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ReTire
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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 05:35 PM
CB channel for Baja


Is there a commonly used channel for gringos in Baja?
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ehall
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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 06:38 PM


Alot of people on marine channels. CB stays quiet down there. Vhf/uhf radios also being used.
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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 07:15 PM


The use of CB has really died off. Skip noise during the day keeps the use primarily to caravans who have their squelch turned way up to cut out the noise. Pick any channel (other than 9) and I doubt if it will bother anyone if anyone locally is on. You have 39 channels to pick from.

We used CB during the 2015 Pole Line Road group trip and during my 2016 Baja Extreme tour. I didn't even bring my CB on all my 2017 expeditions... just the inReach satellite device... as I was driving solo.




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Bob and Susan
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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 07:21 PM


people here use cell phones




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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 07:46 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ReTire  
Is there a commonly used channel for gringos in Baja?


Most people in even the smallest towns use texting and television over cell network or local WiFi.
Some ranchers use radio, with repeaters on hill tops
Most all Fishermen use radios.
A few Gringo communities w/o cell, such as bola, have radio channels networks for communication, mostly about planning c-cktail hour and shared runs to the store to restock tequila and gin.




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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 08:22 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Bob and Susan  
people here use cell phones


Yeah, nothing like placing 6-10 individual phone calls to members of your caravan...........EACH TIME you want to communicate.

Radios also allow you to connect to others in your area who are on the same frequency. Often a good source of local info from people whose phone numbers you don't have.

There is a reason why radio communication still exists in the cell phone era, Bob.

An open party line where information can be shared IMMEDIATELY has it's benefits. There's lots of communication that is better handled on a non-personal, general broadcast level.........unless you prefer repeating the same message X times on a personal level with a cell phone. Texting group messages on cell phones can work...........but you must have cell tower access and, depending on your cell phone plan, texts might be expensive in Mexico.

To the original poster, if you are looking for connecting with English-speaking persons outside of your immediate group while in Mexico, a marine VHF radio is a much better choice. Many gringo communities centered around boating or fishing have organized radio "nets" (regularly scheduled broadcasts where information is shared and questions are asked and answered by ANYONE who can transmit and receive). They are great sources of local information.

Goat, the community I live in in Mexico has cell phone coverage. Lack of cell coverage is NOT the reason these "nets" exist.

If you are looking for car-to-car communications within your group, consider the hand held, inexpensive FRS radios.

[Edited on 1-2-2019 by Hook]
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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 09:01 PM


VHF/UHF all bands 0-1000mhz handheld 8watts use Chirp software to create a custom map of channels for your needs across local FRS, MURS, HAM, Marine, UHF. VHF it's fun

[Edited on 1-2-2019 by gnukid]
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[*] posted on 1-1-2019 at 09:09 PM


CBs are not a good choice for good communications. They are AM modulated which means lots of noise sources get into them such as power lines, transformers, car static, lightning. FM is virtually noise free so any radio that is FM is good to use.

The FRS radios that Hook mentions above are FM and are good for communications between cars etc. and don't require a license in the US. They are on UHF frequencies at 2 watts or less so they are pretty much line of sight.

Personally I prefer a VHF radio either handheld or mobile similar to what is used by off road racers. Although today many off road racers are using satellite phones as well as two-way radios.
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 07:27 AM


I have a hard wired in CB my truck, so it’s going with me. It’s old enough that it doesn’t have a scan feature. The reason for the question.

I do have a handheld marine band radio. Guess I will bring it based on the responses.

Thanks
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 07:50 AM


Actually the VHF frequencies begin at 30 MHz up to 300 MHz. The wavelength is between 1 and 10 meters hence the 2 meter band is VHF. Anything below 30 MHz would be a poor place to operate a little 8 watt handheld due to competition from the big boys running lots of power. 0-1000 MHz is inclusive of the HF and LF bands, not usable for low power equipment communications.

Hand held (or mobile @ 25 watts) marine radios are commonly used effectively both on land and in the SOC in Baja. Established marine nets allow communications and information throughout the area (within range). There are 2 meter repeaters for ham operators in some areas that increase range of these radios. Hams "should" get the reciprocal license through SCT.

One caution to using marine VHF radios: channel 16 is the marine emergency frequency monitored by Port authorities and the Navy. There are port channels and Navy channels as well. Excepting these designated channels, there are many others for use.

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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 08:58 AM


CB low wattage = short range, and inferior quality.
Marine limited frequencies low wattage = short range
Vhf with moderate wattage = long range.Lots of frequencies, more watts = longer range.
VHF is what everyone uses = able to communicate.
Buy a hand held Boufong off the web for 30 -69 dollars and get a radio with low wattage and ability to talk to other vhf = short range
Most of us have 50-75 watt radios that cost a whole lot more than any of the above.
Phones don't work in the boondocks. Telcel/ATT has the best coverage.
No designated VHF frequencies. Ask you buddy what frequency he wants to use. Its like a phone you need a number to communicate.
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 09:00 AM


had one hard wired into my truck...seems like most people-even in isolated fishing villages use cells now.

one fun thing is you can communicate with people a long way off if conditions are right. for example, one morning heading east out from la purism we were communicating with folks in texas on the cb… kind of a fun way to start the long road home!
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 09:34 AM


I use 3x baofengs 82hp and sometimes use optional Nagoya antennas 771 (I think) and share them with the group with set two channels and lock it if desired. They also have FM and of course all marine channels etc. Use Chirp software and USB cable to program. In some areas its the only form of tele communication that works.

[Edited on 1-3-2019 by gnukid]
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 12:58 PM


If one is interested in truly long-range communications from isolated places in Baja a ham license enabling HF radio use can't be beat. Ham tests are pretty easy now and administered by volunteer examiners. Simply study the question pool available on the Internet. HF radios can run up to 1000 watts, but mobile radios the size of a CB usually run 100 watts. On the lower bands (20 meters for example) you can talk world-wide, use a Pactor modem and do Internet e-mail, have telephone phone patches back to the states. Most sailboat cruisers in the SOC have ham licenses and HF radios and are never out of touch. We daily used e-mail and phone patches in our boat while in and around La Paz and when off-road in other parts of the peninsula. Local line of sight communications are great with VHF/UHF radios, but true long-range contacts are down in the HF spectrum.

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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 01:15 PM


Quote: Originally posted by ReTire  
Is there a commonly used channel for gringos in Baja?


Read this thread. We use VHF marine channels 68 and 72.

http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=90605


[Edited on 1-2-2019 by JZ]




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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 01:20 PM


JZ, are you going to make us look up the frequencies for your channels. Most of us do not use a channel number for our radios. Name and/or frequency. And we don't carry around teh marine frequency/channel chart.
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 01:26 PM


Thanks Jack, Pretty advanced for most of the Nomads. Now days we are using satellite radio to accomplish basic communication. This is why for the Baja races we cannot listen in of the various race team chatter. For sure the Ham radio guys sure have all the whistles and bells.

Quote: Originally posted by Jack Swords  
If one is interested in truly long-range communications from isolated places in Baja a ham license enabling HF radio use can't be beat. Ham tests are pretty easy now and administered by volunteer examiners. Simply study the question pool available on the Internet. HF radios can run up to 1000 watts, but mobile radios the size of a CB usually run 100 watts. On the lower bands (20 meters for example) you can talk world-wide, use a Pactor modem and do Internet e-mail, have telephone phone patches back to the states. Most sailboat cruisers in the SOC have ham licenses and HF radios and are never out of touch. We daily used e-mail and phone patches in our boat while in and around La Paz and when off-road in other parts of the peninsula. Local line of sight communications are great with VHF/UHF radios, but true long-range contacts are down in the HF spectrum.

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JZ
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[*] posted on 1-2-2019 at 01:29 PM


68 156.425 MHz Maritime Radio
72 156.625 MHz

I also have 16 programmed, but don't transmit on it obviously.

16 156.800 MHz International Distress, Safety & Calling

Here is the list of VHF marine frequencies: https://www.mobilesystems.co.nz/news_and_publications/id/51/...

Baofeng and Yaesu radios allow you to assign a channel number to a frequency. So I setup 16, 68, and 72 on our HH's and truck radio.



[Edited on 1-2-2019 by JZ]




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