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Author: Subject: Off Grid Construction: Advice Needed
RFClark
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 11:36 AM


Our Baja experience in passive cooling is different. There we built on top of a 30’ bluff behind the beach. The house is on the 2nd floor. Summer ground temperatures in our area 6’ down are about the same as the water temps so no cooling there.

What we did that works is use eves that shade the house in summer, paint the roof with heat reflective white paint backed up by R30 insulation and take advantage of the onshore breeze to keep the house cool. This works until the breeze stops, usually sometime in July. At night we get a reverse flow out to sea that keeps temperatures overnight in the 70s. It is known from sailing days that it’s much cooler in warm climates, 50’ - 100’ above deck!
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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 11:50 AM


Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
Our Baja experience in passive cooling is different. There we built on top of a 30’ bluff behind the beach. The house is on the 2nd floor. Summer ground temperatures in our area 6’ down are about the same as the water temps so no cooling there.

What we did that works is use eves that shade the house in summer, paint the roof with heat reflective white paint backed up by R30 insulation and take advantage of the onshore breeze to keep the house cool. This works until the breeze stops, usually sometime in July. At night we get a reverse flow out to sea that keeps temperatures overnight in the 70s. It is known from sailing days that it’s much cooler in warm climates, 50’ - 100’ above deck!


Thanks. Too late in construction for most of that now, but all sound eminently wise. I am told in our area onshore/offshore patterns have been disrupted and the breeze flows parallel to the beach almost all of the time. House layout originally took advantage of onshore/offshore reversals for natural airflow through the common areas, but as is, it seems the main wall including the garage will block most breezes. And so the high flow exhausting fans to draw from whichever side of the house is the coolest.
Am I correct in thinking you are in Todos Santos?

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by JDCanuck]
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RFClark
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 12:10 PM


The house I described is south of San Felipe, we built it 2003 - 2006 so we have good data on temps and electrical (solar) usage.

Where we are building now south of Cerritos there is cold water off shore through July. There is an on shore cool breeze with overnight temps in the 60s. As soon as the warm water arrives August - September the temps go into the 80s and the humidity goes up.

The white reflective roof makes a big difference in Mexico as does low thermal mass construction. The other thing that works is drawing in air from the center of that flat white roof as it’s usually colder than the surrounding air because of radiation to the sky if it’s clear.

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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 12:36 PM


Roof is white...contractor did that on his own. Solar panels are up there tho. Traditional brick construction throughout, no insulation. SentriGlas triple ply windows...lots of em, and front and rear sundecks with overhangs, one across front facing ocean and one in narrowed courtyard entrance way. I think the 40 by 40 courtyard will yield coolest temps for induced drafting, and this is where we will be planting the bushes (ciruela and bouganvillea and whatever will grow)lemon, banana, orange trees? Wife is big on edible plants

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by JDCanuck]

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by JDCanuck]
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 01:24 PM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Subsidized?
So who is paying cost of what you consume?

Tax pesos or the higher-tier consumers, have never investigated.

Before you jump on your judgemental high horse as usual, it's hardwired into the rate schedule, not some special individual subsidy.


I'm all for subsidized rates. I think I read someplace the average American uses 10 times the power that the average Mexican does. Gives the lower wage earners some basic power cheap and the power hogs can subsidize them with escalating use costs.

Lencho: I am amazed at your low power costs. Sounds great if you are willing to give up all those luxuries we are used to. Our combined power/gas bill up here for 4 people is costing us 250 USD per month, and is rising at about 15% per year recently. Water availability I think will be our big worry in BCS.

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by JDCanuck]

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by JDCanuck]
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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 02:30 PM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by JDCanuck  
I think I read someplace the average American uses 10 times the power that the average Mexican does. Gives the lower wage earners some basic power cheap and the power hogs can subsidize them with escalating use costs.

All that, and no less important if we're concerned about what we hand to future generations, it encourages energy conservation by rewarding low consumers directly where they care: their pocketbook.

I've lived in places where per-unit prices on limited resources DROP as use increases, a model which seems counter-productive in today's world.



Yeah, that's the model we have based our society on. Charge any poorer customers more to subsidize the high volume user. Financials, commodities, even food. Am i sounding like a socialist here?
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Don Pisto
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 02:43 PM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by JDCanuck  
I think I read someplace the average American uses 10 times the power that the average Mexican does. Gives the lower wage earners some basic power cheap and the power hogs can subsidize them with escalating use costs.

All that, and no less important if we're concerned about what we hand to future generations, it encourages energy conservation by rewarding low consumers directly where they care: their pocketbook.

I've lived in places where per-unit prices on limited resources DROP as use increases, a model which seems counter-productive in today's world.


I really believe the typical mexican family could save a bunch of much needed peso's if they just switched to LED's and turned off some appliances, it's not hard.

for years my CFE bill has been under five bucks a month.

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by Don Pisto]

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by Don Pisto]




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John Hiatt
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Don Pisto
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 09:37 PM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by Don Pisto  

I really believe the typical mexican family could save a bunch of much needed peso's if they just switched to LED's and turned off some appliances, it's not hard.

for years my CFE bill has been under five bucks a month

That's pretty low; do you run air conditioning at all? That's the big consumer for most Baja customers. Probably followed by their refrigerator.

That's assuming they cook and heat water with gas.


no AC.....just ease over to the left side;;)




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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 8-21-2021 at 10:11 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Don Pisto  
Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by JDCanuck  
I think I read someplace the average American uses 10 times the power that the average Mexican does. Gives the lower wage earners some basic power cheap and the power hogs can subsidize them with escalating use costs.

All that, and no less important if we're concerned about what we hand to future generations, it encourages energy conservation by rewarding low consumers directly where they care: their pocketbook.

I've lived in places where per-unit prices on limited resources DROP as use increases, a model which seems counter-productive in today's world.


I really believe the typical mexican family could save a bunch of much needed peso's if they just switched to LED's and turned off some appliances, it's not hard.

for years my CFE bill has been under five bucks a month.

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by Don Pisto]

[Edited on 8-21-2021 by Don Pisto]


I rented a place on the mainland and swapped the fluorescent that burnt out for an LED as the owner found them too expensive. 20 dollar LED bulb was way out of her budget range. For us, it's a minimal expense. I know...they are 1/4 that price here, must have been old stock, and was the only one that size in the store.

[Edited on 8-22-2021 by JDCanuck]
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