BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3  ..  5
Author: Subject: Missions, just the FACTS, a project...
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

cool.gif posted on 6-8-2018 at 05:38 PM
Missions, just the FACTS, a project...


I am working on a new (3rd) edition of our 2012 book with co-author Max Kurillo. The Old Missions of Baja & Alta California, 1697-1834.

This book first was published in 2012 and had a revision the following year when we took new photos at Guadalupe among other edits.

The purpose of the book was to correctly include the missions in Baja California with those in Alta California, in the order they were founded, as they were all California missions and the two Californias were not separated politically until 1804 after most of the missions were established.

The book gave only some basic history of all 48 missions with several photos and lists to help display history as it actually happened. That book is out-of-print and we have received requests for it to be reissued.

That project inspired me to write my 2016 book, Baja California Land of Missions, which has much more detail and history but only of the missions in Baja California.

As with my other projects, I value the (serious) input of my Nomad friends.

So, possibly for the new book, which will be completely different from the 2012 edition...

Here is a basic summary of the Baja missions that may appear near the top of their pages in the new book... (the second number from El Rosario on is the position when included with the Alta California missions). This is just a worksheet and probably doesn't have much interest with most of you, so no worries:

Mission number and common name

Official name

Founding date

Founding Order

Founding priest(s)

Building dates or site status

Closing date




#1 Loreto

Nuestra Señora de Loreto Conchó

October 25, 1697

Jesuit

Padre Juan María de Salvatierra

Stone church constructed from 1740 to about 1750. New roof and bell tower added in 1955.

Closed in 1829



#2 San Javier

San Francisco Javier de Biaundo

November 1, 1699 (relocated 5 miles south in 1710)

Jesuit

Padre Francisco Pícolo

Stone church constructed from 1744 to 1758.

Closed in 1817



#3 Ligüí

San Juan Bautista de Ligüí (de Malibat)

November 1705

Jesuit

Padre Pedro de Ugarte

No ruins

Abandoned in 1721



#4 Mulegé

Santa Rosalía de Mulegé

November 1705

Jesuit

Padre Juan Basaldúa

Stone church constructed 1757 to 1766.

Closed in 1821.



#5 Comondú

San José de Comondú

1708 (relocated 22 miles south in 1736)

Jesuit

Padre Julián de Mayorga

Stone church constructed 1754 to 1760, demolished in 1936. A side chapel was preserved.

Closed in 1827.


#6 La Purísima

La Purísima Concepció de Caegomó

January 1, 1720

Jesuit

Padre Nicolás Tamaral

No church ruins, two crypts remain to mark the mission.

Closed in 1826.



#7 La Paz

Nuestra Señora del Pilar de la Paz

November 3, 1720 (relocated 50 miles south to Todos Santos in 1748, 1 mile south in 1825)

Jesuit

Padre Jaime Bravo, Padre Juan de Ugarte

No ruins remain at La Paz or the second site. Reconstructed, enlarged church at the third site.

Closed in 1840.


#8 Guadalupe

Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Huasinapí

December 12, 1720

Jesuit

Padre Everarado Helen

Ruins from the 1750s.

Closed in 1795.


#9 Los Dolores

Nuestra Señora de los Dolores (Apaté and Chillá)

August 2, 1721 (relocated 15 miles southwest in 1741 to La Pasión)

Jesuit

Padre Clemente Guillén

Ruins at both sites, with only rubble and foundation stones at second site.

Closed in 1768.


#10 Santiago

Santiago el Apóstol Aiñiní

1724 (relocated 2 miles south in 1736)

Jesuit

Padre Ignacio Nápoli

Modern church on second site.

Closed in 1795.


#11 San Ignacio

San Ignacio de Kadakaamán

January 20, 1728

Jesuit

Padre Juan Luyando

Stone church construction from 1761 to 1767 and again from 1779 to 1786.

Closed in 1840.


#12 San José del Cabo

San José del Cabo Añuití

April 8, 1730 (relocated 3 times)

Jesuit

Padre Nicolás Tamaral, Padre José de Echeverría

Modern church on final site.

Closed from 1748 to 1768 and finally in 1840.


#13 Santa Rosa (Todos Santos)

Santa Rosa de las Palmas

August 1733

Jesuit

Padre Sigusmundo Taraval

No ruins remain. Modern church and playground on the site.

Terminated in 1748 when the older mission at La Paz was relocated to here.


#14 San Luis Gonzaga

San Luis Gonzaga Chiriyaqui

July 14, 1737

Jesuit

Padre Lambert Hostell

Stone church constructed from 1753 to 1758

Closed on August 20, 1768 by the Spanish government.


#15 Santa Gertrudis

Santa Gertrudis

July 15, 1752

Jesuit

Padre Georg Retz

Stone church construction completed in 1796

Closed in 1822


#16 San Borja

San Francisco de Borja Adac

September 1, 1762

Jesuit

Padre Wenceslaus Linck

Adobe ruins from 1759-1773. Stone church constructed to 1801.

Closed in 1818


#17 Calamajué/ Santa María

Nuestra Señora de Columna/ Santa María de los Angeles

October 16, 1766 (relocated 30 miles northwest and renamed in May 1767)

Jesuit

Padre Victoriano Arnés, Padre Juan Diez

Adobe outlines at 1766 site. Adobe buildings at second site from 1768-1769.

Abandoned in 1774 or 1775.


#18 San Fernando

San Fernando de Velicatá

May 14, 1769

Franciscan

Padre Junípero Serra

Adobe ruins remaining date to the 1790s

Closed in 1822


#19/ #24 El Rosario

Nuestra Señora del Rosario de Viñadaco

July 24, 1774 (relocated 2 miles west in 1802)

Dominican

Padre Francisco Galistéo

Adobe ruins at both sites

Closed in 1822


#20/ #25 Santo Domingo

Santo Domingo

August 30, 1775 (relocated 2.5 miles east in 1798)

Dominican

PadreMiguel Hidalgo, Padre Manuel Garcia

Adobe ruins at second site.

Closed in 1822


#21/ #29 San Vicente

San Vicente Ferrer

August 27, 1780

Dominican

Padre Miguel Hidalgo, Padre Joaquín Valero

Adobe ruins

Closed in 1829


#22/ #32 San Miguel

San Miguel Arcángel

March 28, 1787 (moved 7 miles west in 1788 and north 8 miles in 1810, then back)

Dominican

Padre Luis Sales

Adobe ruins at the second site.

Abandoned in 1834


#23/ #34 Santo Tomás

Santo Tomás de Aquino

April 24, 1791 (moved 1 mile east in 1794 and 3 more miles east in 1799)

Dominican

Padre José Loriénte

Adobe ruins at final site.

Abandoned in 1849


#24/ #37 San Pedro Mártir

San Pedro Mártir de Verona

April 27, 1794 (relocated 7 miles south after just 3 months)

Dominican

Padre Caietano Pallás, Padre Pablo Grijálva, Padre José Loriénte

Stone footings at first site. Stone walls at second site.

Abandoned in 1811


#25/ #42 Santa Catalina

Santa Catalina Virgen y Mártir

November 12, 1797

Dominican

Padre José Loriénte, Padre Tomás Valdellón

Footing stones

Abandoned in 1839


#26/ #45 Descanso (not a Spanish mission)

El Descanso

1830 (near the 1810 moved San Miguel mission site)

Dominican

Padre Felix Caballero

Floor and footings exposed and protected next to the modern church.

Abandoned in 1834


#27/ #48 Guadalupe (not a Spanish mission)

Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe

July 25, 1834

Dominican

Padre Felix Caballero

Footings exposed

Abandoned in 1840.




[Edited on 7-30-2018 by David K]




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1293
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 07:56 AM


what I would like to see:
the number of Jesuits/soldiers (management) at each mission
the number of indians (workforce) at each mission
with an indication of minimum number and when
plus maximum number and when




Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Paco Facullo
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 683
Registered: 1-21-2017
Location: Here now
Member Is Offline

Mood: Abiding ..........

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 08:00 AM


Quote: Originally posted by 4x4abc  
what I would like to see:
the number of Jesuits/soldiers (management) at each mission
the number of indians (workforce) at each mission
with an indication of minimum number and when
plus maximum number and when
Did they keep such detailed information ???



Since I've given up all hope, I feel much better
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 10:23 AM


The number of Jesuits, with their names and what missions they served at is in my book, Harald. At the most, there were 16 Jesuits in California (Baja California) at the time of the expulsion. (page 30)

The number of Spanish soldiers was minimal and varied from 18 to 60 during the Jesuit period (up to 15 missions open). In the beginning, the Jesuits had to finance the entire occupation/conversion project. Later, they were able to get the government to pay the soldiers.

In 1717, the crown (royal government) agreed to support 25 soldiers... and the Jesuits would pay for a few more. Around 30 in 1734.

After the Pericú Revolt, ten soldiers were based at the missions of Santiago, San José del Cabo, and La Paz with a total of 60 now paid for by the king.... until the expulsion in 1768.

In addition to the few padres and the soldiers, craftsmen (masons) were brought across the gulf to create the stone churches. Sadly, there are few population details in the letters of the padres other than the number of baptisms.

I tried to include a lot of these details in my book as they do give a view back in time.

Harald, if you can get a copy of Harry Crosby's 1994 book, Antigua California, he goes into much detail on the soldiers and craftsmen that were mentioned by the Jesuits.





"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1293
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 11:18 AM


so, each mission would likely have only one Jesuit present?
Maybe a soldier or two?

what a lonely life




Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 12:11 PM


Exactly...
When the Franciscans arrived, only 16 came... one for each existing mission plus the reopened San José del Cabo mission.
When the Dominicans came in 1773 to replace the Franciscans in Baja, they had two per mission.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1293
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 02:12 PM


so why would they build that big effing highway?
The Camino Real




Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 05:00 PM


El Camino Real was the Jesuit's lines of communication and supply between not only their missions but the visitas and ports, too. It was a trail wide enough for horses, mules, and donkeys as there were no wagons nor could any navigate the cuestas (grades) along the Camino Real. The original mission road from Loreto to El Rosario, as it progressed north after the second mission was founded (1699-1774) is exposed on Google Earth at www.caminorealbaja.com




[Edited on 6-10-2018 by David K]




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1293
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 08:19 PM


why is it that the missions south (Ligüi, Dolores, Gonzaga, La Paz, Santiago, Todos Santos, San Jose del Cabo) did not get lines of communication and supply between them?
No Camino Real south of Loreto?




Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-9-2018 at 09:23 PM


Oh yes they did... all missions, as I said, were connected. The Loreto to San Diego trail gets all the attention and has more documentation, that's all.



"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-10-2018 at 08:49 AM


Harald, looking over the letters written by Padre Juan María Salvatierra I could glean some population figures...

In June 1698, the California colony had 22 Spaniards.

On July 9, 1699, Salvatierra wrote that the Loreto presidio consisted of 27 soldiers with more expected to arrive soon.

I found a population report for the number of non-native Californians in the year 1700, when there were only two missions...
March 1, 1700, from a letter by Padre Salvatierra:
66 persons: padres, soldiers, muleteers, Filipinos, Christian Indians from the mainland, two Spanish soldiers of fortune, besides women and children.

In a letter dated August 29, 1701, Salvatierra reports of being somewhat in danger because of only having 16 soldiers for protection as the others had to be dismissed for lack of money to pay them.






"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 06:55 AM


Harald, here are some more population figures for soldiers:

At the beginning of the 18th Century, there were 12 men and even less.
In 1712, there were 20 soldiers; in 1715 there were 23; and in 1717, 25.
Data is from 'Black Robes in Lower California' c1952.

From 1708-1719 there 5 missions open (Loreto, San Javier, Ligüí, Mulegé, Comondú) plus the Jesuits of the time also were calling the visitas of San Juan Londó and Dolores: missions. ['Dolores' was north of Loreto and not the site of the 1721 mission of Dolores to the south]




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
motoged
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 5159
Registered: 7-31-2006
Location: Kamloops, BC
Member Is Offline

Mood: Gettin' Better

[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 10:07 AM


David,
I don't see any info you posted here answering Harald's question about indigenous populations and their roles in catholic/christian imperialism.

Maybe a typo ?





Don't believe everything you think....
View user's profile
4x4abc
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1293
Registered: 4-24-2009
Location: La Paz, BCS
Member Is Offline

Mood: happy - always

[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 11:17 AM


so, Dolores north of Loreto is a lost mission?



Harald Pietschmann
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
DaliDali
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 772
Registered: 4-21-2010
Location: BCS
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 11:55 AM


Quote: Originally posted by motoged  
David,
I don't see any info you posted here answering Harald's question about indigenous populations and their roles in catholic/christian imperialism.

Maybe a typo ?



Ged.....no matter how hard one tries, you just can't get that toothpaste back in the tube....It is was it was....a slice of world history

What was the role of indigenous peoples in Canada when the "crown" and France swept in and over run them with their brand of Christian Imperialism?




LOCK HER UP.......NOW MORE THAN EVER
View user's profile
motoged
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 5159
Registered: 7-31-2006
Location: Kamloops, BC
Member Is Offline

Mood: Gettin' Better

[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 12:17 PM


Quote: Originally posted by DaliDali  
Quote: Originally posted by motoged  
David,
I don't see any info you posted here answering Harald's question about indigenous populations and their roles in catholic/christian imperialism.

Maybe a typo ?



Ged.....no matter how hard one tries, you just can't get that toothpaste back in the tube....It is was it was....a slice of world history

What was the role of indigenous peoples in Canada when the "crown" and France swept in and over run them with their brand of Christian Imperialism?


:lol: we are not talking about toothpaste for a start....:rolleyes:

The role of indigenous peoples in these situations is to die of disease, loss of their cultures, and becoming victims of slavery, ethnic oppression, physical, psychological and/or sexual abuse, and in Canada's case institutional (residential school/family break-ups) applications.

Still no comments re: indigenous numbers, etc re: this patch of missions .

This big trail mission thing seems to glorify the invaders and their impact on indigenous people....just sayin' .

Your attempt to divert the question with a Canadian reference doesn't really do much to weaken any questions about the inglorious history...other than to question where else has it occured.

Thanks for pointing that out.:light:




Don't believe everything you think....
View user's profile
DaliDali
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 772
Registered: 4-21-2010
Location: BCS
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 12:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by motoged  
Quote: Originally posted by DaliDali  
Quote: Originally posted by motoged  
David,
I don't see any info you posted here answering Harald's question about indigenous populations and their roles in catholic/christian imperialism.

Maybe a typo ?



Ged.....no matter how hard one tries, you just can't get that toothpaste back in the tube....It is was it was....a slice of world history

What was the role of indigenous peoples in Canada when the "crown" and France swept in and over run them with their brand of Christian Imperialism?


:lol: we are not talking about toothpaste for a start....:rolleyes:

The role of indigenous peoples in these situations is to die of disease, loss of their cultures, and becoming victims of slavery, ethnic oppression, physical, psychological and/or sexual abuse, and in Canada's case institutional (residential school/family break-ups) applications.

Still no comments re: indigenous numbers, etc re: this patch of missions .

This big trail mission thing seems to glorify the invaders and their impact on indigenous people....just sayin' .

Your attempt to divert the question with a Canadian reference doesn't really do much to weaken any questions about the inglorious history...other than to question where else has it occured.

Thanks for pointing that out.:light:


The CA question is relevant in that "invaders" did in fact, also invade CA...did they or did they not? Are you not the prodigy of these "crown" invaders?...after 250 years or so.....can you notate the feeling you have about all that?

It would seem your trying to lay blame where there is none.
Invaders invade.....that is what they did......even in what is now known as CA.
And all 250 odd years or so ago....

Do you STILL hold that grudge about CA invaders?

And STILL no notes, you told me you had to consult about CA immigration.





LOCK HER UP.......NOW MORE THAN EVER
View user's profile
TMW
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 9336
Registered: 9-1-2003
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 01:01 PM


I would have to do some digging but I seem to remember reading what the Indian population at various missions was (probably round numbers) when first started and what it was at the end.

In Edward W. Vernon's book "Las Misiones Antiguas", The Spanish Missions of Baja California, he has a section in the front on the Indians. He states that derived statistics indicate that the 30,000-40,000 aboriginals who occupied the Jesuits territories on the arrivial of the Europeans, shrank to fewer than 7,000, as shown by the census taken at the Jesuits' expulsion in 1768.

Further reading on the subject is provided by Dr. Michael Mathes who has published studies on the Indian population and also Robert H. Jackson, in the Spanish Borderlands Source Book.

[Edited on 6-22-2018 by TMW]
View user's profile
norte
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 902
Registered: 10-8-2008
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 01:25 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Harald, looking over the letters written by Padre Juan María Salvatierra I could glean some population figures...

In June 1698, the California colony had 22 Spaniards.

On July 9, 1699, Salvatierra wrote that the Loreto presidio consisted of 27 soldiers with more expected to arrive soon.

I found a population report for the number of non-native Californians in the year 1700, when there were only two missions...
March 1, 1700, from a letter by Padre Salvatierra:
66 persons: padres, soldiers, muleteers, Filipinos, Christian Indians from the mainland, two Spanish soldiers of fortune, besides women and children.

In a letter dated August 29, 1701, Salvatierra reports of being somewhat in danger because of only having 16 soldiers for protection as the others had to be dismissed for lack of money to pay them.




Where did you get these letters? and did you translate them?
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53245
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Online

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 6-22-2018 at 04:00 PM


Quote: Originally posted by motoged  
David,
I don't see any info you posted here answering Harald's question about indigenous populations and their roles in catholic/christian imperialism.

Maybe a typo ?



He asked several questions and I answered some, got sidetracked on them. I am easy to contact if you needed me to look up something I missed. I can only retrieve data if the missionaries documented it... by going through several books as no single book has all the answers... One purpose of my book was to condense lots of interesting facts into a single book.

I am not religious or a Catholic, so I am only seeing this as actions that happened, rather than choosing to ignore or promote past actions. In short, Spain wanted California (the peninsula or island) and the mission system was (at that time) the way Spain educated the natives to be productive Spanish citizens and not kill European or Mexican-born people in California.

I am re-reading 'Black Robes in Lower California' and as I find population figures, I will continue to share them with everyone. Other sources are Harry Crosby's 'Antigua California' as well as others including numerous letters from the missionaries that have been preserved and published. In my book is an extensive reference list giving nearly all of the books about the missions.




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
 Pages:  1    3  ..  5

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright � 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group�






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262