BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2    4  
Author: Subject: Motorcycle trip question.
pacificobob
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 742
Registered: 4-23-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 03:52 PM


Quote: Originally posted by imlost  
For whatever bike you choose, I recommend you strongly consider the height of the bike. Riding in loose dirt/sand is SO much easier and safer if you can dab your feet when you need to. The more flat-footed that dabbing is, the less chance you'll end up in a pile with your bike. If your bike is tall, consider lowering it to a height that allows for this.

good council
View user's profile
advrider
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 606
Registered: 10-2-2015
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 03:58 PM


I've ridden several KLR'S and they can do anything, they just don't do dirt or sand very well. Heavy and under powered, tall geared, good for some slab. Whatever bike you get, get out in some deep sand and get comfortable with it, you will be glad you did.
View user's profile
JZ
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 3117
Registered: 10-3-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 04:26 PM


Quote: Originally posted by advrider  
Whatever bike you get, get out in some deep sand and get comfortable with it, you will be glad you did.


Yep. Lots of Baja trails have gnarly deep sand in patches where you hit the washes. Your first reaction will be to slow down, but this creates more instability. Keeping your speed and giving it even more throttle gives you much greater control.

Unless you've experienced this, hitting it for the first time in Baja is gonna be eye opening.

At least it doesn't hurt much if you go down, but you are dirty as hell. :yes:



[Edited on 12-31-2018 by JZ]




See Baja California in 4K: https://youtu.be/4VNTIhRa6q0

Ever wanted to camp on a deserted island in the Sea of Cortez? https://youtu.be/g3ThXCm3XSA

Come along for a ride of the famous Seven Sisters https://youtu.be/hrdzmTWPUQs



View user's profile
willardguy
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 6003
Registered: 9-19-2009
Location: rosarito
Member Is Offline

Mood: im good

[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 04:28 PM


the deciding factor will be whether he decides to run whatcha brung or put something in the bed, I know what I'd do! whats Larry say??
View user's profile
imlost
Nomad
**




Posts: 203
Registered: 3-31-2015
Location: PNW & East Cape
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 04:36 PM


Quote: Originally posted by JZ  
Quote: Originally posted by advrider  
Whatever bike you get, get out in some deep sand and get comfortable with it, you will be glad you did.


Yep. Lots of Baja trails have gnarly deep sand in patches where you hit the washes. Your first reaction will be to slow down, but this creates more instability. Keeping your speed and giving it even more throttle gives you much greater control.

Unless you've experienced this, hitting it for the first time in Baja is gonna be eye opening.

At least it doesn't hurt much if you go down, but you are dirty as hell. :yes:



[Edited on 12-31-2018 by JZ]
I agree. There's sort of a sweet spot. Too slow, and you have no control. There's a point in acceleration that you gain control by going faster - sort of like when you learned to ride a bicycle. I think it's safest to stay in that sweet spot - Too fast, and you risk major sand munch. 3rd gear is great on my bike.
View user's profile
KurtG
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1043
Registered: 1-27-2004
Location: California Central Coast
Member Is Offline

Mood: Press On Regardless!!

[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 05:01 PM


Quote: Originally posted by deportes  
Thanks, yup. pretty big bike. cheap doesn't mean good fit. Forget about it.

I have 150k miles on my KLR. Do not confuse it with a dirt bike. It has served me well since it is a pretty good highway bike and handles most dirt roads and two track ok but it is heavy and has a high center of gravity. Mine has seen lots of Baja dirt miles but with lots of caution. The KLR has a reputation as a workhorse which is well deserved but it has not changed much mechanically since it was introduced 31 years ago.
View user's profile
basautter
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 765
Registered: 7-1-2013
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 05:35 PM


In reference to prior posts, and posts to come, the KLR 650 is a good machine for pavement and firm dirt, but front heavy and a pig in soft terrain. The DRZ 400 is not a bad choice at all. A bit heavy, but manageable in sand and silt. Plus, it's a nice ride on pavement and gravel roads. The XR400 is good if you are on a budget. It's old school technology (conventional forks, air cooled, no electric start...) but get's the job done. I have ridden all three in a variety of terrains. The KTM XC-W 300 remains my favorite (also older EXC-300s). :light::light:


[Edited on 1-1-2019 by basautter]

[Edited on 1-1-2019 by basautter]
View user's profile
imlost
Nomad
**




Posts: 203
Registered: 3-31-2015
Location: PNW & East Cape
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 06:00 PM


It's good to hear from you guys with actual KLR 650 experience.
View user's profile
fishbuck
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 5100
Registered: 8-31-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 06:31 PM


4-stroke probably best.



"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. – Albert Einstein

"Life's a Beach... and then you Fly!" Fishbuck

View user's profile
fishbuck
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 5100
Registered: 8-31-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 06:46 PM






"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. – Albert Einstein

"Life's a Beach... and then you Fly!" Fishbuck

View user's profile
fishbuck
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 5100
Registered: 8-31-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 10:28 PM


screen shot pc



"A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." J. A. Shedd.

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it. – Albert Einstein

"Life's a Beach... and then you Fly!" Fishbuck

View user's profile
bajatrailrider
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1344
Registered: 1-24-2015
Location: Mexico
Member Is Offline

Mood: Happy

[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 10:37 PM


He should haul a bike close to border go from there. Unload go Xr400 best. Or Wr450f those two bikes most reliable. 5 ft 8 and under geared up crf230f with few mods works well for short less exp rider. If he wants to ride dirt the fools sport bikes way too heavy. KTMs plated too much coin too tall for short riders. Crf450L too new to tell if a no problem bike. Two smokes poor choice unless someone hauls fuel for you.
View user's profile
bajatrailrider
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1344
Registered: 1-24-2015
Location: Mexico
Member Is Offline

Mood: Happy

[*] posted on 12-31-2018 at 10:52 PM


Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by bajatrailrider  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Op:
Dont listen to the critics. They are all overweight gringos that need an extra 200 cc to haul their beer guts. They also cant camp without a generator, tv, microwave, blender and heavy duty cots (heavy duty for those beer bellies).

Gringos are heavy travelers, carry too much stuff, they think you need a ford expedition just to shop the corner grocery store.
This is what we need idiot info from 1902 are you just stupid yes hair brains. You could not ride a dirt bike 5 feet in the sand. :bounce: Toothless loser JAAAAA
You can travel with under 35 lbs of gear, ask any backpacker or bicylcle tourer, or ask any non-gringo.
HAAAA the village Idiot MT666 gives advice Does not even know how ride a dirt bike. A Troll comes:bounce: to life


The toothless knuckle-dragging grammarian speaks!

Hey toothless,
The first person to ride across continental USA in a motorcycle had more smaller bike, less luggage and bigger dick than you!

“Wyman used his 1902 California machine for his crossing of the United States. The California had a 200 cc (12 cu in), 1.5 hp (1.1 kW) four-stroke engine attached to an ordinary diamond-frame bicycle.[2][5][6] Wyman's machine was equipped with 28 x 1.5 in. tires, wooden rims, a leading-link front suspension fork, a Garford spring saddle, a Duck Brake Company front roller brake, and a 1902-patent Atherton rear coaster brake.[2][5][7] A leather belt-drive with a spring-loaded idler pulley directly connected the engine output shaft to the rear wheel.[5] Using a standard steel bicycle frame, the California weighed approximately 70–80 pounds (32–36 kg) without rider, and was capable of approximately 25 mph (40 km/h) using the 30-octane gasoline of the day, with a range of 75 to 100 miles (121 to 161 km).[5][8] Throttle control was not yet perfected, and engine revolutions were mainly controlled by means of a spark timing mechanism.[5] The wick-type carburetor was crude, consisting of a metal box with internal baffles stuffed with cotton batting.[9] With no float chamber, the rider had to open the gasoline tap periodically to admit fuel into the carburetor.

For such a long trip, Wyman carried a remarkably small amount of gear. A set of warm clothing, money, water bottle, cans for spare oil and gasoline, a Kodak Vest Pocket camera, a cyclometer, various bicycle tools and spare parts, and a long-barreled .38 Smith & Wesson revolver constituted his total luggage.”
Real good toothless Idiot advice from 1902 . Poor loser knows:bounce::bounce: nothing cant ride a bike but gives advice.

[Edited on 1-1-2019 by bajatrailrider]
View user's profile
pacificobob
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 742
Registered: 4-23-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 09:42 AM


i think the klr is an excellent motorbike....just really boring. not very perky. i have met guys riding in viet nam, kazakstan and china who are halfway on an around the world trip. very few problems.
View user's profile
basautter
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 765
Registered: 7-1-2013
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 05:18 AM


True, the KLR is bomb proof and a good ride, just not the best in loose sand and silt. Most bikes are not, with the exception of MX and endure models. If you want to ride beaches, the KLR is not on the A list.
View user's profile
bajatrailrider
Super Nomad
****




Posts: 1344
Registered: 1-24-2015
Location: Mexico
Member Is Offline

Mood: Happy

[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 08:29 AM


The KLR has been around for ever great bike. As far as in the dirt hard pack ok. Where we ride no go horse trail no trail mud Sand Hill climb. Since any dirt road we ride aways has places washed out or hard spot's. The KLR would be best left on the street.
View user's profile
Italianewbie
Newbie





Posts: 2
Registered: 1-26-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-27-2019 at 10:16 PM


Quote: Originally posted by deportes  
Thanks KurtG. I am still pondering the idea. My wife laughs at me saying I should stay at home on the lake, sailing and enjoying life. Yo sigo pensando en Mexico y la belleza de Baja California.
Salud.


I've sent you a PM, I'm very inteested.
View user's profile
Fatboy
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 599
Registered: 6-28-2005
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-29-2019 at 11:02 AM


Lots of advice on here, some good.

If you do it, just treat it as the adventure that it is.

People have ridden trail 90's farther, so just about anything would work, some bikes, would just take a little more effort and planning.

Always thought it would be cool to try a long trip on a mid-70's to mid-80's dual-sport bike.

Either way I think many would love to hear about your trip on here if you do end up going.
View user's profile
elfbrewery
Nomad
**




Posts: 287
Registered: 12-25-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-29-2019 at 02:08 PM


Yes, please post a report!
View user's profile
advrider
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 606
Registered: 10-2-2015
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 1-29-2019 at 08:36 PM


Look at CL and see what fits your price. XR400, DRZ 400, whatever you like, just do it! I'm past kicking a bike over after severing my ACL in Baja and ridding my XR650R five days back to the border! When you get tired or hurt the magic button, is, well, MAGIC... If you start at the border a 250 would work just fine two!
View user's profile
 Pages:  1  2    4  

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright � 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group�






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262