BajaNomad

The palm tree is going two feet under water

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surabi - 7-7-2023 at 12:40 PM

One doesn't need to be a "professional" anything to have accurate knowledge about something, Goat.
You don't need to be a professional baker to know that if you set the oven to 500 degrees and put a tray of cookies in there for 15 minutes, they are going to burn.
You don't need to be a professional road engineer to know that dumping some sand in a pothole isn't going to "fix" the road.

Not an engineer, but I have been a Troll more than a few times...

AKgringo - 7-7-2023 at 01:50 PM

Not the kind that hang out here....I was the kind that hang out under bridges installing supports while traffic was driving overhead.

Probably a third of my career involved forming, pouring of modifying concrete structures. My favorite project was the Sea Life Center in Seward Alaska. It was very challenging and unusual configuration.

RFClark - 7-7-2023 at 02:35 PM

Goat,

In the NA court system an “expert” is a person who earns all or part of their income from the field they claim to be “expert” in.

I have built 3 houses in Mexico and done well financially from them. Based on that I qualify as an “expert” on building houses in Mexico.

I even did a lot of the work on the first 2 myself.

Different aspects of the construction process require different skills and skill levels. In the past a lot of the masters learned by starting at the bottom and working their way up. That’s how Mexico still works. Here you can be expert enough to build a complete one or two story home from scratch, requiring perhaps only an electrician to complete the process. The “engineering” part of that process hasn’t really changed much in 400 years.

Rebar and concrete block columns have replaced stone and mortar columns but it’s still an X - Y - Z frame carrying the load and the in-between filled with whatever blocks or in the old days rocks and rubble. Complete either with a coat of whatever including adobe mud and straw topped with Lime whitewash. Presto! A house!

An NA house is a rather different animal that most NAs take for granted until they come south and try to buy the same thing.

That’s the subject of a different post.

[Edited on 7-7-2023 by RFClark]

mtgoat666 - 7-7-2023 at 03:37 PM

All you “professionals” are very touchy!


mtgoat666 - 7-7-2023 at 03:45 PM

Getting back on topic…

Climate change is turning Hawaii into a giant cesspool—literally
https://fortune.com/2023/07/06/climate-change-is-turning-haw...

I wonder if Hawaiians measure sea level change using palm trees?

How northern Mexico became a climate migration destination
https://www.hcn.org/issues/55.7/south-climate-change-how-nor...



mtgoat666 - 7-7-2023 at 04:32 PM

More about experts:

Leonardo DiCaprio is the most trusted authority on the climate crisis — beating Greta Thunberg, Al Gore, and the Rock
https://www.businessinsider.com/leonardo-dicaprio-most-trust...

Dk, Clarkie and half pint did not make the list…

JZ - 7-7-2023 at 04:45 PM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
More about experts:

Leonardo DiCaprio is the most trusted authority on the climate crisis — beating Greta Thunberg, Al Gore, and the Rock
https://www.businessinsider.com/leonardo-dicaprio-most-trust...

Dk, Clarkie and half pint did not make the list…


Jtfc.. this is exactly why so many Millennials and Gen Z are so confused and bamboozled.




[Edited on 7-7-2023 by JZ]

mtgoat666 - 7-8-2023 at 09:28 AM

In Texas, Dead Fish and Red-Faced Desperation Are Signs of Things to Come

NYT, 7-8-23 By Jeff Goodell Mr. Goodell is the author of the forthcoming book, “The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet.”

In 2019, I happened to be visiting Phoenix on a 115-degree day. I had a meeting one afternoon about 10 blocks from the hotel where I was staying downtown. I gamely thought I’d brave the heat and walk to it. How bad could the heat really be? I grew up in California, not the Arctic. I thought I knew heat. I was wrong. After walking three blocks, I felt dizzy. After seven blocks, my heart was pounding. After 10 blocks, I thought I was a goner.

That experience led me to spend the next three years researching and reporting a book about the dangers of extreme heat and how rising temperatures are reshaping our world. I talked to doctors about how when the core temperature of our bodies rises too high, the proteins in our cells begin to unravel. I sailed to Antarctica to see how changes in ocean temperature accelerate the melting of glaciers, causing seas to rise and flooding coastal cities around the world. I talked to people in the slums of India and in oven-like apartments in Arizona and in stifling hot garrets in Paris. I trapped mosquitoes in Houston and learned about how the spread of dengue fever and malaria is altered by hotter temperatures. I talked to engineers about how heat bends railroad tracks and weakens bridges. In short, I thought I had a pretty good idea about the impacts of extreme heat in our world.

And then, in mid-June, a few weeks before publication of my book, a heat dome settled over the entire Southwest as well as Mexico, breaking temperature records and turning asphalt to mush. I had recently moved to Austin, Texas. Yes, Texas is a hot place. But this was different. We’re talking about a heat index — the combination of temperature and humidity — as high as 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Events disturbingly similar to what I had reported on in other places several years earlier were playing out in real time around me, like hikers dying of heatstroke and thousands of dead fish washing up on Gulf Coast beaches (hotter water contains less oxygen, making it difficult for fish to breathe). The red-faced desperation on the faces of homeless people living beneath an overpass near me was spookily evocative of the red-faced desperation I’d seen on the faces of people in India and Pakistan.

You can argue that Texas has done this to itself. The planet is getting hotter because of the burning of fossil fuels. This is a simple truth, as clear as the moon in the night sky. No state has profited more from fossil fuels than Texas. Revenues from oil and gas production have long been central to the Texas economy and are at least partly responsible for the more than $32 billion projected surplus in the state’s 2024-25 budget. And Texas is also responsible for emitting more than 600 million metric tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, more than twice as much as any other state.

The heat dome made visible the barbarity of the state’s political leadership. More workers die in Texas from high temperatures than anywhere else in the country. Nevertheless, on the very day when it was so hot that I didn’t want to walk outside to check the mail until after dark, Gov. Greg Abbott gave final approval to a law that will eliminate local ordinances requiring water breaks for construction workers. Despite the state’s massive budget surplus, many Texas prisons remain without air-conditioning, turning cells into torture chambers on hot days.

If you are lucky enough and well-off enough, perhaps there is no sense that a life-threatening force has invaded your world. This past week, records were set or tied on four consecutive days as the hottest days ever recorded on Earth. On Monday, I happened to be sitting in an air-conditioned cafe in Austin. Around me, people drank iced coffees and bottled water, seemingly unconcerned as the heat outside beat down mercilessly. In my neighborhood, where a couple tore down a modest house, cut down big shady trees and erected a McMansion with a black roof that sucks up heat, massive compressors for the air-conditioning hang off the side of the house like tactical weapons in the climate war.

In some ways, Mr. Abbott’s callousness is not surprising. Many Texans see extreme heat as a feeble foe. At the height of the Texas heat wave, the official Twitter account for a Texas university football team featured a video of a fully suited player running sprints while dragging a heavy chain. “Working in that Texas heat,” the tweet boasted, followed by a fire emoji. Like risking your life in the heat makes you a real cowboy.

Not far from my house is a gym called “HEAT Bootcamp” (the gym’s marketing pitch: “Join the heat wave”). Here, enduring heat is a sign of inner strength (a throwback to medieval times, perhaps, when heat was linked to masculinity through what the philosopher Thomas Aquinas called “the elemental heat of the semen”).

Fortunately, despite high demand for electricity from everyone cranking their A.C., the Texas grid has held steady, largely because of the enormous number of solar panels that have come online in Texas in recent years. People have flocked to Austin’s green spaces, especially the spring-fed Barton Springs pool, proving the value of cool public spaces. At the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin (where my wife is the director) a hot, lifeless courtyard has been transformed into a shady, welcoming patio by the installation of a dozen elegant 40-foot-high structures in the shape of flower petals — proof, if such proof is needed, that a cool city can be a beautiful city.

Among climate activists and others concerned about the future of the planet, there is a lot of talk now about the need for inspiring stories and hopeful solutions. I agree. We are not doomed. In fact, I think the climate crisis is, above all else, an opportunity to change how we think about our relationship with nature and build a happier, healthier, more just world.

But living under the Texas heat dome has reinforced my view that we have to be cleareyed about the scope and scale of what we are facing. The extreme heat that is cooking many parts of the world this summer is not a freakish event — it is another step into our burning future. The wildfires in Canada, the orange Blade Runner skies on the East Coast, the hot ocean, the rapidly melting glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica and the Himalayas, the high price of food, the spread of vector-borne diseases in unexpected places — it is all connected, and it is all driven by rising heat.

We need to start seeing hot days as more than an invitation to go to the beach or hang out at the lake. Extreme heat is the engine of planetary chaos. We ignore it at our peril. Because if there is one thing we should understand about the risks of extreme heat, it is this: All living things, from humans to hummingbirds, share one simple fate. If the temperature they’re used to — what scientists sometimes call their Goldilocks Zone — rises too far, too fast, they die.





[Edited on 7-8-2023 by mtgoat666]

mtgoat666 - 7-8-2023 at 12:08 PM




RFClark - 7-8-2023 at 12:16 PM

Goat,

She certainly walks the walk better than Kerry, she’s smarter too!

JZ - 7-8-2023 at 03:27 PM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  



Why are you sexually objectifying her?


pacificobob - 7-9-2023 at 08:30 AM

Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
Not the kind that hang out here....I was the kind that hang out under bridges installing supports while traffic was driving overhead.

Probably a third of my career involved forming, pouring of modifying concrete structures. My favorite project was the Sea Life Center in Seward Alaska. It was very challenging and unusual configuration.


And, a job well done. The Seward sea life center is a credit to Alaska.

surabi - 7-9-2023 at 10:01 AM



image.png.e08de4b45b1b4291a247a529c88d2842.png - 260kB

[Edited on 7-9-2023 by surabi]

image.png.e08de4b45b1b4291a247a529c88d2842.png - 260kB

RFClark - 7-10-2023 at 08:44 AM

A Climate Scientist who makes sense on dealing with climate change.

From nuclear power to electric vehicles, battles between activists risk getting in the way of reducing emissions

https://apple.news/Afil_kN4-Sjy4VaRVoGP8hQ

Barry A. - 7-12-2023 at 04:15 PM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
In Texas, Dead Fish and Red-Faced Desperation Are Signs of Things to Come

NYT, 7-8-23 By Jeff Goodell Mr. Goodell is the author of the forthcoming book, “The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet.”

In 2019, I happened to be visiting Phoenix on a 115-degree day. I had a meeting one afternoon about 10 blocks from the hotel where I was staying downtown. I gamely thought I’d brave the heat and walk to it. How bad could the heat really be? I grew up in California, not the Arctic. I thought I knew heat. I was wrong. After walking three blocks, I felt dizzy. After seven blocks, my heart was pounding. After 10 blocks, I thought I was a goner.

That experience led me to spend the next three years researching and reporting a book about the dangers of extreme heat and how rising temperatures are reshaping our world. I talked to doctors about how when the core temperature of our bodies rises too high, the proteins in our cells begin to unravel. I sailed to Antarctica to see how changes in ocean temperature accelerate the melting of glaciers, causing seas to rise and flooding coastal cities around the world. I talked to people in the slums of India and in oven-like apartments in Arizona and in stifling hot garrets in Paris. I trapped mosquitoes in Houston and learned about how the spread of dengue fever and malaria is altered by hotter temperatures. I talked to engineers about how heat bends railroad tracks and weakens bridges. In short, I thought I had a pretty good idea about the impacts of extreme heat in our world.

And then, in mid-June, a few weeks before publication of my book, a heat dome settled over the entire Southwest as well as Mexico, breaking temperature records and turning asphalt to mush. I had recently moved to Austin, Texas. Yes, Texas is a hot place. But this was different. We’re talking about a heat index — the combination of temperature and humidity — as high as 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Events disturbingly similar to what I had reported on in other places several years earlier were playing out in real time around me, like hikers dying of heatstroke and thousands of dead fish washing up on Gulf Coast beaches (hotter water contains less oxygen, making it difficult for fish to breathe). The red-faced desperation on the faces of homeless people living beneath an overpass near me was spookily evocative of the red-faced desperation I’d seen on the faces of people in India and Pakistan.

You can argue that Texas has done this to itself. The planet is getting hotter because of the burning of fossil fuels. This is a simple truth, as clear as the moon in the night sky. No state has profited more from fossil fuels than Texas. Revenues from oil and gas production have long been central to the Texas economy and are at least partly responsible for the more than $32 billion projected surplus in the state’s 2024-25 budget. And Texas is also responsible for emitting more than 600 million metric tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, more than twice as much as any other state.

The heat dome made visible the barbarity of the state’s political leadership. More workers die in Texas from high temperatures than anywhere else in the country. Nevertheless, on the very day when it was so hot that I didn’t want to walk outside to check the mail until after dark, Gov. Greg Abbott gave final approval to a law that will eliminate local ordinances requiring water breaks for construction workers. Despite the state’s massive budget surplus, many Texas prisons remain without air-conditioning, turning cells into torture chambers on hot days.

If you are lucky enough and well-off enough, perhaps there is no sense that a life-threatening force has invaded your world. This past week, records were set or tied on four consecutive days as the hottest days ever recorded on Earth. On Monday, I happened to be sitting in an air-conditioned cafe in Austin. Around me, people drank iced coffees and bottled water, seemingly unconcerned as the heat outside beat down mercilessly. In my neighborhood, where a couple tore down a modest house, cut down big shady trees and erected a McMansion with a black roof that sucks up heat, massive compressors for the air-conditioning hang off the side of the house like tactical weapons in the climate war.

In some ways, Mr. Abbott’s callousness is not surprising. Many Texans see extreme heat as a feeble foe. At the height of the Texas heat wave, the official Twitter account for a Texas university football team featured a video of a fully suited player running sprints while dragging a heavy chain. “Working in that Texas heat,” the tweet boasted, followed by a fire emoji. Like risking your life in the heat makes you a real cowboy.

Not far from my house is a gym called “HEAT Bootcamp” (the gym’s marketing pitch: “Join the heat wave”). Here, enduring heat is a sign of inner strength (a throwback to medieval times, perhaps, when heat was linked to masculinity through what the philosopher Thomas Aquinas called “the elemental heat of the semen”).

Fortunately, despite high demand for electricity from everyone cranking their A.C., the Texas grid has held steady, largely because of the enormous number of solar panels that have come online in Texas in recent years. People have flocked to Austin’s green spaces, especially the spring-fed Barton Springs pool, proving the value of cool public spaces. At the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin (where my wife is the director) a hot, lifeless courtyard has been transformed into a shady, welcoming patio by the installation of a dozen elegant 40-foot-high structures in the shape of flower petals — proof, if such proof is needed, that a cool city can be a beautiful city.

Among climate activists and others concerned about the future of the planet, there is a lot of talk now about the need for inspiring stories and hopeful solutions. I agree. We are not doomed. In fact, I think the climate crisis is, above all else, an opportunity to change how we think about our relationship with nature and build a happier, healthier, more just world.

But living under the Texas heat dome has reinforced my view that we have to be cleareyed about the scope and scale of what we are facing. The extreme heat that is cooking many parts of the world this summer is not a freakish event — it is another step into our burning future. The wildfires in Canada, the orange Blade Runner skies on the East Coast, the hot ocean, the rapidly melting glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica and the Himalayas, the high price of food, the spread of vector-borne diseases in unexpected places — it is all connected, and it is all driven by rising heat.

We need to start seeing hot days as more than an invitation to go to the beach or hang out at the lake. Extreme heat is the engine of planetary chaos. We ignore it at our peril. Because if there is one thing we should understand about the risks of extreme heat, it is this: All living things, from humans to hummingbirds, share one simple fate. If the temperature they’re used to — what scientists sometimes call their Goldilocks Zone — rises too far, too fast, they die.





[Edited on 7-8-2023 by mtgoat666]



Goatly-----------I and my Family lived in El Centro,CA for 13 years, and then Redding, CA for the past 32 years. We often get, and got, summer temps well above 110 in Summer in both places for many months each year. Hot, yes, but I never remember hearing that people were dying strictly due to the heat, and we were often "out in the heat" so maybe a bit of exaggeration in your posting here???

Barry A.



mtgoat666 - 7-12-2023 at 05:05 PM

Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
In Texas, Dead Fish and Red-Faced Desperation Are Signs of Things to Come

NYT, 7-8-23 By Jeff Goodell Mr. Goodell is the author of the forthcoming book, “The Heat Will Kill You First: Life and Death on a Scorched Planet.”

In 2019, I happened to be visiting Phoenix on a 115-degree day. I had a meeting one afternoon about 10 blocks from the hotel where I was staying downtown. I gamely thought I’d brave the heat and walk to it. How bad could the heat really be? I grew up in California, not the Arctic. I thought I knew heat. I was wrong. After walking three blocks, I felt dizzy. After seven blocks, my heart was pounding. After 10 blocks, I thought I was a goner.

That experience led me to spend the next three years researching and reporting a book about the dangers of extreme heat and how rising temperatures are reshaping our world. I talked to doctors about how when the core temperature of our bodies rises too high, the proteins in our cells begin to unravel. I sailed to Antarctica to see how changes in ocean temperature accelerate the melting of glaciers, causing seas to rise and flooding coastal cities around the world. I talked to people in the slums of India and in oven-like apartments in Arizona and in stifling hot garrets in Paris. I trapped mosquitoes in Houston and learned about how the spread of dengue fever and malaria is altered by hotter temperatures. I talked to engineers about how heat bends railroad tracks and weakens bridges. In short, I thought I had a pretty good idea about the impacts of extreme heat in our world.

And then, in mid-June, a few weeks before publication of my book, a heat dome settled over the entire Southwest as well as Mexico, breaking temperature records and turning asphalt to mush. I had recently moved to Austin, Texas. Yes, Texas is a hot place. But this was different. We’re talking about a heat index — the combination of temperature and humidity — as high as 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Events disturbingly similar to what I had reported on in other places several years earlier were playing out in real time around me, like hikers dying of heatstroke and thousands of dead fish washing up on Gulf Coast beaches (hotter water contains less oxygen, making it difficult for fish to breathe). The red-faced desperation on the faces of homeless people living beneath an overpass near me was spookily evocative of the red-faced desperation I’d seen on the faces of people in India and Pakistan.

You can argue that Texas has done this to itself. The planet is getting hotter because of the burning of fossil fuels. This is a simple truth, as clear as the moon in the night sky. No state has profited more from fossil fuels than Texas. Revenues from oil and gas production have long been central to the Texas economy and are at least partly responsible for the more than $32 billion projected surplus in the state’s 2024-25 budget. And Texas is also responsible for emitting more than 600 million metric tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, more than twice as much as any other state.

The heat dome made visible the barbarity of the state’s political leadership. More workers die in Texas from high temperatures than anywhere else in the country. Nevertheless, on the very day when it was so hot that I didn’t want to walk outside to check the mail until after dark, Gov. Greg Abbott gave final approval to a law that will eliminate local ordinances requiring water breaks for construction workers. Despite the state’s massive budget surplus, many Texas prisons remain without air-conditioning, turning cells into torture chambers on hot days.

If you are lucky enough and well-off enough, perhaps there is no sense that a life-threatening force has invaded your world. This past week, records were set or tied on four consecutive days as the hottest days ever recorded on Earth. On Monday, I happened to be sitting in an air-conditioned cafe in Austin. Around me, people drank iced coffees and bottled water, seemingly unconcerned as the heat outside beat down mercilessly. In my neighborhood, where a couple tore down a modest house, cut down big shady trees and erected a McMansion with a black roof that sucks up heat, massive compressors for the air-conditioning hang off the side of the house like tactical weapons in the climate war.

In some ways, Mr. Abbott’s callousness is not surprising. Many Texans see extreme heat as a feeble foe. At the height of the Texas heat wave, the official Twitter account for a Texas university football team featured a video of a fully suited player running sprints while dragging a heavy chain. “Working in that Texas heat,” the tweet boasted, followed by a fire emoji. Like risking your life in the heat makes you a real cowboy.

Not far from my house is a gym called “HEAT Bootcamp” (the gym’s marketing pitch: “Join the heat wave”). Here, enduring heat is a sign of inner strength (a throwback to medieval times, perhaps, when heat was linked to masculinity through what the philosopher Thomas Aquinas called “the elemental heat of the semen”).

Fortunately, despite high demand for electricity from everyone cranking their A.C., the Texas grid has held steady, largely because of the enormous number of solar panels that have come online in Texas in recent years. People have flocked to Austin’s green spaces, especially the spring-fed Barton Springs pool, proving the value of cool public spaces. At the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin (where my wife is the director) a hot, lifeless courtyard has been transformed into a shady, welcoming patio by the installation of a dozen elegant 40-foot-high structures in the shape of flower petals — proof, if such proof is needed, that a cool city can be a beautiful city.

Among climate activists and others concerned about the future of the planet, there is a lot of talk now about the need for inspiring stories and hopeful solutions. I agree. We are not doomed. In fact, I think the climate crisis is, above all else, an opportunity to change how we think about our relationship with nature and build a happier, healthier, more just world.

But living under the Texas heat dome has reinforced my view that we have to be cleareyed about the scope and scale of what we are facing. The extreme heat that is cooking many parts of the world this summer is not a freakish event — it is another step into our burning future. The wildfires in Canada, the orange Blade Runner skies on the East Coast, the hot ocean, the rapidly melting glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica and the Himalayas, the high price of food, the spread of vector-borne diseases in unexpected places — it is all connected, and it is all driven by rising heat.

We need to start seeing hot days as more than an invitation to go to the beach or hang out at the lake. Extreme heat is the engine of planetary chaos. We ignore it at our peril. Because if there is one thing we should understand about the risks of extreme heat, it is this: All living things, from humans to hummingbirds, share one simple fate. If the temperature they’re used to — what scientists sometimes call their Goldilocks Zone — rises too far, too fast, they die.





[Edited on 7-8-2023 by mtgoat666]



Goatly-----------I and my Family lived in El Centro,CA for 13 years, and then Redding, CA for the past 32 years. We often get, and got, summer temps well above 110 in Summer in both places for many months each year. Hot, yes, but I never remember hearing that people were dying strictly due to the heat, and we were often "out in the heat" so maybe a bit of exaggeration in your posting here???

Barry A.




I have run crews in mojave in summer, heat exhaustion/heat stroke is real.
120 or 125 kills people that are unhealthy or unprepared

[Edited on 7-13-2023 by mtgoat666]

willardguy - 7-12-2023 at 05:55 PM

90 degree water in Florida right now in the middle of July….could the “perfect Storm” be coming! 😟

surabi - 7-12-2023 at 07:05 PM

Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  










Goatly-----------I and my Family lived in El Centro,CA for 13 years, and then Redding, CA for the past 32 years. We often get, and got, summer temps well above 110 in Summer in both places for many months each year. Hot, yes, but I never remember hearing that people were dying strictly due to the heat, and we were often "out in the heat" so maybe a bit of exaggeration in your posting here???

Barry A.




Yet another person who thinks their personal anecdotal experience is somehow relevant to climate and medical science.

Barry A. - 7-12-2023 at 07:22 PM

Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  










Goatly-----------I and my Family lived in El Centro,CA for 13 years, and then Redding, CA for the past 32 years. We often get, and got, summer temps well above 110 in Summer in both places for many months each year. Hot, yes, but I never remember hearing that people were dying strictly due to the heat, and we were often "out in the heat" so maybe a bit of exaggeration in your posting here???

Barry A.




Yet another person who thinks their personal anecdotal experience is somehow relevant to climate and medical science.



LOL------------Well, personal experience IS my main point of reference, I admit. However, I did have a minor in Meteorology and Climatology from San Diego State, way back when.



Barry A. - 7-12-2023 at 07:27 PM

Goat----------Yes indeed, you are right. "120 to 125" are Death Valley type temps. in the extreme and are very dangerous. As a Ranger I worked outside most of my adult life and was very careful.

Barry

surabi - 7-12-2023 at 07:47 PM

Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  


However, I did have a minor in Meteorology and Climatology from San Diego State, way back when.




Well, good thing you didn't decide to become a TV weatherman and dare to try to educate viewers about climate change. They get death threats now.

https://www.npr.org/2023/06/27/1184461263/iowa-meteorologist...


[Edited on 7-13-2023 by surabi]

RFClark - 7-12-2023 at 08:23 PM

Barry,

Surabi is a true “Climate Change Believer” nothing you or anyone says, no new papers published or Snow in July will change her belief that “The Experts” have spoken, debate and research on the subject is closed.

She overlooks the historical truth that for every landmark change in science or medicine a majority of the “Experts” initially were on the wrong side of the argument. Change towards the truer facts is always started and led by a few who stake their careers on inducing change in the face of orthodoxy! Generally they are not thanked, often quite the opposite!

Number of exclamation points - 1

Don Pisto - 7-12-2023 at 08:33 PM

Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
Barry,

Surabi is a true “Climate Change Believer” nothing you or anyone says, no new papers published or Snow in July will change her belief that “The Experts” have spoken, debate and research on the subject is closed.

She overlooks the historical truth that for every landmark change in science or medicine a majority of the “Experts” initially were on the wrong side of the argument. Change towards the truer facts is always started and led by a few who stake their careers on inducing change in the face of orthodoxy! Generally they are not thanked, often quite the opposite!

Number of exclamation points - 1




which one doesn't count:?:

surabi - 7-12-2023 at 10:15 PM

Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
Barry,

Surabi is a true “Climate Change Believer”...



"Climate Change Believer"??? :lol:
Sorry to burst your bubble, but it isn't a religious dogma that has "believers". Listening to what thousands of scientists who are educated and experienced in their field have to say is called informing and educating oneself.
And snow in July in the northern hemisphere happens to give credence to rapidly accelerating man-made climate change. You still apparently don't understand the concept of climate change and global warming.

[Edited on 7-13-2023 by surabi]

JZ - 7-12-2023 at 10:20 PM

Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
Barry,

Surabi is a true “Climate Change Believer”...



"Climate Change Believer"??? :lol:
Sorry to burst your bubble, but it isn't a religious dogma that has "believers". Listening to what thousands of scientists who are educated and experienced in their field have to say is called informing and educating oneself.


It most definitely is a religion/cult.

surabi - 7-12-2023 at 10:26 PM

Quote: Originally posted by JZ  


It most definitely is a religion/cult.


You obviously have no idea what the definition of "religion" and "cult" mean. Try using a dictionary sometime.

SFandH - 7-13-2023 at 09:43 AM

Quote: Originally posted by pacificobob  
Google insurance companies stampeding to leave the Florida market.
Dozens of major players in that industry have concluded the risk has become intolerable.


Current water temps around Florida are 5 degrees warmer than normal. More heat energy for the inevitable summer hurricanes to absorb and unleash when they hit land.

https://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/2023/07/10/florida...

Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisana, Texas are all in the crosshairs.

pacificobob - 7-13-2023 at 11:42 AM

Faith = the irrational believe in the highly improbable.

surabi - 7-13-2023 at 12:33 PM

Quote: Originally posted by pacificobob  
Faith = the irrational believe in the highly improbable.


Many people have irrational beliefs. The important thing is whether they are able to admit, "Yes, I know there's no rational, scientific proof for my beliefs, but I choose to believe it anyway", or the opposite.

My dad, who was an atheist and a scientist, used to cut off the end of a loaf of bread and throw it away because his Russian Jewish mother used to do that, saying it let the evil spirits out. He totally acknowledged that it was a baseless superstition, but it was so ingrained deep in him from the time he was a small child that he did it irrationally anyway.

I had a friend who had serious medical issues in the early months of a pregnancy. The recommendation was for an abortion, as both her life and the life of the fetus were in danger if she continued.
She had a really hard time making the decision, because she was raised Catholic, and it was drilled into her from early childhood that abortion was a sin. She no longer rationally believed in any of that, didn't think she'd go to hell, or even that there such a place existed, but said she was so indoctrinated that what should have been a no brainer decision to terminate the pregnancy was difficult. (She did terminate and didn't regret it)

RFClark - 7-13-2023 at 12:50 PM

PB,

Belief in what seems “highly improbable” (at the time) You mean like continents moving or heaver than air things flying or a particle being in two places at the same time?

The established scientific community had “faith” that all of those things were impossible before they changed their minds,

surabi - 7-13-2023 at 01:38 PM

No, RF, as pointed out, "faith" is believing in something for which there is no rational basis. Scientists believe things are true, or might be true, based on the information that is available to them at the time. As new information becomes available, and new scientific methods developed, those conclusions often change.

That has nothing to do with belief in something based on nothing but the fact that you choose to believe it.

RFClark - 7-13-2023 at 04:45 PM

S,

Still don’t get the point. The folks in charge cling to their incorrect ideas (beliefs) until new ones are jammed down their throats or they die!

The point is cutting off discussion because the”authorities” have concluded they have the only answer required be it climate or COVID is not only intellectually dishonest, it will be the only time they got it right on the first try.

Exclimation points - 1

RFClark - 7-13-2023 at 05:07 PM

S and goat

A number of people with Phd after their names have put forward the theory that we are living in a simulation. That would make whatever is running the sim God. Then there are the multiverse people.

Atheists, on the other hand believe that there is/are no God(s), but can offer no proof to support their beliefs. They get very touchy when asked for some, as a rule.

AKgringo - 7-13-2023 at 05:19 PM

Politics and religion should be discussed while sitting under the palm trees watching the rising tide! :D

surabi - 7-13-2023 at 05:22 PM

You have no idea how ridiculous you sound, RF. Beliefs, not based on facts, are by their very nature unprovable.
Believers in God cannot prove there is such a thing as God, nor can atheists prove there isn't.

"The folks in charge cling to their incorrect ideas (beliefs) until new ones are jammed down their throats or they die!"

Which "folks in charge"? Plenty of people in positions of authority are open to considering new ideas and admitting they may have been wrong about something.

[Edited on 7-14-2023 by surabi]

RFClark - 7-13-2023 at 05:30 PM

“Say Goodnight Gracey”.

Almost - 7-13-2023 at 07:35 PM

Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
Politics and religion should be discussed while sitting under the palm trees watching the rising tide! :D

Amen, with a couple bottles of cheap mezcal laying around your feet...

mtgoat666 - 7-14-2023 at 08:55 AM

A weekslong heat wave will intensify this weekend and push temperatures close to 130 degrees

Climate crisis getting worse! Parts of SW to be unfit for humans!

https://www.cnn.com/2023/07/14/weather/heat-wave-phoenix-cal...

I am going to stay in CA coastal area, in next decade expect interior USA to be uninhabitable in summer.

Is AZ and TX exodus underway?

[Edited on 7-14-2023 by mtgoat666]

RFClark - 7-14-2023 at 09:19 AM

Goat,

Phoenix was uninhabitable in the ‘50s. They grow lawns under water there!

monoloco - 7-15-2023 at 05:49 AM

Interesting article on rising sea level.
https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2023/07/how-fast-are-the-...

mtgoat666 - 7-15-2023 at 07:27 AM

The sw usa heat wave is here. Hot enough for you?

I see phoenix will be 117 high, and low of 96.

Sounds horrible


[Edited on 7-15-2023 by mtgoat666]

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 08:05 AM

goat,


Sorry, the lows in Phoenix this morning were in the low 80’s and even a few high 70’s I looked at 6:00.

SD had lows in the low 60’s

Imperial valley in the low 80’s

Don’t believe everything you see on the web!

mtgoat666 - 7-15-2023 at 08:11 AM

Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
goat,


Sorry, the lows in Phoenix this morning were in the low 80’s and even a few high 70’s I looked at 6:00.

SD had lows in the low 60’s

Imperial valley in the low 80’s

Don’t believe everything you see on the web!


Clarkie:
Nws forecast discussion today…

The high temperature in Phoenix on Friday topped out at 116 degrees,
tying the record for the date set back in 2003. Going through this
weekend, temperature records will continue to be in jeopardy. The
latest NBM shows today being the hottest day this weekend with a
forecast high of 118 degrees and even a ~20% chance of 120 degrees.
Additionally, low temperatures are forecast to only fall into the
low to mid 90s in Phoenix each morning, providing little relief from
the heat. Phoenix has already seen 5 consecutive days with lows at
or above 90 degrees. The all-time record for Phoenix is 7 days, so
we are likely to break the record Monday. The number of consecutive
days at or above 110 degrees with this heat wave is also likely to
break the record of 18 days set back in 1974 next Tuesday.
Temperatures of this magnitude is not your "typical desert heat" but
rather very dangerous heat that should be treated seriously. Extreme
HeatRisk will increase across the lower deserts today and persist
into next week, posing a risk to everyone for the potential of
seeing heat-related health impacts. The strong ridge of high
pressure will shift further eastward toward the Arizona/New Mexico
border, but this will do little to provide relief from the heat wave
with excessive heat persisting. NBM keeps daytime highs across the
lower deserts near or above 115 degrees for most locations through
the first part of next week. An Excessive Heat Warning remains in
effect for the entire area through the weekend with most areas
remaining under the warning through Wednesday.

JZ - 7-15-2023 at 08:36 AM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
The sw usa heat wave is here. Hot enough for you?

I see phoenix will be 117 high, and low of 96.

Sounds horrible


[Edited on 7-15-2023 by mtgoat666]


Where were you when Vegas went a record 291 days without hitting 100?

When we have bizzards in Ohio this winter are you gonna say the glaciers are coming for us?

surabi - 7-15-2023 at 08:55 AM

It's rather amusing seeing you guys tie yourself in knots with irrelevant stuff, trying to deny what is happening. I really am bamboozled at what you get out if it.

JZ - 7-15-2023 at 09:40 AM

Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
It's rather amusing seeing you guys tie yourself in knots with irrelevant stuff, trying to deny what is happening. I really am bamboozled at what you get out if it.


Nothing we do is going to impact CC. The only thing that will happen is ppl will give up their freedoms and $'s and other ppl will get rich and fly around on private jets to their 10 houses.


[Edited on 7-15-2023 by JZ]

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 09:48 AM

S,

https://yaleclimateconnections.org/2023/07/how-fast-are-the-...

Try reading all of this! There are problems with the sea level rise forecasts. They are either too high or too low. Depending on the unknowable.

When the rich private jet flying climate people sell their jets, gas hog SUVs and beach front estates it will give some credibility to what they are saying.

Note that to date they have not done so!

Exclimation points - 2

[Edited on 7-15-2023 by RFClark]

JZ - 7-15-2023 at 09:56 AM

#Climate Hypocrisy


'Teresa Ribera, the Spanish Minister for Ecological Transition, pulled up to a July 10th Valladolid “informal ministerial meeting” climate summit in the most ecologically friendly way possible: On a bicycle.

Except, her woman-powered mode of transportation was only for the last 100 meters of her journey. The first 180 miles were traveled car.

The entire stunt feels like something out of an episode of Veep.

"They could just Skype," another commenter pointed out. "But then how would the back door deals happen?"'



Some even say she flew a private jet there. Watch the video of the ridiculous woman riding a bike the last 100 meters as multiple gas powered cars guide her. These are the ridiculous ppl so many are following?


[Edited on 7-15-2023 by JZ]

surabi - 7-15-2023 at 11:14 AM

Quote: Originally posted by JZ  
Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
It's rather amusing seeing you guys tie yourself in knots with irrelevant stuff, trying to deny what is happening. I really am bamboozled at what you get out if it.


Nothing we do is going to impact CC. The only thing that will happen is ppl will give up their freedoms and $'s and other ppl will get rich and fly around on private jets to their 10 houses.


[Edited on 7-15-2023 by JZ]


Blah blah blah, reoeating yourself endlessly.

That isn't what I was talking about. I was referring you and your fellow deniers posting regional temperatures, as if that is in any way relevant to the fact that global temperature averages are soaring and unprecedented in recorded history in many places.

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 12:55 PM

S,

The really great thing about those “global temperatures” is there’s no global thermometer you can view. It’s necessary to take the word of people who can’t fly commercial air flights, travel in big convoys of SUVs, have multiple homes with utility bills the size of the budgets of 3rd world countries and can’t find out who left a bag of Coke on a table in the White House!

They of course blame those around them for living too “high on the hog” and causing the problem!

You believe these people because they are the “authorities” LOL!

Exclamation points - 3

surabi - 7-15-2023 at 01:24 PM

Say what, RFClark? So you think that the temperatures that are being reported around the world are made up nonsense by people with an agenda? Who are telling you the recorded temperature in Delhi or Johannesburg today is 20 degrees hotter than it actually is?
Do you not think that all countries have their own meteorologists and recording equipment? How's life down in your rabbit hole?

[Edited on 7-15-2023 by surabi]

[Edited on 7-15-2023 by surabi]

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 01:32 PM

S,

But those are just “regional temperatures” as well. Why do they count more then the regional temperatures we post and you dismiss?

Solar maximum/minimum (Sun Spots)

AKgringo - 7-15-2023 at 02:15 PM

Right now, we are in a period of Solar Maximum. Increased sunspot activity and solar flares have a slight effect on the surface temperature on Earth. It is not the cause of global warming but it is a contributing factor.

Ancient astronomers were aware of sunspots, and actually tracked their appearance and duration. An extended period of minimal activity in the late 16th and early 17th century, called "The Maunder Minimum", occurred simultaneously with the "little ice age"

Don Pisto - 7-15-2023 at 03:19 PM

Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
Right now, we are in a period of Solar Maximum. Increased sunspot activity and solar flares have a slight effect on the surface temperature on Earth. It is not the cause of global warming but it is a contributing factor.

Ancient astronomers were aware of sunspots, and actually tracked their appearance and duration. An extended period of minimal activity in the late 16th and early 17th century, called "The Maunder Minimum", occurred simultaneously with the "little ice age"


I looked in Miami I looked in Negril.....

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 03:33 PM

S,

I understand it and since the earth is more than 70% water or ice without many weather stations the temperature must be measured from space.

This means that we have only about 30 years of data for most of the world. Further from Space only the surface temperature can be measured so we don’t in fact have much data on the sub-surface temperature profile for the oceans or areas under ice, snow, or clouds.

Since you dislike explanations (from men) with which you disagree I will list some points you should consider.

1) Do you know how the temperatures taken by the satellites which are the average (pixel size) of a few sq Km are weighted against the land temperatures which are point measurements.

2) Do you know if the land readings are used as single points or the average of some number of points?

3) Do you know what adjustments if any, are applied to the sea or land readings.

4) Do you know if adjustments are made for areas under snow, ice, or clouds?

5) Do you even look at the actual temperatures for areas forecast to have high temps? Hint: Phoenix was in the low 80s this AM not 96 as stated by the goat.

Get back to me when you know the answers!


bajaric - 7-15-2023 at 03:46 PM

So, the sun pours its energy out towards the earth. The position of the earth relative to the sun, the tilt of the axis, and its rotation are what governs the temperature on the planet. A little closer, and the water would all be boiled away, a little farther, and it would be frozen. Imagine if the earth had a dark side like the moon, with one side frozen solid and one side boiling hot.

And yet somehow the planet is right in the sweet spot, spinning at just the right rate and tilted at just the right angle so that there is ice at the poles and liquid water in the oceans, a condition that has persisted for 500 million years; long enough for primitive fossilized fish to be found at elevations of 8,000 feet in Canada due to tectonic uplift of marine sediments. https://theconversation.com/the-oldest-fish-in-the-world-liv...

The prevailing internet-fueled group think is that humans have burned so much coal and oil in the last wo hundred years that it is altering the temperature of the planet and melting the ice at the poles. It is hard to believe that 200 years of human activity would upset an equilibrium that has lasted for 500 million years. Imagine the forest fires and asteroid impacts that must have taken place over that time span. And yet all that time the earth had liquid water at the equator and ice at the poles. Could we really have ruined it in just two centuries?

Perhaps. What if coal and oil were a sort of regulating mechanism that stored the energy of the sun when too much of it was heating up the planet. Then we dug it up and pumped it out and burned it and threw the whole system out of whack. Or maybe it is all just a bunch of bs, just a new manifestation of the age-old battle between the jocks who drove Camaros and dated the cheerleaders and the nerds who rode ten speeds and squeezed pimples.

Either way, the persistence of liquid water in the oceans of earth over such a long period of time is truly a gift, one might say, from God. It enabled a bunch of random amino acids to combine into self-replicating helical coils that gave rise to life on earth. Imagine how long it took for that random event to happen, creating self-sustaining life from a stew of chemicals. Perhaps it happened only once in the history of the planet, a once in three billion years event, which is why all living things have the same DNA structure in every cell, composed of the same four nucleic acids.
And here we are.

OK back to fish tacos.

surabi - 7-15-2023 at 03:56 PM

"And yet all that time the earth had liquid water at the equator and ice at the poles. Could we really have ruined it in just two centuries?"

Yes.

Destroying things takes a fraction of the time it takes to build them. The amount of time needed to create something is unrelated to the time it takes to destroy it.

It might take 2 years to build a house that it takes 2 minutes for a hurricane to demolish.

An artist could spend 4 years painting murals on the walls of a building that a couple of graffiti taggers could ruin in a few minutes with a few cans of spray paint.

A human can live 50 years in great health, contract some incurable disease or infection that doesn't respond to any treatment, and suddenly be dead within a few days.

A baby can develop for 9 months in the womb, be perfectly formed and healthy, and emerge stillborn because the umbilical cord got wrapped around its neck in the birth canal during labor.

[Edited on 7-15-2023 by surabi]

[Edited on 7-15-2023 by surabi]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by surabi]

JZ - 7-15-2023 at 04:03 PM

Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
"And yet all that time the earth had liquid water at the equator and ice at the poles. Could we really have ruined it in just two centuries?"

Yes.

Destroying things takes a fraction of the time it takes to build them. It might take 2 years to build a house that it takes 2 minutes for a hurricane to destroy.


Please explain this.


JZ - 7-15-2023 at 04:10 PM

If you only watch one video on CC, this is the one you need to watch.



surabi - 7-15-2023 at 04:35 PM

Quote: Originally posted by JZ  
Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
"And yet all that time the earth had liquid water at the equator and ice at the poles. Could we really have ruined it in just two centuries?"

Yes.

Destroying things takes a fraction of the time it takes to build them. It might take 2 years to build a house that it takes 2 minutes for a hurricane to destroy.


Please explain this.



Your response does not relate to my post. As usual, you deflect to something else.

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 05:59 PM

“And yet all that time the earth had liquid water at the equator and ice at the poles. Could we really have ruined it in just two centuries?"

No actually it didn’t read about snowball earth and when there was dirt at the poles not water!

Things have been a lot different in the past.

mtgoat666 - 7-15-2023 at 07:18 PM

I encourage all you deniers to move to FL, TX and AZ. You and your progeny deserve what you get, you best hope your denials are true, because if they are not then your progeny will be living in chithole states, and CA, OR and WA wont let you come back :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

Hey, will natural selection favor short people or tall people in the coming inferno chitstorm? White people or black?

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by mtgoat666]

RFClark - 7-15-2023 at 09:21 PM

S,

So when are you going to move where you won’t have anything to criticize and complain about?

goat,

No, “natural selection will favor” those who choose to have children and do their best to try and raise them to deal with what life throws at them.

You did notice the slight (30+%) increase in felonies since CA went to the same “0” cash bail system as NY or did you miss that?

Fastest growing state is FL. SFO lost 7.1% of its population in a single year. I guess no one likes poop on the sidewalks.

Speaking of poop on the sidewalks how’s SD doing?

Certainly don't see that in BC or BCS.

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

surabi - 7-15-2023 at 09:47 PM

Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
S,

So when are you going to move where you won’t have anything to criticize and complain about?


Do you hear me complain about living in Mexico? Or constantly criticize things in Mexico? There's challenges, to be sure, and things that could be improved, but I wouldn't live somewhere the positive didn't outweigh the negative, and when it did in the past, I moved on.

RFClark - 7-16-2023 at 08:47 AM

S,

The move reference was related to the choice of places you choose to troll!

Exclamation points used - 1

mtgoat666 - 7-16-2023 at 09:54 AM

Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  

Fastest growing state is FL. SFO lost 7.1% of its population in a single year. I guess no one likes poop on the sidewalks.

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]

[Edited on 7-16-2023 by RFClark]


Florida pop growth does not mean it is a desirable place to live. Congo has super high pop growth, doesnt make it a place i want to live. I have been to florida, it is very, very low on my list of desirable places to live… so low on the list, it fell off the list and will never be considered.

Spent time in san fran and seattle in past month. Both cities got homeless problems, but otherwise are fantastic cities. These cities need to build more slums (aka affordable housing) to accommodate the poor, drug addicts and mentally ill abandoned by GOP’s dismantling of the social safety net…

P.s. san fran pop drop was mostly due to housing prices, and covid work from home provisions. The housing prices remain higher in san fran than florida, because florida is a miserable place to live and san fran is great :bounce:


[Edited on 7-16-2023 by mtgoat666]

RFClark - 7-16-2023 at 11:23 AM

goat,

Poop not pop. As in the Homeless drug users poop on the sidewalks in SFO, LAX, OC, SD and others. Can you say Typhoid, TB, COVID, Hepatitis and much more.

Aside from that Mrs, Lincoln how was the play comes to mind re. SFO & Seatac.

JZ - 7-17-2023 at 04:03 PM

Scientist measure temperatures going back 8,000 years using ice cores.



AKgringo - 7-17-2023 at 05:47 PM

That was an interesting video. If I followed the procedure correctly, they are measuring a variation of temperature in the ice pack going back ten thousand years!

Even if they are able to date the formation of the layers of ice (carbon dating?) I find it a bit incredible that the existing temperature remains the same as when the ice was formed.

Ice has the ability to absorb infra-red radiation from an object that is warmer than it, while radiating to an object that is colder. The bottom of the ice pack would be absorbing heat from the earths core, while the surface could be radiating it to the blackness of space.

Cloud cover, or lack of it, affects the nature of ice crystals within a snow pack, and probably an ice sheet, but I have never studied the subject further than what might contribute to an avalanche hazard.

JZ - 7-17-2023 at 06:36 PM

Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
That was an interesting video. If I followed the procedure correctly, they are measuring a variation of temperature in the ice pack going back ten thousand years!

Even if they are able to date the formation of the layers of ice (carbon dating?) I find it a bit incredible that the existing temperature remains the same as when the ice was formed.

Ice has the ability to absorb infra-red radiation from an object that is warmer than it, while radiating to an object that is colder. The bottom of the ice pack would be absorbing heat from the earths core, while the surface could be radiating it to the blackness of space.

Cloud cover, or lack of it, affects the nature of ice crystals within a snow pack, and probably an ice sheet, but I have never studied the subject further than what might contribute to an avalanche hazard.


Three important questions - even if you accept that the climate is changing and temperatures are increasing.

1. Increasing compared to what? We have a very small range of actual recorded temp data relative to the history of the Earth. What if we started recording when we were in a low cycle as that video suggests.

2. Is the increase due to man? This is very much unsettled.

3. Can man do anything to reverse C02 expansion? To me this is the most settled of all the questions. This is absolutely not going to happen. The best bet of it happening would be to use nuclear energy. Until I hear a government entity push nuclear technology (or the like), I can't believe they are serious about lowering C02 emissions.

Final conclusion, climate change is used to capture money and power.

Recommendations: focus on improving air quality. Use EV's in dense cities. Don't try to push EV's onto everyone. Let the technology evolve and use it where it makes sense. Use solar for home use. Do not build big wind or solar farms. These are very bad for the environment. Invest in nuclear.

/thread

surabi - 7-17-2023 at 07:42 PM

While it's all very interesting to know about what temperatures in times in the far distant past were, it's kind of beside the point. The question now is whether the rapidly changing climate will continue to support life as we know it.

SFandH - 7-18-2023 at 08:56 AM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  

These cities need to build more slums (aka affordable housing) to accommodate the poor, drug addicts and mentally ill


Twenty or thirty years ago or more, I wondered why cities didn't redevelop the slummy areas. Well, they have; it's called gentrification. The old, dilapidated, cheap rent buildings have been torn down and replaced with condos for the upwardly mobile. Landowners, developers, and others in the real estate business have made a bundle. Plus the cities are collecting more in property taxes.

The problem is now poor people don't have any place to live except the street—unintended consequences of redevelopment. Every city needs "the slums", "the other side of the tracks". But those areas are disappearing, or are gone.

It's a tough problem to solve.

[Edited on 7-18-2023 by SFandH]

Cliffy - 7-18-2023 at 09:03 AM

AK and SF kind of hit a homer with those responses

SFandH - 7-18-2023 at 09:27 AM

During the first half of the 20th century, East Coast cities like New York, Philadelphia, Boston, etc., tore down the 19th-century tenements and built high-rise "projects". The "projects" are bad places to live, noted for high crime rates, but they put a roof over poor people's heads.

JZ - 7-18-2023 at 09:31 AM

SFandH bringing good comments.


pacificobob - 7-18-2023 at 10:02 AM

Quote: Originally posted by RFClark  
PB,

Belief in what seems “highly improbable” (at the time) You mean like continents moving or heaver than air things flying or a particle being in two places at the same time?

The established scientific community had “faith” that all of those things were impossible before they changed their minds,


Such a compelling argument. I've just become a theiest.
Fear of one's death make religion an easy sell. Heck fear in general is a great sales tool. Burning in hell for all eternity is very scary.

[Edited on 7-18-2023 by pacificobob]

surabi - 7-18-2023 at 12:27 PM

Quote: Originally posted by JZ  


Where were you when Vegas went a record 291 days without hitting 100?




"Airline passengers pass out awaiting takeoff in triple-digit temps in Las Vegas"

https://www.rawstory.com/delta-air-lines-las-vegas/

mtgoat666 - 7-20-2023 at 03:52 PM

Long-lost Greenland ice core suggests potential for disastrous sea level rise

(CNN ) A recently discovered ice core taken from beneath Greenland’s ice sheet decades ago has revealed that a large part of the country was ice-free around 400,000 years ago, when temperatures were similar to those the world is approaching now, according to a new report – an alarming finding that could have disastrous implications for sea level rise.

The study overturns previous assumptions that most of Greenland’s ice sheet has been frozen for millions of years, the authors said. Instead, moderate, natural warming led to large-scale melting and sea level rise of more than 1.4 meters (4.6 feet), according to the report published Thursday in the journal Science.

“When you look at what nature did in the past, as geoscientists, that’s our best clue to the future,” said Paul Bierman, a scientist at the University of Vermont and a lead author of the study. Bierman further explained that "looking at vacation snapshots of palm trees to document sea level and paleoclimate is lunacy."

https://www.cnn.com/2023/07/20/world/greenland-ice-sheet-mel...



[Edited on 7-20-2023 by mtgoat666]

SFandH - 7-20-2023 at 04:01 PM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  


“When you look at what nature did in the past, as geoscientists, that’s our best clue to the future,” said Paul Bierman, a scientist at the University of Vermont and a lead author of the study. Bierman further explained that "looking at vacation snapshots of palm trees to document sea level and paleoclimate is lunacy."


:lol:


mtgoat666 - 7-20-2023 at 04:35 PM

Addicted to electricity…

Would an occasional blackout help solve climate change?
https://www.latimes.com/environment/newsletter/2023-07-20/wo...


Is anywhere truly safe from climate change?
I Thought My State Was Safe From Climate Change
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2023/07/climate-...

Climate Collapse Could Happen Fast
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2023/07/climate-...

She’s on a Mission From God: Suing Big Oil for Climate Damages
https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/19/climate/climate-lawsuit-p...

Al Gore on Extreme Heat and the Fight Against Fossil Fuels
“Every night on the TV news is like taking a nature hike through the Book of Revelation,” Gore said.
https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/18/climate/al-gore-on-extrem...



[Edited on 7-20-2023 by mtgoat666]

Barry A. - 7-20-2023 at 07:59 PM

Quote: Originally posted by SFandH  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  


“When you look at what nature did in the past, as geoscientists, that’s our best clue to the future,” said Paul Bierman, a scientist at the University of Vermont and a lead author of the study. Bierman further explained that "looking at vacation snapshots of palm trees to document sea level and paleoclimate is lunacy."


:lol:



This quote of "Bierman" comments, to me, represents such insensitivity and lack of thought that I really wish I had not seen it. It is so depressing!!! that people really think this way.


caj13 - 7-21-2023 at 11:13 AM

By loon - I assume Cliffy means scientists with 20 years of training educatuion and experience, looking at literally hundreds of millions of data points, and using some of the most sophisticated computers and software on the planet .

Because everyone knows some guy - who actually believes the earth is flat - and only 6000 years old - has undeniable proof that all that science is BS - because he's got a photo of a palm tree.

and the best part of that are the disciples here who adoringly follow their cult leader - in lockstep spouting their mantra - palm tree photo negates any and all data and science .

Oh yeah - I'm sure its no surprise to them that we have just had the hottest month on record across the earth - flat or round - David - you need to come up with some corollary to the Palm Tree denial, that covers those rapidly increasing temperatures. I'll give you a hint - us scientists took over the thermometer businesses world wide, and we just jack the scales up a few degrees - easy peasee!

KurtG - 7-21-2023 at 02:32 PM

Quote: Originally posted by caj13  
I'll give you a hint - us scientists took over the thermometer businesses world wide, and we just jack the scales up a few degrees - easy peasee!

Hey! You were sworn to secrecy on that! That's the problem with conspiracies, no one can keep a secret.

surabi - 7-21-2023 at 04:03 PM

And for those of you who still don't get it, or understand how climate change will affect your life directly in the here and now-

https://www.rawstory.com/worsening-heatwaves-put-entire-glob...

I have listened to some radio shows this week where they were interviewing farmers, who said their crops are literally cooking in the fields. This is not some prediction- it is happening right now.

AKgringo - 7-21-2023 at 04:21 PM

The humidity is a killer at 76%. It is currently 100 F (37.8 C?) where I am in Grass Valley CA, but the humidity is only 7%.

[Edited on 7-22-2023 by AKgringo]

surabi - 7-21-2023 at 04:35 PM

I'm an hour north of Puerto Vallarta, where it is currently 33 degrees C, but "feels like" 42, because the humidity is 79%.

It has been consistently this hot for weeks. Even when it clouds over, which it has done a lot lately, it doesn't feel any cooler. Sitting in front of the fan barely helps because it's just blowing hot air.

[Edited on 7-21-2023 by surabi]

Don Pisto - 7-21-2023 at 05:09 PM

Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
I'm an hour north of Puerto Vallarta, where it is currently 33 degrees C, but "feels like" 42, because the humidity is 79%.

It has been consistently this hot for weeks. Even when it clouds over, which it has done a lot lately, it doesn't feel any cooler. Sitting in front of the fan barely helps because it's just blowing hot air.

[Edited on 7-21-2023 by surabi]


and we still have august and september....whats been your hottest month over there?

surabi - 7-21-2023 at 05:40 PM

Normally, I find June and mid-late Oct. to be the hottest months here- before the rainy season starts and after it ends, when it's just hot and humid. But this year, it's been July.
In the past, by early July, it's raining almost every late aft, evening, or o'nite, which cools things down. There's been mornings in August and Sept after an all night rain where it was chilly enough in the morning that I put on a long sleeved shirt. It'll get hot and steamy when the sun comes out during the day, but then the rain cools it down again.

But this year, we've had very little rain so far. Last year it didn't rain enough either. And winters are getting colder. There were weeks on end in January and Feb. where it went down to 42F. I'd never experienced that before in the 20 years I've lived here, aside from one winter maybe 19 years ago. And that was just for a few nights, not 2 months.

I have never had complaints about the heat and humidity here in the PV area before. I like hot weather and can handle it way better than most people, but it's just brutal now.



[Edited on 7-22-2023 by surabi]

SFandH - 7-21-2023 at 06:01 PM

I wonder if real estate prices in Phoenix will go down because of the heat. I bet there are a lot of people there thinking they need to move out of the heat. I can't imagine spending all day inside with AC and the windows closed because it's too hot outside.

Nice in the winter, though.

Thank goodness I live on the Pacific coast near San Diego during the summer. In fact, I haven't lived in a house or apartment with AC or a furnace for almost 50 years.



[Edited on 7-22-2023 by SFandH]

mtgoat666 - 7-21-2023 at 06:01 PM

Climate records tumble, leaving Earth in uncharted territory!!!!
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-66229065

OMG!

Will temps keep climbing until 30 or 50 or 100 years from now much of North American desert is uninhabitable to human or any other life?


[Edited on 7-22-2023 by mtgoat666]

SFandH - 7-21-2023 at 06:11 PM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  


Will temps keep climbing until 30 or 50 or 100 years from now much of North American desert is uninhabitable to human or any other life?


[Edited on 7-22-2023 by mtgoat666]


I'd bet on it.

[Edited on 7-22-2023 by SFandH]

AKgringo - 7-21-2023 at 06:15 PM

My family in Anchorage have been telling me that this spring has been abnormally cool and wet. With 20 hours of daylight and lots of rain, lawns are out of control. Mowing tall, wet grass twice a week is not fun!

surabi - 7-21-2023 at 06:44 PM

My daughter lives on central Vancouver Island. Says it's really hot there and it hasn't rained since April. No rain in the Pacific Northwest for 3 months straight? Sometimes there's no rain in July and August, but it has always rained in the spring and early summer before. She said their area is at max drought level.

A lot of these climate change deniers are going to find that they are going to be suffering far more "inconveniences" than some climate action protesters blocking traffic.



[Edited on 7-22-2023 by surabi]

This is an interesting article

soulpatch - 7-22-2023 at 10:29 AM

Records being set.

mtgoat666 - 7-22-2023 at 06:43 PM

Quote: Originally posted by soulpatch  
Records being set.


People are going to have to start migrating toward polar regions. Living in temps 100 for days on end is nuts, and miserable.

Headline:
As US heat wave spreads, Arizona counts the dead: 18 confirmed, dozens more suspected

[Edited on 7-23-2023 by mtgoat666]

JZ - 7-23-2023 at 12:23 AM

Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
My daughter lives on central Vancouver Island. Says it's really hot there and it hasn't rained since April. No rain in the Pacific Northwest for 3 months straight? Sometimes there's no rain in July and August, but it has always rained in the spring and early summer before. She said their area is at max drought level.

A lot of these climate change deniers are going to find that they are going to be suffering far more "inconveniences" than some climate action protesters blocking traffic.



[Edited on 7-22-2023 by surabi]



It rained almost every day in SoCal from January to June.

We are in Ireland now, it's suppose to rain for the next 10 days, it has rained all but 3 days in July so far. That is 3 times more than normal.

It's called weather. Not a reason to give up your freedom and $ to worthless governments.




[Edited on 7-23-2023 by JZ]

Barry A. - 7-23-2023 at 02:35 AM

Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by soulpatch  
Records being set.


People are going to have to start migrating toward polar regions. Living in temps 100 for days on end is nuts, and miserable.

Headline:
As US heat wave spreads, Arizona counts the dead: 18 confirmed, dozens more suspected


[Edited on 7-23-2023 by mtgoat666]




I, and some of my Family and friends, have lived and worked outside with summer temps well above 100 degrees since 1974 (El Centro, CA & Redding, CA) by choice. So far not one of us has died or become sick from the heat. Stay hydrated out there.



[Edited on 7-23-2023 by Barry A.]

mtgoat666 - 7-23-2023 at 08:49 AM

Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  
Quote: Originally posted by mtgoat666  
Quote: Originally posted by soulpatch  
Records being set.


People are going to have to start migrating toward polar regions. Living in temps 100 for days on end is nuts, and miserable.

Headline:
As US heat wave spreads, Arizona counts the dead: 18 confirmed, dozens more suspected


[Edited on 7-23-2023 by mtgoat666]




I, and some of my Family and friends, have lived and worked outside with summer temps well above 100 degrees since 1974 (El Centro, CA & Redding, CA) by choice. So far not one of us has died or become sick from the heat. Stay hydrated out there.



[Edited on 7-23-2023 by Barry A.]


Admit it, summer in El Centro is miserable!
The Central Valley is not much better in summer, though Redding does beat El Centro :lol:

AKgringo - 7-23-2023 at 09:03 AM

I grew up a little south of you in Grass Valley and had cousins in Redding, so I was very familiar with working (or playing) in excessive heat. I moved to Alaska in late 1980 and surrendered my ability to cope with it, and now I have returned to G.V.

I have been hiding from triple digits for the last three days with a swamp cooler for company. The humidity here is low enough that the cooler is all I need in an old, poorly insulated house.

[Edited on 7-23-2023 by AKgringo]

AKgringo - 7-23-2023 at 10:57 AM

A lot of times I use just the fan with the water turned off to keep the interior humidity low. My PGE bill runs about 40 to 50 dollars a month, depending on how much laundry I do.

It is about the same in the winter because I burn wood instead of using the natural gas furnace.

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