazing people. And I think somewhere out there that there is a video of Shari singing along (translating?) a song by Eric out at the whale camp at Carros Viejos!
View user's profile
motoged
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 5160
Registered: 7-31-2006
Location: Kamloops, BC
Member Is Offline

Mood: Gettin' Better

[*] posted on 6-6-2018 at 10:56 PM


Shari,
Beautiful story and pics.

As said, thank you for taking us to another Baja gem.




Don't believe everything you think....
View user's profile
shari
Platinum Nomad
********


Avatar


Posts: 12423
Registered: 3-10-2006
Location: bahia asuncion, baja sur
Member Is Offline

Mood: there is no reality except the one contained within us "Herman Hesse"

[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 08:10 AM


so many things amaze me about this family...their joy, compassion & respect for others, natural talent, unity, open minds, hard work ethic, creativity and diversity.

Watching these guys sing their songs loudly standing in the bow of their panga in hip waders and then in their worn cowboy boots working in the vineyard...so at home in two totally different worlds.

They realize the fishery may not support them forever so are experimenting with whale watching and sportfishing tourism...can you spot a couple Nomads?




But their heart lies in the hills...on their grandfather's ranch...so they are building their future en La Chinga which has so much potential with the historical site Mission, bighorn sheep at their doorstep and the vineyard...not to mention their musical talent. There is nothing like listening to great live music under the mesquite tree.

The outdoor sink reminds me of them...it is a naturally carved out rock on an old cardon trunk but with new pvc plumbing to bring water from the arroyo! the symbiosis of old and the new...



Although I am an ocean person, I am really enjoying our forays to local ranches. I see a great opportunity for visitors to explore a new realm of old Baja and help struggling ranchers to supplement their income so they may keep and improve the land and stay on the ranches their families have loved for generations.



There is a growing interest in this rural, rustic ranch tourism that offers such rich experiences...the road winding through enormous old growth cactus, the old fashioned hospitality & fantastic homemade food, the rich stories they tell of history & the present, the peace & tranquility of an off grid ranch. Many have nearby Missions to explore and other historical sites like cave paintings.







Now that some are accessible by roads, it is opening up a new niche for Baja visitors. So on your net Baja adventure to your favorite beach why dont you plan a day or two at a local ranch!
Just ask around and you will find one that suits your style! Take a day trip, stay overnight or for the weekend or even an extended stay to really get into the ranch spirit!




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
JohnK
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 68
Registered: 3-11-2012
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 01:29 PM


Wonderful report, Shari. It's now on my list!
View user's profile
hermosok123
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 79
Registered: 12-11-2016
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 03:46 PM


That is some great information about a wonderful family so representative of just one of the things that we live or come to Baja for. Thank you
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53258
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 04:10 PM


Bad roads bring good people...

Thanks, Shari!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
SFandH
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 4751
Registered: 8-5-2011
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 04:30 PM


"Rancho La Chinga"

Really? Translate that for me.




Want to adopt a mellow Baja dog or cat? - https://www.facebook.com/bajaanimalsanctuary/
View user's profile
shari
Platinum Nomad
********


Avatar


Posts: 12423
Registered: 3-10-2006
Location: bahia asuncion, baja sur
Member Is Offline

Mood: there is no reality except the one contained within us "Herman Hesse"

[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 04:56 PM


La Chinga in this case means working your butt off....like anther day of hard work would be otro dia de la chinga. So when the family would be getting ready to go to work for the weekend on the ranch Don Kiko would say...Vamos a La Chinga....lets get to work...so it is kind of a joke that stuck as a name. They have spent year moving rocks and digging out from Odile...very backbreaking heavy work...es una chinga!




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
SFandH
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 4751
Registered: 8-5-2011
Member Is Online


[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 05:07 PM


It's a versatile word.



Want to adopt a mellow Baja dog or cat? - https://www.facebook.com/bajaanimalsanctuary/
View user's profile
woody with a view
PITA Nomad
********




Posts: 15773
Registered: 11-8-2004
Location: Looking at the Coronado Islands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Everchangin'

[*] posted on 6-7-2018 at 05:43 PM


What a great report. Such magic in those old places!



View user's profile
bajaric
Nomad
**




Posts: 118
Registered: 2-2-2015
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 06:24 AM


That is pretty neat that they apparently have some old Mission Grape vines. The Mission Grape was the main source of wine in California up until about 1890. It was replaced by other varietals that made better wine, though there are still a few people making sacramental wine out of it as well as a fortified wine called Angelica that was said to be a favorite of the Padres. I would like to get a cutting off those vines.
View user's profile
pacificobob
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 535
Registered: 4-23-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 06:35 AM


Quote: Originally posted by SFandH  
"Rancho La Chinga"

Really? Translate that for me.


usage of that word would be worthy of its own thread
View user's profile
shari
Platinum Nomad
********


Avatar


Posts: 12423
Registered: 3-10-2006
Location: bahia asuncion, baja sur
Member Is Offline

Mood: there is no reality except the one contained within us "Herman Hesse"

[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 07:45 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bajaric  
I would like to get a cutting off those vines.


me too but when Mati told me of the struggle to find the vines under the sand and get cuttings and replant them and how only a few survived...I didnt ask for a cutting...maybe next time!

I love the mission wines...they are like mead!



[Edited on 6-8-2018 by shari]




View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53258
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 08:24 AM


Once there was a bottle of San Ignacio mission wine image posted on Nomad...

Every mission village seems to claim their grape vines came from the old country... at least from the mainland.

The site of Santa Gertrudis was not discovered by the Jesuits until around 1747. Padre Consag began baptizing Indians there in 1751 for a future mission in the region. He initially called this location 'La Piedad.

The next mission north of San Ignacio was to be named 'Dolores del Norte' and that name appears on Jesuit lists and maps going back to 1744. This had caused many in modern times to believe there was a lost mission by that name north of San Ignacio (often placing it at the adobe visita ruins in San Pablo Canyon or the ruined rock walls at San Francisco de la Sierra).

When funding for a new mission and a priest became available, the new mission's name was made 'Santa Gertrudis' in honor of the wife of the benefactor, the Marqués de Villapuente. He had sponsored the mission of San José del Cabo, but when the Jesuits closed that mission in 1748, the funds became available for a new mission in the north.

Santa Gertrudis was officially founded by Padre Georg Retz on July 15, 1752. Padre Retz had arrived at San Ignacio in 1751 to train for the future post by learning the Cochimí language first.

The stone church at Santa Gertrudis seen today was built during the Dominican period (1773-1822) and was completed in 1796, replacing the adobe church there.

The missions have many stories to tell!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
shari
Platinum Nomad
********


Avatar


Posts: 12423
Registered: 3-10-2006
Location: bahia asuncion, baja sur
Member Is Offline

Mood: there is no reality except the one contained within us "Herman Hesse"

[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 09:21 AM


I understand when the missionaries were expelled, it was used as a cantina! David, do other missions have this "speaker" in them?







View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53258
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 09:51 AM


I don't recall seeing it elsewhere? This church was remodeled and modernized in 1997 with financial assistance from the salt mine company in Guerrero Negro.

The Jesuits were expelled and replaced by the Franciscans... who after 5 years happily gave Baja California mission duty to the Dominicans. The Independence of Mexico ended the original purpose of the missions and most Dominican padres left in 1822. A few remained and a few were added before most of the missions closed in 1840. Only Santo Tomás remained operating as a mission longer, to 1849. The last two Dominicans left La Paz for the mainland in 1855. This is all in my book.

Where it is located and the height above the floor would have me question if it had anything to do with sound amplification. The priest typically speaks from the altar, does he not?

The explanation of what it is, is in one of the books on missions (Baja California Missions--In the Footsteps of the Padres by David Burckhalter, 2013): a golden sun medallion with the central image of a crouching dog holding a flaming torch in its mouth. This traditional Dominican symbol represents the dream of Saint Dominic's mother before his birth (the coming of one who would light up the world).

[Edited on 6-8-2018 by David K]




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
bajaric
Nomad
**




Posts: 118
Registered: 2-2-2015
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-8-2018 at 10:11 AM


Here is a link that describes how the ancestry of Mission grapes was traced back to Spain by DNA analysis

https://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/Researchers...

Grapes need to be pruned every fall when they become dormant so that would be a good time to transplant some cuttings. Grape vines have a maximum life span of 100 years, so these must have been propagated from the original vines at some point if they are indeed descended from the grapes that were planted by the Missionaries.

A winery called Gypsy Canyon makes Angelica from 100 year old Mission Grape vines found in an abandoned vineyard near Santa Barbara. They sell those s for $175 per bottle!
View user's profile
 Pages:  1  

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright � 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group�






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262