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Author: Subject: Tabor/Steinbeck Canyon Hike
4x4abc
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[*] posted on 12-2-2021 at 06:58 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Bob and jane  
JZ, I've written a dozen replies to you in my head. Canon Mesquite is one place that's really specially to my husband and I. But I'll try objectivity. When we first started hiking there more than 20 years ago, the entrance was easier. The remains of an old seasonal hunting camp were still visible around the mesquite tree near the entrance. The pool below the waterfall was shallower and often a makeshift, homemade ladder was propped on the rock to the left of the waterfall and we could climb up to the floor of the canyon. Because the ladder wasn't reliably there, we always carried our extension ladder to use. The floor of the canyon was much sandier back then. Always a trickle of water, but none of the really deep pools there are now. In fact, we could wear tennis shoes. But carried sandals in case the water got ankle deep. We were able to go much further into the canyon. At one point it looked as if the canyon hit a deadend but when you reached the deadend, you would see a narrow slot canyon going off the the right. The high rock walls soon petered out. We would take a left up a side canyon and walk on slick rock. There was a huge boulder that looked as if it would roll over at any moment. Our walks ended in thick brush soon after that. Once we saw a mountain lion there and backed out slowly. I believe that a storm in about 2009 washed away the sand floor and created the deep cold pools that can make it difficult to get all the way back into the canyon now. And the same storm changed the entrance to the canyon. Now we had to scale the rock face to the right of the waterfall to get in. I always hyperventilated. I don't like high places. But always made it across. So proud of myself. We haven't gone into the canyon in several years now. We've been traveling some and the years have robbed us of some agility. The road to the canyon was a bit different every year. Sometimes we could drive all the way to the entrance and sometimes we had to park further away and walk. Arroyos are like that. All those years hiking there we rarely saw another person. Twice, I think, we ran into a group from the eco-resort by Ensenada Blanca. Usually the only sign of other humans was a random footprint in the mud. So amazing to be there. Last year we drove up to the canyon to check it out. First there is now a gravel operation as you enter the canyon. Then the old road. Then we were shocked when we parked the truck to walk to the entrance. We had to walk through a munchkin forest of those little rock towers that are all the rage now. There must have been hundreds of them!! Everywhere. It couldn't have hurt more if someone had written graffiti over the canyon walls. I'm so glad we knew the canyon when it could still feel a bit wild. Sorry, there went my objectivity.


so good to read from someone who knows

today much of what's supposed to be information - is just noise




Harald Pietschmann
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4x4abc
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[*] posted on 12-2-2021 at 07:20 PM


what I learned studying Camino Real is that it NEVER follows a water course
it is always on dry, high ground
almost always (some exceptions around Loreto)

so, to the left of the El Mezquite hunting camp is the start of a section of Camino Real
going up to Cuesta El Aguajito
from there to Mision San Javier

I have to clean up the track and will post it later

that Vulva looking crack is the beginning of Mezquite Cañon carrying Arroyo Ligüi

vulva.jpg - 178kB

[Edited on 12-3-2021 by 4x4abc]




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