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Author: Subject: Gonzaga Bay to San Felipe Detours May 17, 2019
David K
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[*] posted on 5-24-2019 at 06:09 PM
Gonzaga Bay to San Felipe Detours May 17, 2019


Here are photos of every washed out bridge or obliterated roadbed detour taken at the beginning of each detour and some photos along the way.

The flash flood/ hurricane was on Oct. 1, 2018.


#1




#2




#3


#4


#5




#6




#7




#8




#9





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The new, wider highway construction north of Puertecitos (to Arroyo Matomí) began long before the flash flood. That detour is about 9 miles long and the surface was good, last Friday.

North of Puertecitos begins the new, wider highway construction using bridges instead of vados. The detour road is quite good:










Back onto the older, 1990's narrow paved road at Km. 60.


Playa/ Campo/ Rancho Nuevo Mazatlan road at Km. 32


Bahía San Felipe


The south of town Pemex is now a Chevron station.

The above photos are from my May 12-17, 2019 trip report, posted here: http://forums.bajanomad.com/viewthread.php?tid=92768




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[*] posted on 5-25-2019 at 07:36 AM


Thanks for the update. I'm taking that route next week to La Paz.



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[*] posted on 5-26-2019 at 08:14 AM


wow - lots of time to fix all that. Interesting - one photo shows a very large drainage culvert under the highway pavement, but apparently was totally inadequate.
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David K
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[*] posted on 5-26-2019 at 11:40 AM


Yes, totally! The engineers apparently thought a desert never gets any rain. The first flash flood, just 4 years after the highway was finished in that stretch, took it right out!



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[*] posted on 5-26-2019 at 12:03 PM


Quote: Originally posted by wilderone  
wow - lots of time to fix all that. Interesting - one photo shows a very large drainage culvert under the highway pavement, but apparently was totally inadequate.


In addition to estimating how much water will come down an arroyo, the engineers must take a wild a** guess if there will be enough debris coming with the flood to turn the culvert into a dam.

Once the flood is running over a bridge or culvert, it is doomed to damage, or destruction!




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[*] posted on 5-26-2019 at 03:36 PM


It takes more that. When desert sand is used to protect the bridge end supports and shoulders of the roads. There is no hope that even the smallest water flow would cause great damage.
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BajaDanD
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[*] posted on 5-26-2019 at 10:17 PM


We are heading down to Gonzaga next Sunday with our boat going to take it slowly and carefully
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[*] posted on 5-28-2019 at 08:20 PM


Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
Quote: Originally posted by wilderone  
wow - lots of time to fix all that. Interesting - one photo shows a very large drainage culvert under the highway pavement, but apparently was totally inadequate.


In addition to estimating how much water will come down an arroyo, the engineers must take a wild a** guess if there will be enough debris coming with the flood to turn the culvert into a dam.

Once the flood is running over a bridge or culvert, it is doomed to damage, or destruction!




Which is why I have said for years that they should stick with "vados" (Texas Crossings)------much easier and faster to repair, and not nearly as expensive.


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[*] posted on 5-28-2019 at 08:29 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  
Quote: Originally posted by AKgringo  
Quote: Originally posted by wilderone  
wow - lots of time to fix all that. Interesting - one photo shows a very large drainage culvert under the highway pavement, but apparently was totally inadequate.


In addition to estimating how much water will come down an arroyo, the engineers must take a wild a** guess if there will be enough debris coming with the flood to turn the culvert into a dam.

Once the flood is running over a bridge or culvert, it is doomed to damage, or destruction!




Which is why I have said for years that they should stick with "vados" (Texas Crossings)------much easier and faster to repair, and not nearly as expensive.




Never heard them called a “Texas crossing”

Here in the SW USA we call them Arizona crossings, and more rarely fords or low-water crossings. How about Irish bridge? :lol:

[Edited on 5-29-2019 by mtgoat666]




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[*] posted on 5-28-2019 at 08:39 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Barry A.  



Which is why I have said for years that they should stick with "vados" (Texas Crossings)------much easier and faster to repair, and not nearly as expensive.




Exactly and in the right vehicle they are really fun at 70 or so.




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[*] posted on 7-18-2019 at 08:27 PM


Quote: Originally posted by David K  
Bump


We went down June 8th, stopped at Bufeo, Delfines, and Gonzaga. Lots of photos just like DKs. Alfonsina's has been remodeled and looks quite nice. They must be making some big bucks!

You just might land up behind a 18-wheeler loaded with rebar and hope its not going to block the road. Lots of big trucks and dozers.
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[*] posted on 7-19-2019 at 01:04 PM


When John M and I were down there a couple of weeks ago work was being done on only one bypass below Puertecitos.
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David K
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[*] posted on 8-19-2019 at 09:27 AM


bump



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