BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  3    5
Author: Subject: Baja Cactus El Rosario
wilderone
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3202
Registered: 2-9-2004
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-6-2018 at 08:17 AM


"this is an overnight stop, not a resort"
I do think this is true, but El Rosario could become a getaway destination in itself for a 2-day stay. There's the mission ruins, museum, La Lobera, restaurants. What would be an asset to the tourists (and citizens) is easy access to a beach. North of El Rosario (before the winding hills) I believe most of it is private property. There are some rutted, eroded dirt roads to a cliff, or a rock strewn arroyo - the beaches a bit out of reach. Then there's the road to Punta Baja - at the punta the fishing co-op boats, just south of there along the coast, the road appears OK, but dicey due to some erosion ditches and deep powder dirt; and cliffside destinations. Taking the turnoff to Punta Baja there is a road that goes about 3 miles to a nice beach, through some interesting geologic formations; I hiked this dirt "road" and there was deep sand in places; and last time I was in the area, access to this road was hindered due to a high dirt berm because of road grading - no place to even pull off the main road. The hike alone would be an attraction, but you'd need safe parking. A stay in town, with a day at the beach, maybe even some fishing opportunities would add some appeal to stay more than a night.

[Edited on 7-6-2018 by wilderone]
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 53640
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 7-6-2018 at 08:56 AM


Quote: Originally posted by wilderone  
"this is an overnight stop, not a resort"
I do think this is true, but El Rosario could become a getaway destination in itself for a 2-day stay. There's the mission ruins, museum, La Ventana, restaurants. What would be an asset to the tourists (and citizens) is easy access to a beach. North of El Rosario (before the winding hills) I believe most of it is private property. There are some rutted, eroded dirt roads to a cliff, or a rock strewn arroyo - the beaches a bit out of reach. Then there's the road to Punta Baja - at the punta the fishing co-op boats, just south of there along the coast, the road appears OK, but dicey due to some erosion ditches and deep powder dirt; and cliffside destinations. Taking the turnoff to Punta Baja there is a road that goes about 3 miles to a nice beach, through some interesting geologic formations; I hiked this dirt "road" and there was deep sand in places; and last time I was in the area, access to this road was hindered due to a high dirt berm because of road grading - no place to even pull off the main road. The hike alone would be an attraction, but you'd need safe parking. A stay in town, with a day at the beach, maybe even some fishing opportunities would add some appeal to stay more than a night.


I agree with Cindi that El Rosario has many attractions in all directions. This we learned back in 2005-2007 when Antonio (BajaCactus) hosted the annual Baja-Rosario Cultural Festivals on the birthday of the town (when the mission was founded in July 1774).

On my website self-guided tours page http://vivabaja.com/tours/ is this list of links to photos:

El Rosario Area

Missions, Museum, La Bocana, La Lobera
Cactus Garden and Sauzalito mine ruins
Petrified Forest & La Bocana Beach
El Camino Real near Km. 80
Las Pintas Fossil Grotto
Los Martires to El Socorro, cactus forests, petroglyphs found!
Mision San Fernando and petros '05
Mina de San Fernando (plus mission and petros in '00)
El Marmol & El Volcan
Agua Dulce historic spring (plus Baja Cactus Motel)
Mama Espinoza Museum & Search for Santa Ursula
To Punta Baja and down the coast road


As for the access road to the big sand beach just west of town where the river meets the sea (called La Bocana)... I drove there last year and it was an easy drive... I think just one place I had to drive over a hump made by a farmer's tractor. Like most great places to visit in Baja, you should have a 4WD truck or SUV with an air pump for refilling tires deflated for sand or rough roads. Take the road through El Rosario de Abajo (leave Hwy. 1 at the sharp curve, and follow signs, cross the river and continue west, where the Punta Baja road forks to the left, continue straight.

In March 2017:



1774 mission ruins (just off Hwy. 1, in town)


1802 mission ruins (along the road to the beach in El Rosario de Abajo)


La Bocana Beach



Petrified forest trail (north of La Bocana in the mud hills)

The town has two museums, the town museum is in the old school building in El Rosario de Abajo. Mama Espinoza's museum is across the highway from her restaurant, just after the sharp curve left.
I have photos from inside both.

La Lobera is another site worth visiting... I think Cindi called it 'La Ventana' on accident? Again, many photos of this sea lion crater I can share.

Go to http://vivabaja.com/tours/ and in the El Rosario Area section, click onto the links for each area of interest!





[Edited on 7-6-2018 by David K]




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

A Baja Missions History book, updated in 2018: http://oldmissions.com

My (over 50) Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

My Baja web site, to help you plan your adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 2018 Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Skipjack Joe
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 7312
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Half Moon Bay
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-6-2018 at 10:55 AM


"LOL this is an overnight stop, not a resort"

That's the approach the budget motel chain - Motel 6 - uses in the states. You need an overnight stay when going from point A to point B and when you turn the lights off one place is as good as another. In that case the Turista hotel down the road, or any other for that matter, is equally suitable. I've had to stay at the Turista and I'd much rather stay at Baja Cactus than there for a singe night. Turista is a one star motel, B Cactus is a 3 star motel. That's how I would rate it. Although, Antonios older rooms when I stayed in them were also 1 star.
View user's profile
wilderone
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3202
Registered: 2-9-2004
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-6-2018 at 02:06 PM


With Antonio's improvements to include a restaurant (breakfast, coffee the next morning before departure), he's cornered a segment of that market and is a smart move. The two decks of mezzanine type outdoor patio space are nice for a beer, wine after a day of driving, and you want to get out of your room. Maybe a little table with chairs out there. Chips/salsa to go (more $$ per room) and guests don't have to walk around town trying to find a little place for a beer. The coffee bar could have local empanadas, Bimbo muffins, fruit to go for travelers who can't stay for a sit-down breakfast. Most of his clientele may just spend one night, but I think Baja Cactus will be the first choice.
View user's profile
mtgoat666
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 11473
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Indivisible, resisting fascists in orange hair!

[*] posted on 7-6-2018 at 07:15 PM


Quote: Originally posted by wilderone  
With Antonio's improvements to include a restaurant (breakfast, coffee the next morning before departure), he's cornered a segment of that market and is a smart move. The two decks of mezzanine type outdoor patio space are nice for a beer, wine after a day of driving, and you want to get out of your room. Maybe a little table with chairs out there. Chips/salsa to go (more $$ per room) and guests don't have to walk around town trying to find a little place for a beer. The coffee bar could have local empanadas, Bimbo muffins, fruit to go for travelers who can't stay for a sit-down breakfast. Most of his clientele may just spend one night, but I think Baja Cactus will be the first choice.


Espresso shots, fruit, smoothies, yogurt/granola bfast might be interesting.
Pho dinner place would be nice.
Bahn mi sandwhiches to go for travelers

Or just serve same old boring food found elsewhere in town!




Make America Decent Again
View user's profile
wilderone
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3202
Registered: 2-9-2004
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-7-2018 at 11:48 AM


ooooh - yeah - juice bar, fruit smoothies and ice cream bars at an outside counter for all the people who stop for gas.
View user's profile
drzura
Nomad
**




Posts: 243
Registered: 7-1-2006
Location: Cotati, CA/San Lucas Cove B.C.S.
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-8-2018 at 06:53 AM
Does Cactus allow pets?


Good day. We'll be driving down the Baja in a little more than a week. There will be three of us plus one labrador dog. Does Baja Cactus allow pets? Luka is mild mannered and well behaved. Thanks in advance.....
View user's profile
BajaMama
Nomad
**




Posts: 432
Registered: 10-4-2015
Location: Pleasanton/Punta Chivato
Member Is Offline

Mood: Excited for Baja!

[*] posted on 7-8-2018 at 06:57 AM


Yes, Baja Cactus does have designated pet rooms, I always have my dog when I travel Baja. I have a REALLY big lightweight bed cover I always put on hotel/motel beds so his fur isn't an issue should he decide to hop up. Just let them know when you make the reservation. The gated parking lot is a nice "relief" area with a lined trashcan, you will need your own poop baggies as they are not provided.

[Edited on 7-8-2018 by BajaMama]
View user's profile
surfhat
Nomad
**




Posts: 155
Registered: 6-4-2012
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 7-8-2018 at 08:27 AM


I always took a dog bed with me, and my dogs knew better than to jump up on furniture on the road or at home.

Those cool tiled floors were the best place for them anyway, and I am sure the hotel staff appreciated the little effort it took to keep them off the furniture.

The check in person always appreciated my due diligence.

Once in a while at home, I would give them the privilege of jumping up on my bed for some good loving on a Sunday morning when I was kicking back and not going anywhere, but they always knew it was by permission only.

Every dog owner has their own way and they are all valid.

One last sentiment I heard a few years ago that touches my heart is:

A simple gaze from us, is like a hug to them.

Unconditional love is rare, but with mans best friends, comes naturally. Thanks to mostly all here.

View user's profile
 Pages:  1  ..  3    5

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright � 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group�






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262