BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]

Go To Bottom
Printable Version  
 Pages:  1    3
Author: Subject: Breakdown stories
AKgringo
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3119
Registered: 9-20-2014
Location: Los Anchorage, AK
Member Is Online

Mood: Retireded

[*] posted on 8-18-2019 at 09:11 AM


It could have been worse, a lot worse! I would tell you about a clean, customized Chevy that went through a tide cycle a couple of miles south of Deep Creek, but that would be an Alaska hijack, not a Baja story!



If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much space!

"Could do better if he tried!" Report card comments from most of my grade school teachers. Sadly, still true!
View user's profile
defrag4
Nomad
**




Posts: 323
Registered: 2-5-2011
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-19-2019 at 04:29 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Finchaser2020  
I got stuck once :)

[Edited on 8-18-2019 by BajaNomad]


poor yota :o




Driving the PanAmerican Highway
https://www.facebook.com/homeonthehighway/
View user's profile
JZ
Elite Nomad
******


Avatar


Posts: 3530
Registered: 10-3-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-19-2019 at 04:53 PM


All mine are boat related.

Lost 1 engine coming back from Kino Bay to San Carlos, Sonora. Limped for 60 miles. Took a very long time.

Same thing crossing from Santa Rosalia to the mainland. Middle of the SoC, and we lost an engine. Took 5 hours to make it in. Super calm day. We cooked taco on the grill and drank Pacificos.

Last year we were coming back from the islands in La Paz and the dumb ass captain under estimated the amount of gas required. We very luckily made it across the channel to near Balandra before it died. It was really rough through the gap, would have been nasty to be floating out there.

Biggest on land break down was trying to ride the Pioneer Mine trail about a year ago. My kid's bike over heated. One of his friends ran into him when we were out riding a couple weeks before. Turns out the radiator was really pushed in underneath the plastics.





See Baja California in 4K: https://youtu.be/4VNTIhRa6q0

Ever wanted to camp on a deserted island in the Sea of Cortez? https://youtu.be/g3ThXCm3XSA

Come along for a ride of the famous Seven Sisters https://youtu.be/hrdzmTWPUQs



View user's profile
mtgoat666
Platinum Nomad
********




Posts: 12280
Registered: 9-16-2006
Location: San Diego
Member Is Offline

Mood: Very stable genius!

[*] posted on 8-19-2019 at 07:50 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Finchaser2020  
Sold the truck to a friend in El Socorro and it was used there for a few years. I heard that it ended up in Ensenada. It was the source of many stories about mechanical problems......go figure.....lol

Amazing it ran at all after spending two high tides on the beach...

And yes, insurance did not cover getting it stuck in the ocean :)

The most difficult part of the adventure was trying to explain how it all went down to the wife!

We are headed back down this November!


Hopefully you learned your lesson!

I never drive on the beach for a variety of reasons:
You never know when liquefaction or non-cohesive sand will trap you (looks are deceiving)
Getting stuck sucks (and you only got a few hours to get the flock unstuck- been there-done that)
Majority of beach users are ANNOYED by vehicles on the beach, so why be that @sshat?;
Driving on beach is damaging to habitat; and
It is illegal most everywhere.




Make America DECENT Again!

Resist!

View user's profile
mooose29
Nomad
**




Posts: 189
Registered: 10-1-2008
Location: Encinitas/Punta Chivato, Rancho Partera
Member Is Offline

Mood: All Smiles

[*] posted on 8-19-2019 at 11:01 PM


Finchaser a great video and quite a wild story/adventure

About 10 years ago or so I was following my Dad in his giant 4x4 motorhome through Viscaino. At the south end headed out of town there is a very large speed bump that we know is there as we have been traveling in Baja my entire life.

My Dad forgot about the bump and being late afternoon/evening just didn’t see it and hit the thing going about 30-40. I see the ass end of the motor home go flying up and everything comes to a quick stop with the rear axle hanging at a very unnatural angle.

Hitting the bump sheared off one of the shackles holding the rear axle to the motorhome. This all happened in front of about a dozen men hanging out drinking beer and having a good time. We immediately had several “mechanics” on hand and within about 20 minutes with a 4x4 chunk of wood, a high lift jack, some chain, a come along, and a lot of beer, laughs, and plenty of opinions we had the axle back in place and the motor home drivable so we could get it to the shop of one of the helpers.

Within about 30 minutes of being at the shop the mechanic had found an old shackle somewhere out in the desert and some other hardware needed, got his welder out and before we know the repairs were done and we were ready to be back on the road.

The mechanic refused to take anything more than about $25 bucks even though we were insisting he accept more he would not. When back in the States my Dad and I went to Sears and bought a 200-250 piece craftsman’s tool set and next time down we stopped by and dropped off the tools and had some more laughs about that speed bump with the mechanic.

I have several more great stories that I will try and write up in the next day or so. One constant is we have always been able to get fixed and back on the road and we have truly experienced some of the best of people and Baja when broken down.
View user's profile
SFandH
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 5262
Registered: 8-5-2011
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-20-2019 at 08:11 AM


I bet speed bumps have broken many cars. And that reminds me of my latest automotive mishap. This past May I was driving north and at the little town just south of the Bahia de Los Angeles turnoff I had to brake (break) heavily because a speed bump suddenly appeared. The 3/4 ton 2003 Ford with the Callen camper loaded with stuff started to stop and then the brake pedal went down to the floor. Chit! No brakes in the middle of nowhere. Now what?

Luckily there was a spot to get off the road and I managed to stop, the brakes still worked but barely. Looked under the truck and the brake line to the right rear wheel is broken. This truck has lived within the sound of waves breaking on the beach its whole life and everything not painted is rusted. The brake line just rusted away. I had a quart of brake fluid with me so I topped off the reservoir, turned around and went the short distance back to the little town.

Just off the highway, I found a mechanic with a bunch of wrecks in his yard. He scavenged a brake line off of some kind of Ford that had the right connectors on it, installed it, bled the brakes, and after a couple of hours or so away we went. He wanted 600 pesos, I gave him 1000.

I just sold the rust-bucket for $500 to a friend. 168,000 miles. It looks OK and runs good, it's just all the rust underneath and in the engine compartment. The buyer was fully aware of the rust issues and jury-rigged brake line.



[Edited on 8-20-2019 by SFandH]




Want to adopt a mellow Baja dog or cat? - https://www.facebook.com/bajaanimalsanctuary/
View user's profile
Paco Facullo
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 976
Registered: 1-21-2017
Location: Here now
Member Is Offline

Mood: Abiding ..........

[*] posted on 8-20-2019 at 08:14 AM


Great story's from ya'll,,,,

I guess that's the thing about Baja and breaking down needing help. It brings out the good in people and the Mexican's that live there are some of the best !

Damn sure makes for great memories and stories.

Moose, Class move with bringing the mechanic the tools !

[Edited on 8-20-2019 by Paco Facullo]




Since I've given up all hope, I feel much better
View user's profile
thebajarunner
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3178
Registered: 9-8-2003
Location: Oakdale, CA
Member Is Offline

Mood: muy amable

[*] posted on 8-20-2019 at 04:48 PM


Changing a tire without a jack..... nothing to it.

We lost a jack somewhere in the midst of a Baja 500, then had a flat over south of Huerfenito.
(How the jack got left behind is a whole nother story)

You got to get off the hard road and get the wounded wheel on something fairly soft. Then you gather rocks and build a pyramid under the axle, and then you get the shovel and dig out under the flat until it is free. Quick change, then you have to get back on all 4.

If it is not on the drive wheels, just drive it off.
If it is on a drive axle, and you don't have a locker, then you have to fill your hole back with rocks, truck in neutral, and rock it back and forth until it drops.

All this while race minutes are ticking away.

Try it, it works.
View user's profile
mooose29
Nomad
**




Posts: 189
Registered: 10-1-2008
Location: Encinitas/Punta Chivato, Rancho Partera
Member Is Offline

Mood: All Smiles

[*] posted on 8-20-2019 at 11:34 PM


A break down of our own doing.

Pre running for the 500 many years ago in Dad’s Myers Towed. We left San Felipe in the morning and told the wives we would be back in the afternoon and don’t worry unless it gets dark.

A few miles past Mike’s Sky Rancho Dad takes an off camber left hand turn a bit too fast. I remember hanging on to the sissy bar for dear life while looking down the canyon to my right as the rear slides around and catches the ditch on the outside of the corner. The tire catches and we roll over 4-6 times about 50-75 feet down the canyon and miraculously we come to rest on our tires. The first couple of rolls were violent and man I wish we had those on video the last couple were like in super slow motion as the canyon pulled us further down.

We both looked at each other with eyes as big as dinner plates, ask if we are each ok and start unbuckling to survey the carnage. Dad had a small cut on his leg and I was unscathed. full roll cage, 5 point harnesses, helmets, and a lot of luck saved the day for both of us for sure. Wow

So now what we are miles from anywhere and down this fairly steep canyon. We climb up to the road and wait for some racers to come by. Lucky since this was a week or so before the race there were a fair amount of riders out and we didn’t have to wait long till a couple dudes on motorcycles came by.

They offered a ride and we decided Dad would ride to town to find help on the back of a bike and I would stay with the buggy.

I spent the first couple hours picking up tools and parts of buggy that had flown off during our crash. Then a hour or 2 sitting on the side of the road or in the buggy waiting and talking to passing riders/racers who universally all stopped to find out what happened and if I was OK. A lot of laughs and head shakes were had at our expense that day, and certainly deserved. Finally 4-5 in the afternoon Dad shows up with a hand full of racers in a pit truck I think it was a big Ford F-350 and we set about getting the buggy out of the canyon.

I think it was 3 or 4 tow straps linked together and that truck pulled us out easy. So now we are back on the road getting ready to tow back to town and Dad says wait why don’t we try and start it. Turn the key a little gas and that old 1960 something VW engine fires right up. But is making an awful noise which we quickly determine is the fan hitting a cowling that got all beat up so out come a hammer and pry bar and a couple minutes later no more racket. Lots of high fives head shakes and a few cold beers and we in on the road.

We get on the road the truck follows us to the highway we go right they go left. We had trailered to Mikes so we needed to get the buggy to the suburban/trailer we had left at Mikes.

All is good until the turn off for Mikes and a belt let lose and something else broke and we were dead literally at the turn off. So still miles from our ride and getting dark and we are stuck again. We start looking for a ride and along comes a rancher in an old beat to hell pickup and says jump in the back I’ll take you there. I sat in the back with a couple of goats as I recall.

We get the suburban and trailer then back to the buggy, wrestle the buggy on the trailer with a come along and we are on our way back to camp in San Felipe. It is now dark and I know the girls are gonna be worried as we said we would be back hours ago and we still have a couple hours to get back.

As we pull in to camp they are literally pulling out with several trucks of racers, friends, and family to come and rescue us. We had a lot of laughs and still do over that story that night. Although the wives were not amused for a while. This was before Spot, cell reception, etc... so we really had no way to letting them know we were OK.
View user's profile
wiltonh
Nomad
**


Avatar


Posts: 283
Registered: 2-2-2007
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-21-2019 at 03:40 PM


In 1998 I was flying to meet friends in La Paz. They were driving down with a trailer. When I got off the plane they told me the trailer was broken down at a camp at the edge of La Paz. The spindle had broken and the trailer stopped them on the pavement in front of the old RV camp next to the water. They got it into the first camp spot and waited for me to show up.

The trailer was made from an old Ford rear axle so I removed the remaining part and headed to the junk yard. All they had was a front plate with the steering arm connected. I told the guy that I needed the rear one not the front one and he got out his cutting torch and cut off the steering arm. He then ground the cut flat.

I stopped at a hardware and purchased a hand full of washers and put them behind the plate until it was as true as my eye could get it. They went South to our camping location and them back to Oregon in the spring. After 2000 miles that tire was worn off on one edge.

[Edited on 8-21-2019 by wiltonh]

[Edited on 8-22-2019 by wiltonh]
View user's profile
thebajarunner
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 3178
Registered: 9-8-2003
Location: Oakdale, CA
Member Is Offline

Mood: muy amable

[*] posted on 8-21-2019 at 03:52 PM


"Grabbing the sissy bar in a roll over" reminds me of the time that my partner Chuck was invited to pre-run for the 1000 with the Stroppe team.
Big Bill Rush, perennial 4 wheel drive champ, rolled his Bronco on the pre-run. It was an open rig with a full roll cage and he had a firm grip with his left hand on the roll bar. Left one finger behind. Not quite sure where you should put your hands in a rollover.
I remember that Danica Patrick used to let go of the wheel and put her hands in her lap when she wrecked (frequently) in IndyCar and NASCAR.
View user's profile
pniles
Newbie





Posts: 8
Registered: 6-27-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-22-2019 at 02:56 PM


It was November 1995 and a friend and I had just completed a kayak trip from Loreto to La Paz. Heading north my Isuzu Trooper transmission failed about 15 miles south of Vizcaino. My friend towed me to a tiny half open-air auto shop on Highway 1 on the south end of Vizcaino. The owner and mechanic, Esteban was a handsome and friendly bantam weight boxer looking character who adapted immediately to my present tense only Spanish. The next couple of days Esteban and some teen age “apprentices” tore the transmission down but soon decided they couldn’t fix it. I slept in the Trooper in the shop yard for the next week as plan B was developed, mostly by Esteban.

He managed to contact two or three different guys that could tow me to the border. But, after going to of all auto shops and stores, and numerous contacts in a facinating tour around town, a tow-bar could not be found anywhere. Esteban said he could build one with his (decrepit) arc welder but was out of acetylene needed to cut out some of the pieces. After a trip to Guerrero Negro to get acetylene for him, money for me, and groceries for his shy wife, he completed the tow bar in the next day or two. I was impressed with the result.

The first guy ready to tow me was scheduled to show up the next morning. He would not have been my first choice. He was a loud mouth duded out nightclub cowboy drunk I had met in the shop previously. But thankfully, in the evening, a regular around the shop, with one ear ring, who hadn’t weighed in before, said he would take my Trooper in the back of his enclosed tomato truck. I don’t remember, but maybe for as little as $200. In the dark we towed the Trooper out of town to a sand dune hump that with planks made a half ass loading ramp. With difficulty (and a subsequent medical issue) we loaded the Trooper, with the sea kayak next to it.

In the morning (?) after picking up a friend of his to accompany us, we headed for Tijuana. It was a slow (the overdrive was out) but entertaining trip, with lots of laughing, and music. That night the three of us “slept” sitting in the cab together huddled under my mummy bag, I think at Catavina. We got to Tijuana in the evening, found a flatbed tow truck that could go across the border, went through secondary, and me and my trooper were delivered to the curb in front of the San Diego Trooper dealer. It took another week for them to fix it. I think they had to have parts shipped in. I can’t remember any specifics about what failed, but I think the cause was an incorrect transmission oil that I had used.

The next year, after a bicycle trip from Santa Inez to the Santa Maria mission, I stopped to visit Esteban. It was an inopportune time. The shop was empty so I stepped into the weeping willow shaded yard connecting his shop to his house. I saw Esteban in a hammock in the shade, a blanket tossed over him. He recognized and welcomed me, and lifted the blanket to show me what looked like a Winchester 30-30 pointed in my direction, and pulling the blanket further showed me a long freshly healed scar across his chest. He of course had been waiting for someone other than me.

I quickly decided it wasn’t a good time to visit.

I don’t remember what more if anything he said about his immediate troubles. Hanging out at Esteban’s shop the previous year I had gathered that the crime scene in Vizcaino, both petty and major, was much larger than I had imagined for such a small town. In light of what I had learned then, I think Esteban was involved in some kind of factional dispute where problems are solved outside of the local police.

As I left Esteban told me that he had gotten a hernia when we loaded the Trooper into the truck, and that he subsequently crossed the border to get surgery done in Oregon where I think he had a brother. I had no doubt but that this was true.

The next year, 1997, on a surfing trip, I bought a red 220 Volt Lincoln Arc Welder in Ensenada, the ones that look like a large vintage am radio, and delivered it to Esteban as a small payment for the help he had given me. I haven’t been in touch with Esteban since then. Esteban is like so many people I have met in Baja that would give you the shirt off their back. Because of the sensitive nature of the above details I thought it best to avoid using Esteban’s real name in this story.

I think now that it would have been more efficient to have had my friend contract a flatbed wrecker in Tijuana to come down and get by me and the Trooper. I did not want my friend himself to have to tow me with a tow bar.

After more than 30 trips to Baja, what amazes me about this and similar edgy experiences is how alive and happy one can be during the experience, with a feeling of living to the fullest. At least as long as things turn out OK.
View user's profile
SFandH
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 5262
Registered: 8-5-2011
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-22-2019 at 03:04 PM


Good story. I too had to be towed out of Baja once. Multiple day fiasco, multiple tow trucks, playing it by ear. It actually worked out, one step at a time.



Want to adopt a mellow Baja dog or cat? - https://www.facebook.com/bajaanimalsanctuary/
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 57126
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 8-22-2019 at 04:42 PM


Dear pniles,
Your story is great and it sounds like you have more?
I would really enjoy reading about your bike ride to Mission Santa María and the kayak trip, too.
Nomads could really use some fresh blood!
Thank you and welcome aboard!




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

Baja Missions On Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/bajamissions/

Over 70 Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

Visit Viva Baja, to help you plan your next adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 30 (2018) Baja Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
pniles
Newbie





Posts: 8
Registered: 6-27-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-23-2019 at 11:06 PM


Thanks David.
Regarding the bike trip to Santa Maria, I think I can polish that off right here without making a new thread. The bike trip to the Santa Maria mission was a pretty minor achievement.

I had turned 60 and it was next on my Baja bucket list. I recall a vigorous and super satisfying, but easy, trip. I think it was 15 miles in. I didn’t know what to expect beyond the first mile or so, so had prepared waypoints on a topo so I wouldn’t get lost. On the way in from Santa Inez I talked to Schoonmacher (?) at his cabin (with his wrecked airplane in the yard; wrecked at the Santa Inez air strip after the thief was unprepared for the torque of his particular motor and on takeoff tipped sideways into the runway, or something like that). I don’t recall getting much insight as to the road to Santa Maria ahead, but he did seem somewhat concerned about my plan. I probably looked helpless, and he didn’t want to have to rescue me.

I wish I had asked him where to look for the petroglyphs. I looked for big horns but saw none.

I wore a regular backpack while riding the mountain bike. I walked with the backpack resting on the bike while I pushed it up hill or through loose sand. My gut recollection is the road up to the highest point was like riding on a of decomposed granite path through Joshua Tree park. Vehicles had clearly used the road so there was no chance of getting lost.

The part going down into the mission valley was very rough and bouldery. But not an issue so much when walking with a bike. But I do recall a part near the bottom with side by side gullies 2 or 3 ft deep going down a moderately steep slope. Hardly any flat road surface left, just ridges. Nothing could drive through there I said to myself--yet at the bottom, in the swampy area, I saw an old motorcycle track in the clay!

I have generally followed the Nomad coverage of Santa Maria trips for years, and never remember specifics, but see that I made a note about you (David K) going to the mission on a quad in 1999. Did you navigate the gullies, or did I imagine them? Were you there before 1997?

I slept in the open, inside the mission against the crumbled 2-ft high south side wall. I was awakened at about 10 pm by eight flashlight beams scanning my camp. An Mexican ecotourism group from Ensenada had walked down from the top, leaving behind something like a big-tire Suburban 4x4. I think they were intending to come part of the way down, but had broken something on the way in and only had two wheel drive, so got in late.

The eco group was great company and they invited me to join them at the world class oasis, a long walk downstream of the mission. That was a nice discovery.
View user's profile
pniles
Newbie





Posts: 8
Registered: 6-27-2006
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-23-2019 at 11:16 PM


The bike trip was in November, 1997.
View user's profile
David K
Honored Nomad
*********


Avatar


Posts: 57126
Registered: 8-30-2002
Location: San Diego County
Member Is Offline

Mood: Have Baja Fever

[*] posted on 8-24-2019 at 08:39 AM


Quote: Originally posted by pniles  
The bike trip was in November, 1997.


Very interesting!
My first time in was that quad ride in 1999 that you mentioned: http://www.vivabaja.com/missionsm/

It was my first return to Baja after a couple of dry years. It was after I got a computer and discovered there were other Baja nuts out there. I began my website with that trip.

My second time to Santa María was in my first Tacoma and traveled with two other Nomads/ Amigos, back in 2003 with my daughter: http://www.vivabaja.com/403/ We went to the petroglyphs. They are along the Indian trail (original El Camino Real) that drops into the canyon from the end of the bulldozed roadbed. Photos in this page.

My third time was in 2007, with my second Tacoma, my future wife 'Baja Angel,' and we traveled with Roy 'The squarecircle' and his lady Blanche. That was the trip we camped down at that oasis a mile past the mission and saw the bighorn sheep. http://vivabaja.com/msm/

My fourth and last time was in 2010 with my third Tacoma and a small group of Baja Nomads, it was great! http://vivabaja.com/msm2010/

At the peninsular divide (high point), 9.9 miles from Santa Ynez and 4.5 miles from the mission.

BajaTripper, Zully, CG, Baja Angel, Kurt G, Neal Johns, Baja Bucko, Art (edm1), Mia, HB Murphy, Zoom. Photo was taken by me, David K.

ROAD LOG
0.0 Rancho Santa Ynez, take road through left gate, north of ranch.
0.9 FORK, go left/ uphill.
1.8 Deep Gully, 4WD climb out (if this scares you, go back!).
2.4 Rock pile, a road to left, go straight/ right fork.
4.7 Cement monument off to left (tracks continue past monument).
5.6 Arroyo crossing with palms.
9.9 Peninsular Divide, view of Punta Final on the gulf.
13.3 Top of the 'Widowmaker' grade.
14.4 MISION SANTA MARIA
15.4 Road enters sandy Arroyo Santa Maria, after very steep downgrade. The oasis pool is up the arroyo, left here.
15.7 Turn left, out of arroyo (may be hidden by plants). Tracks ahead in arroyo end in 1/4 mile.
15.9 El Camino Real climbs to the left, up hillside. The mission trail stays out of the canyon, along the north ridge and returns to the arroyo at the east end of the canyon.
16.0 Roadbed washed out. Park and hike on to end of bulldozed grade to see petroglyphs, canyon view, Indian trail to canyon bottom.
[In 2010, large rocks prevented driving past Mile 15.5 so some of us hiked on to see the Camino Real and petroglyphs.]

[Edited on 8-24-2019 by David K]




"So Much Baja, So Little Time..."

Baja Missions On Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/bajamissions/

Over 70 Baja Bound Travel Adventure articles: https://www.bajabound.com/bajaadventures/bajatravel/

Visit Viva Baja, to help you plan your next adventure: http://VivaBaja.com

My 30 (2018) Baja Maps: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=88771
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Skipjack Joe
Select Nomad
*******




Posts: 7453
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Half Moon Bay
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-24-2019 at 03:54 PM


Whenever we broke down in Baja my ex would break down crying.
View user's profile
Lee
Ultra Nomad
*****


Avatar


Posts: 2700
Registered: 10-2-2006
Location: San Clemente, CA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-24-2019 at 09:09 PM


Looking for mechanics, any speciality, down South that can be added to the Mechanics in Baja thread, currently being viewed.

Name, speciality, location/landmark, number, if available.




US Marines: providing enemies of America an opportunity to die for their country since 1775.

God Bless Chesty Puller
View user's profile
 Pages:  1    3

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright � 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group�






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Ivan R. Misner, Ph.D

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262