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Author: Subject: Let's talk about battery boosters
LancairDriver
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 11:18 AM


I keep a small one on my boat and have one in my diesel pickup also. I also carry a larger one to backup my 650hp diesel RV. They definitely provide some comfort level especially traveling in some of Baja’s more remote areas.
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KasloKid
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 12:06 PM


Quote: Originally posted by John Harper  
Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
My dad referred to the starter as a "pony motor".


That's what I heard them called. My friend's dad had a dozer that had one of those starter "pony" motors.

John

[Edited on 5-21-2020 by John Harper]


Pup or Pony, maybe a US vs Canada thing, eh?

Amazing how technology has changed the way we do things now...

I'm curious about the point made about "the more you do to them, the less they like it" more specifically, they don't like to be 100% charged???
I charged mine up to 100% every 3 months, even though I hadn't used it.. the led indicators would drop by 20% or so, so I'd charge it back to full. The next time frame of 3 months went by so it was time to charge it again, but the darn thing had swollen up a lot... not good news.
Would it be advisable to charge less often?
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pacificobob
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 12:39 PM


Yahama had diesel outboards that started on gasoline and then switched to diesel. I had a 40hp purchased in Honduras in the late 70s.
The fuel tank had 2 compartments a small one held the gasoline.
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chippy
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 02:16 PM


Quote: Originally posted by pacificobob  
Yahama had diesel outboards that started on gasoline and then switched to diesel. I had a 40hp purchased in Honduras in the late 70s.
The fuel tank had 2 compartments a small one held the gasoline.


I´ve never seen a diesel Yamaha outboard but I have seen Yanmar diesel outboards. I believe they are still being made today.
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John Harper
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 03:58 PM


I think the "pony" engine just turned over the higher compression diesel motor. Even compressing air in the diesel cylinders would heat up the motor, then you could add fuel and get it started. Probably the days before "glow plugs" to start a diesel.

John
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pacificobob
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 04:54 PM


Spark plugs...hmmm that was 40+ years ago. I can't remember what happened yesterday. Seems like it did. The provided fuel tank had about a 1 liter part for the gasoline. I do remember that they were always dirty looking from diesel.
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pacificobob
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[*] posted on 5-21-2020 at 05:05 PM


They are still available. Just not in the 1st world. Google Yamaha enduro.
They refer to them as kerosene burning, but they use diesel and other fuels I have used jetA, and JP5. long story.
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bent-rim
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[*] posted on 5-22-2020 at 09:57 AM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  

Never start a diesel with gasoline, things break!

Re BentRim's DT-18:

It was said at the time that there were two kinds of TD-18 – those that had cracked a head and those that were about to."


I remember him changing the heads on it. There were 2 of them 3 cylinders each and they had valves in them as I remember.
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Mulege Canuck
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[*] posted on 5-24-2020 at 08:15 AM


Boosters are great to get your truck started, but if your alternator goes your truck won’t run that long once it is started.

Since I have a camper, I have batteries and an inverter in the RV. I carry a battery charger. I can let the camper charge the truck battery. Once fully charged, your truck will run for quite a while without the alternator working if you don’t use the AC and keep the windows down.
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AKgringo
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[*] posted on 5-24-2020 at 08:38 AM


Quote: Originally posted by Mulege Canuck  
Boosters are great to get your truck started, but if your alternator goes your truck won’t run that long once it is started.

Since I have a camper, I have batteries and an inverter in the RV. I carry a battery charger. I can let the camper charge the truck battery. Once fully charged, your truck will run for quite a while without the alternator working if you don’t use the AC and keep the windows down.


It can go the other way as well. In February, the built in regulator in my Isuzu alternator failed, and cooked my battery to the point of destruction.

Fortunately for me, the grounds keeper/handyman at Campestre Maranatha in Chametla had the diagnostic tools and experience to find and fix the problem right in the camp!

AutoZone in La Paz delivered an alternator and battery, and I didn't even have to get my hands dirty.




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David K
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[*] posted on 5-24-2020 at 08:50 AM


Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
Quote: Originally posted by Mulege Canuck  
Boosters are great to get your truck started, but if your alternator goes your truck won’t run that long once it is started.

Since I have a camper, I have batteries and an inverter in the RV. I carry a battery charger. I can let the camper charge the truck battery. Once fully charged, your truck will run for quite a while without the alternator working if you don’t use the AC and keep the windows down.


It can go the other way as well. In February, the built in regulator in my Isuzu alternator failed, and cooked my battery to the point of destruction.

Fortunately for me, the grounds keeper/handyman at Campestre Maranatha in Chametla had the diagnostic tools and experience to find and fix the problem right in the camp!

AutoZone in La Paz delivered an alternator and battery, and I didn't even have to get my hands dirty.


Great story!




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[*] posted on 5-24-2020 at 05:28 PM


I have used a X-10 that was rated the best when I purchased 5 years ago. I love it.



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[*] posted on 5-26-2020 at 10:58 AM


I got a Interstate Branded Li ion battery booster a couple years ago. Worked great at first but last time I tried to use it the power died after less than a second of turning the engine over - and when these die, they die. I would carry a set of jumper cables and even a spare car battery in critical situations but great for charging up electronics

edit: lest I cause undue anxiety for those who depend on the lithium jump starters, all it needed was to be charged up and it worked fine again. These need to be recharged after every use and topped off regularly. Many rechargeable battery issues can be resolved by a good long charge-

I tried connecting it to an inverter, but the voltage coming out of the jump starter (15v) shut off the inverter, so in that sense a lead acid battery would be better.

[Edited on 5-27-2020 by bajaric]
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del mar
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[*] posted on 5-26-2020 at 12:14 PM


after a long and expensive stay in catavina waiting on parts we now carry an alternator along with the deep cycle battery we always carry. peace of mind!
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[*] posted on 5-26-2020 at 02:19 PM


I think of a battery booster as insurance. Not something I plan on using, but as a backup for emergency use.
Another form of "insurance" is dual batteries with an isolator switch.
Still another "insurance plan" is Priority Start. And a top-quality battery to begin with. https://www.odysseybattery.com/
Here's a re-post for those who are interested:

"Priority Start" device prevents dead battery
I've been using the Priority Start device for several years in two 4x4 vehicles.
They work as advertised and are cost-effective. It just occurred to me to post about it here, to save others from becoming stranded with a dead battery and a long walk for help.

The device is a "Low-Voltage Automatic Battery Disconnect Switch."
https://www.prioritystart.com/

Very simple to install. Price is a little over $100. Well worth it. Maybe save a few dollars on eBay "Buy It Now" w/ free shipping.
(And, no, I don't own stock in the company ;)

One installation minor suggestion: The giant "rubber band" (actually ethylene propylene terpolymer) may not be entirely adequate to hold the device firmly to the battery over several years. (At least, the way I drive off road). I linked a couple zip ties (aka plastic wire ties) and wrapped the circumference of the battery with the device. x2 for added security.
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PaulW
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[*] posted on 5-27-2020 at 06:26 AM


"Low-Voltage Automatic Battery Disconnect Switch."
https://www.prioritystart.com/
==== =
My new F150 come with electronic feature built in that does the same thing. Many new vehicles have the same feature. This is required for load shedding to keep the battery from discharging from parasite loads.
The Gladiator comes with unique a backup battery instead of a load shedding electronics. Yup is is a pretty small battery to keep the stuff alive while the start battery is isolated to keep it in its charged state. IMO, the Jeeps design is better than the Ford design.

Unlike a 'Jump Start" the "Priority Start" will not allow a bad battery to start your rig and it does not perform load shedding.
Just another gimmick to take your money.
However I endorse high capacity reliable batteries like https://www.odysseybattery.com/
Not a cheap battery.
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bajaric
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[*] posted on 5-27-2020 at 11:05 AM


On the late model f150's if the battery is low the first thing it does is inactivate the engine auto-shutoff (fuel saving function), then it starts showing a message that says "System off to save battery" so you have plenty of warning the battery needs replacement soon.

My 2016 also has dashboard tire pressure display all 4 tires and alarm if a flat is sensed. I don't know if airing down would set off the alarm because I never air down tires, generally my truck 2016 F150 is light and nimble on dirt roads, sand, not so much, so I just don't go there..
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[*] posted on 5-27-2020 at 11:09 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bajaric  
I don't know if airing down would set off the alarm because I never air down tires, generally my truck 2016 F150 is light and nimble on dirt roads, sand, not so much, so I just don't go there..


Airing down sets off a low pressure warning on my Silverado.

You should always air down in the dirt. The ride will be much smoother.


[Edited on 5-27-2020 by JZ]




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David K
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[*] posted on 5-27-2020 at 11:11 AM


Quote: Originally posted by bajaric  
On the late model f150's if the battery is low the first thing it does is inactivate the engine auto-shutoff (fuel saving function), then it starts showing a message that says "System off to save battery" so you have plenty of warning the battery needs replacement soon.

My 2016 also has dashboard tire pressure display all 4 tires and alarm if a flat is sensed. I don't know if airing down would set off the alarm because I never air down tires, generally my truck 2016 F150 is light and nimble on dirt roads, sand, not so much, so I just don't go there..


When I air down (to under 20 psi), the low pressure light comes on. I can reset it or just hope I don't get a flat while aired down. The warning light (when you are a street pressure), naturally means a tire is losing air if it comes on while driving. I have experienced that several times... and it is great because I have time to find a place to park and locate the puncture before the tire is really flat! Most times, I can repair the leak on the spot, no dismounting, no spare dropping, and refill with my pump. No problema amigos!




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[*] posted on 5-28-2020 at 05:39 AM


The low pressure warning is a good feature and I am glad it is required.
An example after leaving Baja we stop in a high elevation town for the night and the temperature gets low and I get a low pressure and have to top off all the tires.
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