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Author: Subject: Motorcycle trip question.
bajatrailrider
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[*] posted on 12-30-2018 at 06:48 PM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Op:
Dont listen to the critics. They are all overweight gringos that need an extra 200 cc to haul their beer guts. They also cant camp without a generator, tv, microwave, blender and heavy duty cots (heavy duty for those beer bellies).

Gringos are heavy travelers, carry too much stuff, they think you need a ford expedition just to shop the corner grocery store.

You can travel with under 35 lbs of gear, ask any backpacker or bicylcle tourer, or ask any non-gringo.
HAAAA the village Idiot MT666 gives advice Does not even know how ride a dirt bike. A Troll comes:bounce: to life
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[*] posted on 12-30-2018 at 07:16 PM


Quote: Originally posted by bajatrailrider  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Op:
Dont listen to the critics. They are all overweight gringos that need an extra 200 cc to haul their beer guts. They also cant camp without a generator, tv, microwave, blender and heavy duty cots (heavy duty for those beer bellies).

Gringos are heavy travelers, carry too much stuff, they think you need a ford expedition just to shop the corner grocery store.

You can travel with under 35 lbs of gear, ask any backpacker or bicylcle tourer, or ask any non-gringo.
HAAAA the village Idiot MT666 gives advice Does not even know how ride a dirt bike. A Troll comes:bounce: to life


The toothless knuckle-dragging grammarian speaks!

Hey toothless,
The first person to ride across continental USA in a motorcycle had more smaller bike, less luggage and bigger dick than you!

“Wyman used his 1902 California machine for his crossing of the United States. The California had a 200 cc (12 cu in), 1.5 hp (1.1 kW) four-stroke engine attached to an ordinary diamond-frame bicycle.[2][5][6] Wyman's machine was equipped with 28 x 1.5 in. tires, wooden rims, a leading-link front suspension fork, a Garford spring saddle, a Duck Brake Company front roller brake, and a 1902-patent Atherton rear coaster brake.[2][5][7] A leather belt-drive with a spring-loaded idler pulley directly connected the engine output shaft to the rear wheel.[5] Using a standard steel bicycle frame, the California weighed approximately 70–80 pounds (32–36 kg) without rider, and was capable of approximately 25 mph (40 km/h) using the 30-octane gasoline of the day, with a range of 75 to 100 miles (121 to 161 km).[5][8] Throttle control was not yet perfected, and engine revolutions were mainly controlled by means of a spark timing mechanism.[5] The wick-type carburetor was crude, consisting of a metal box with internal baffles stuffed with cotton batting.[9] With no float chamber, the rider had to open the gasoline tap periodically to admit fuel into the carburetor.

For such a long trip, Wyman carried a remarkably small amount of gear. A set of warm clothing, money, water bottle, cans for spare oil and gasoline, a Kodak Vest Pocket camera, a cyclometer, various bicycle tools and spare parts, and a long-barreled .38 Smith & Wesson revolver constituted his total luggage.”




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[*] posted on 12-30-2018 at 08:56 PM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by bajatrailrider  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Op:
Dont listen to the critics. They are all overweight gringos that need an extra 200 cc to haul their beer guts. They also cant camp without a generator, tv, microwave, blender and heavy duty cots (heavy duty for those beer bellies).

Gringos are heavy travelers, carry too much stuff, they think you need a ford expedition just to shop the corner grocery store.

You can travel with under 35 lbs of gear, ask any backpacker or bicylcle tourer, or ask any non-gringo.
HAAAA the village Idiot MT666 gives advice Does not even know how ride a dirt bike. A Troll comes:bounce: to life


The toothless knuckle-dragging grammarian speaks!

Hey toothless,
The first person to ride across continental USA in a motorcycle had more smaller bike, less luggage and bigger dick than you!

“Wyman used his 1902 California machine for his crossing of the United States. The California had a 200 cc (12 cu in), 1.5 hp (1.1 kW) four-stroke engine attached to an ordinary diamond-frame bicycle.[2][5][6] Wyman's machine was equipped with 28 x 1.5 in. tires, wooden rims, a leading-link front suspension fork, a Garford spring saddle, a Duck Brake Company front roller brake, and a 1902-patent Atherton rear coaster brake.[2][5][7] A leather belt-drive with a spring-loaded idler pulley directly connected the engine output shaft to the rear wheel.[5] Using a standard steel bicycle frame, the California weighed approximately 70–80 pounds (32–36 kg) without rider, and was capable of approximately 25 mph (40 km/h) using the 30-octane gasoline of the day, with a range of 75 to 100 miles (121 to 161 km).[5][8] Throttle control was not yet perfected, and engine revolutions were mainly controlled by means of a spark timing mechanism.[5] The wick-type carburetor was crude, consisting of a metal box with internal baffles stuffed with cotton batting.[9] With no float chamber, the rider had to open the gasoline tap periodically to admit fuel into the carburetor.

For such a long trip, Wyman carried a remarkably small amount of gear. A set of warm clothing, money, water bottle, cans for spare oil and gasoline, a Kodak Vest Pocket camera, a cyclometer, various bicycle tools and spare parts, and a long-barreled .38 Smith & Wesson revolver constituted his total luggage.”


If Wyman were traveling today he would go with this, and take goat along to help with fuel expenses.




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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 09:37 AM


A lot of good advice given. I ride a KTM 500 EXC and love it, magic button and plenty of power, the 350 is just as good but the prices and weight are almost the same. They aren't cheap but you can turn around and sell it for what you paid after the trip!
We left our truck on the US side of the Tecate crossing for 30 dollars a month and nothing was missing when we got back, worked out good. We travel lite and hotel it but if you keep the weight down with your gear you will be just fine. Look up some Baja ride reports on ADVRIDER, a few good ones about camping off of smaller bikes in Baja.
I think you have a very solid plan/dream and should get out and do it while you can, wait to sit around the until you have to! Have the wife fly into Cabo for a week when you get there and hangout. Lets get this ride started already....


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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 10:08 AM


For whatever bike you choose, I recommend you strongly consider the height of the bike. Riding in loose dirt/sand is SO much easier and safer if you can dab your feet when you need to. The more flat-footed that dabbing is, the less chance you'll end up in a pile with your bike. If your bike is tall, consider lowering it to a height that allows for this.
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 10:51 AM


Great information amigos de Baja California. I am 5 foot 10, 190 pounds of fat and muscle so almost any bike will do. No prescriptions needed to keep me going, few vitamins and minerals to keep me healthy. All my friends are into a completely different life than me, they are still accumulating money and stuff. Competing with the Joneses. I know it sounds crazy as my wife continues to remind me of it. I could stay at the lake, sailing and drinking Lake county wine every day with the BBQd meat. But I have a dream that keeps coming back year after year specially after reading Baja Nomads posts and viewing pictures. Gracias que tengan un Feliz Agno nuevo. Salud y Bienestar!
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 11:26 AM


I was caught up in the rut of keeping up with the Jones at one time, but now we are down sizing so we can travel more and enjoy the world, not stuff! I can retire at 50 making a little less than waiting until 53 or 55, under two years I'm out!
Another good bike that might fit your budget better and will get the job done is a Suzuki DRZ 400. I've had several and they are good all around but plan on doing the seat, jetting and a little suspension work! Better yet buy one that is done and let the seller eat the price of the extras!
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deportes
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 11:43 AM


Thanks advrider. I will look into the bike.
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 12:13 PM


Picking the "right bike" is up to the individual....likely after a few years of riding experience....most opinions will reflect the person's personal choices....which may not match the OP's experience/preferences.

Some folks want a golf-cart ride, others a low seat aspect due to genetic predispositions, and the rest want dependability/fun factors.

Some are dreamers....some are doers....

Some models suggested are antique models no longer in production....and difficult to find in good shape....

Practical advice is different than "nay-saying" responses...a dedicated rider will likely want good equipment...fair-weather riders will be less demanding for occasional weekend-warrioring...

Synopsis:

*** KTM/Husky 350-525 range are top choices for serious riders;
*** Suzuki 350-400 might be next in line....after suspension work...but heavier;
*** Whatever runs suits the rest....cuz it's just about having fun out there :coolup:

Now....let's talk tars and oil....




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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 01:42 PM


Ok, sounds like we have ruled out doing this on a 250, which is what I thought was very silly. I mean we ride 250's, but with a chase truck, and generally not more than 100 miles a day, usually closer to 60-80 miles a day.

After you've got a bike, the next step would be to start riding local to build up your skills. Tons of places in California to do that. In SoCal, our favorite spot is Ballinger Canyon.



[Edited on 12-31-2018 by JZ]




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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:00 PM


Quote: Originally posted by motoged  

Now....let's talk tars and oil....


I think my buddy is looking for some "tars" for his DRZ400S. He does mostly dirt riding, with some street, mainly Green Valley Lake (San Bernardino's) and Earthquake Valley (Anza Borrego?). Any recommendations?

How about tubes? He had a flat on one of the XT's and we put a premium thick tube as replacement.

John

[Edited on 12-31-2018 by John Harper]
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:16 PM


I can ride in Cow mountain recreation area near Clearlake Ca. where I live 50 % of the time. used to ride dirt bicycle all over Ca hills and mountains so I should be able to handle the dirt. How does a 650KLR sound, I know its far from a 350 400cc but the prices are cheap on those bikes.
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:18 PM


Quote: Originally posted by John Harper  
Quote: Originally posted by motoged  

Now....let's talk tars and oil....


I think my buddy is looking for some "tars" for his DRZ400S. He does mostly dirt riding, with some street, mainly Green Valley Lake (San Bernardino's) and Earthquake Valley (Anza Borrego?). Any recommendations?

How about tubes? He had a flat on one of the XT's and we put a premium thick tube as replacement.

John

[Edited on 12-31-2018 by John Harper]


Larry (bajatrailrider) has some xlnt advice here, use the search function:yes:
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:22 PM


Quote: Originally posted by motoged  
Picking the "right bike" is up to the individual....likely after a few years of riding experience....most opinions will reflect the person's personal choices....which may not match the OP's experience/preferences.

Some folks want a golf-cart ride, others a low seat aspect due to genetic predispositions, and the rest want dependability/fun factors.

Some are dreamers....some are doers....

Some models suggested are antique models no longer in production....and difficult to find in good shape....

Practical advice is different than "nay-saying" responses...a dedicated rider will likely want good equipment...fair-weather riders will be less demanding for occasional weekend-warrioring...

Synopsis:

*** KTM/Husky 350-525 range are top choices for serious riders;
*** Suzuki 350-400 might be next in line....after suspension work...but heavier;
*** Whatever runs suits the rest....cuz it's just about having fun out there :coolup:

Now....let's talk tars and oil....


This !!!
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:26 PM


Quote: Originally posted by deportes  
I can ride in Cow mountain recreation area near Clearlake Ca. where I live 50 % of the time. used to ride dirt bicycle all over Ca hills and mountains so I should be able to handle the dirt. How does a 650KLR sound, I know its far from a 350 400cc but the prices are cheap on those bikes.


I haven't ridden one, but I sat on a new one at a local Dealer... It was pretty tall for me, and I'm also about your size. Other than that, I really liked the bike. I've heard about problems with the 2008 and 2009 engines - you might want to stay away from those models.

A 650 is a lot of dirt bike if you don't have dirt experience on a motorcycle.
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:30 PM


For sure you want to be able to change a flat pretty easily in the field.

If you need any tracks let me know, I've got thousands of miles of them.





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Ever wanted to camp on a deserted island in the Sea of Cortez? https://youtu.be/g3ThXCm3XSA

Come along for a ride of the famous Seven Sisters https://youtu.be/hrdzmTWPUQs



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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:35 PM


Thanks, yup. pretty big bike. cheap doesn't mean good fit. Forget about it.
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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:36 PM


Something with electric start is good. Some of those big singles are hard to kick. And don't start easy when hot.



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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 02:45 PM


Watercooled



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[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 03:02 PM


a week away from Dakar and A1......just stay home and watch it!:lol:
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