BajaNomad
Not logged in [Login - Register]

Go To Bottom
Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2  
Author: Subject: Favorite word of the day
surabi
Ultra Nomad
*****




Posts: 3645
Registered: 5-6-2016
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-31-2023 at 10:15 PM


Good one.
View user's profile
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2023 at 06:43 AM


As for brand names that instill confidence, who can forget the classic Chevy Nova?





Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
Tacayo
Newbie





Posts: 21
Registered: 11-19-2021
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2023 at 09:24 AM


Ahora, def. a vague term dealing with time. Could mean now, soon, tomorrow or quien sabe?
View user's profile
surfhat
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 509
Registered: 6-4-2012
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2023 at 10:53 AM


And, who cannot forget the somewhat regular, make that low grade gasoline product Nova. No go, says it all, with octane levels in the low mid 80's, if not the upper 70's.

Could you hear the knock when accelerating. Absolutely. Sometimes adjusting the timing could help. Somewhat. And the lead, oh yea, the leaded fuel.

Not such the good old days after, at least for the engines. We have it pretty good these days with quality fuel everywhere.

Look on the brighter side of life [Monty Python] when you can. Leave your politics off of this sight please. Oh well. Worth a shot. Peace and love [Ringo forever or at least it appears he is ageless. Attitude can carry one far as he shows, year after year, decade after decade.

View user's profile
surabi
Ultra Nomad
*****




Posts: 3645
Registered: 5-6-2016
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-1-2023 at 06:45 PM


Quote: Originally posted by Tacayo  
Ahora, def. a vague term dealing with time. Could mean now, soon, tomorrow or quien sabe?


All terms dealing with time are vague in Mexico. Even ones that sound specific, like, "Si, vengo a las 10".

I was once at an office where I had to speak to a specific person. The receptionist told me he was out of the office. I asked when he'd be back (you also have to solicit every piece of information, as "He's out of the office right now, he'll be back at 1", would require giving you all the info efficiently), and she replied, "Un ratito". The dictionary definition of which is "in a little while".

As I wasn't hip to these things then, I sat down in a waiting room chair. After 20 minutes, I asked, "When do you expect him back?", to which she shrugged. I asked if she knew whether he was coming back to the office at all that afternoon, to which she answered no.

Now when someone tells me "un ratito" I ask, "Un ratito como cinco minutos o cinco horas?" I usually get the shrug.
View user's profile
Don Jorge
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 647
Registered: 8-29-2003
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-2-2023 at 07:18 AM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
I agree, and inevitably when I say that word, my nose wrinkles up as if something stinks.

Another word which is fun to say and usually involves facial emphasis, Guácala.




�And it never failed that during the dry years the people forgot about the rich years, and during the wet years they lost all memory of the dry years. It was always that way.�― John Steinbeck

"All models are wrong, but some are useful." George E.P. Box

"Nature bats last." Doug "Hayduke" Peac-ck
View user's profile
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2023 at 07:49 AM


Quote: Originally posted by surabi  
Quote: Originally posted by Tacayo  
Ahora, def. a vague term dealing with time. Could mean now, soon, tomorrow or quien sabe?


All terms dealing with time are vague in Mexico. Even ones that sound specific, like, "Si, vengo a las 10".

I was once at an office where I had to speak to a specific person. The receptionist told me he was out of the office. I asked when he'd be back (you also have to solicit every piece of information, as "He's out of the office right now, he'll be back at 1", would require giving you all the info efficiently), and she replied, "Un ratito". The dictionary definition of which is "in a little while".

As I wasn't hip to these things then, I sat down in a waiting room chair. After 20 minutes, I asked, "When do you expect him back?", to which she shrugged. I asked if she knew whether he was coming back to the office at all that afternoon, to which she answered no.

Now when someone tells me "un ratito" I ask, "Un ratito como cinco minutos o cinco horas?" I usually get the shrug.


I love that "ahorita" is no more precise than "ahora."




Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
surfhat
Senior Nomad
***




Posts: 509
Registered: 6-4-2012
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-3-2023 at 08:08 AM


Or mañana.
View user's profile
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-5-2023 at 09:00 AM


Another favorite Spanish word is "malabarista", which translates to "juggler" in English. I see it as how I might prepare lattes and espressos if I worked at Starbucks.



Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
AKgringo
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 5920
Registered: 9-20-2014
Location: Anchorage, AK (no mas!)
Member Is Online

Mood: Retireded

[*] posted on 6-5-2023 at 04:01 PM


I was in an open air restaurant near Zihuantanejo once where there was a parrot that kept calling out "Ahorita!" (Right now!).

Apparently, it was his dinner time.




If you are not living on the edge, you are taking up too much space!

"Could do better if he tried!" Report card comments from most of my grade school teachers. Sadly, still true!
View user's profile
surabi
Ultra Nomad
*****




Posts: 3645
Registered: 5-6-2016
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-5-2023 at 10:41 PM


I find the words that appear to be taken from English, but then, because they are spoken with a Spanish accent,, become a word in Spanish with no word origin basis in Latin languages, to be amusing.

Like "dona". I figure some Mexican came back from the US and said, "They have this yummy pastry there, it's called a dona". (In English, doughnut makes sense- it's made of dough and apparently the first doughnuts were more like a doughnut hole shape- a nut shape rather than a torus)

Once I was working on something alongside a worker, and needed the exacto knife that was next to him, so asked him to please pass me the cuchillo (I wasn't sure what the specific name for an exacto knife was, but figured that was close enough). As he passed it to me, he told me it wasn't called a cuchillo, it was a "cooter", spelled "cuter".
That is obviously a mispronunciation of "cutter" but in Spanish, of course to cut is cortar.

One word I found confusing when learning Spanish was "subir". Because in English, as well as Spanish, "sub" is a prefix denoting something below- submarino, subterraneo, subordinado. Yet subir means to go up.

[Edited on 6-6-2023 by surabi]
View user's profile
surabi
Ultra Nomad
*****




Posts: 3645
Registered: 5-6-2016
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 6-6-2023 at 08:34 PM


Thanks for the new word, navaja. It actually wasn't a knife like that, I don't even know what you call it in English- one of those little knives with long replaceable blades that you slide up and down and can snap off the dull top to get a new sharp cutting end.

That worker had never been in the US- he told me the farthest he'd ever been from here in Sayulita was Acapulco, on some field trip with his church group when he was a teenager. But I'm sure he worked with lots of other guys who had worked up north.
View user's profile
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-6-2023 at 08:29 AM
what a roller coaster!


This isn't so much a question as much as a recent discovery on my part: the Spanish translation for "roller coaster" is apparently "montaña rusa", literally "Russian mountain."



Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
lencho
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 96
Registered: 1-16-2005
Location: Tan lejos de Dios y tan cerca de EU
Member Is Offline

Mood: Somnoliento

[*] posted on 8-7-2023 at 05:32 AM


Quote: Originally posted by pauldavidmena  
This isn't so much a question as much as a recent discovery on my part: the Spanish translation for "roller coaster" is apparently "montaña rusa", literally "Russian mountain."

Wikipedia:

"La montaña rusa debe su nombre a las diversiones desarrolladas durante el invierno en Rusia, donde existían grandes toboganes de madera que se descendían con trineos deslizables sobre la nieve. Irónicamente, los rusos lo llaman Amyerikánskiye gorki (en ruso: Американские горки) o "montaña americana"."




"I can normally tell how intelligent a man is, by how stupid he thinks I am."

"...they were careful of their demeanor that they not be thought to have opinions on what they heard for like most men skilled at their work they were scornful of any least suggestion of knowing anything not learned at first hand."
            Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses

"Be kind, be patient, help others." -- Isabel Allende

"My gas stove identifies as electric." Anonymous

View user's profile
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-7-2023 at 06:07 AM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Quote: Originally posted by pauldavidmena  
This isn't so much a question as much as a recent discovery on my part: the Spanish translation for "roller coaster" is apparently "montaña rusa", literally "Russian mountain."

Wikipedia:

"La montaña rusa debe su nombre a las diversiones desarrolladas durante el invierno en Rusia, donde existían grandes toboganes de madera que se descendían con trineos deslizables sobre la nieve. Irónicamente, los rusos lo llaman Amyerikánskiye gorki (en ruso: Американские горки) o "montaña americana"."


Who knew that amusement parks could be another front in the Cold War?




Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-10-2023 at 09:31 AM
puzzling...


Today's word of the day from spanishdictionary.com was "rompecabezas", translated to "jigsaw puzzle" but literally "break heads." Ouch!



Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
lencho
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 96
Registered: 1-16-2005
Location: Tan lejos de Dios y tan cerca de EU
Member Is Offline

Mood: Somnoliento

[*] posted on 8-13-2023 at 08:38 AM
Me cayó el chahuiztle


Another that's fun to say. And you'll impress all your Mexican friends when you use it. :cool:

Ay, caray, ¡ya nos cayó el chahuiztle!




"I can normally tell how intelligent a man is, by how stupid he thinks I am."

"...they were careful of their demeanor that they not be thought to have opinions on what they heard for like most men skilled at their work they were scornful of any least suggestion of knowing anything not learned at first hand."
            Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses

"Be kind, be patient, help others." -- Isabel Allende

"My gas stove identifies as electric." Anonymous

View user's profile
Skipjack Joe
Elite Nomad
******




Posts: 8084
Registered: 7-12-2004
Location: Bahia Asuncion
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-13-2023 at 08:34 PM


favorite: boracheria
View user's profile
pauldavidmena
Super Nomad
****


Avatar


Posts: 1694
Registered: 5-23-2013
Location: Centerville, MA, USA
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 8-14-2023 at 06:00 AM


Quote: Originally posted by lencho  
Another that's fun to say. And you'll impress all your Mexican friends when you use it. :cool:

Ay, caray, ¡ya nos cayó el chahuiztle!


It took some digging to find a definition for chahuiztle. Very Mexican!




Visit my Dreams of Pescadero blog:
http://dreamsofpescadero.wordpress.com/
View user's profile Visit user's homepage
lencho
Junior Nomad
*




Posts: 96
Registered: 1-16-2005
Location: Tan lejos de Dios y tan cerca de EU
Member Is Offline

Mood: Somnoliento

[*] posted on 8-14-2023 at 11:28 AM


Quote: Originally posted by pauldavidmena  
It took some digging to find a definition for chahuiztle. Very Mexican!

Mexican indeed (consider the spelling).

But I think we have a failure to communicate: the definition... is right there in the page I linked to above... ¿?




"I can normally tell how intelligent a man is, by how stupid he thinks I am."

"...they were careful of their demeanor that they not be thought to have opinions on what they heard for like most men skilled at their work they were scornful of any least suggestion of knowing anything not learned at first hand."
            Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses

"Be kind, be patient, help others." -- Isabel Allende

"My gas stove identifies as electric." Anonymous

View user's profile
 Pages:  1  2  

  Go To Top

 






All Content Copyright 1997- Q87 International; All Rights Reserved.
Powered by XMB; XMB Forum Software © 2001-2014 The XMB Group






"If it were lush and rich, one could understand the pull, but it is fierce and hostile and sullen. The stone mountains pile up to the sky and there is little fresh water. But we know we must go back if we live, and we don't know why." - Steinbeck, Log from the Sea of Cortez

 

"People don't care how much you know, until they know how much you care." - Theodore Roosevelt

 

"You can easily judge the character of others by how they treat those who they think can do nothing for them or to them." - Malcolm Forbes

 

"Let others lead small lives, but not you. Let others argue over small things, but not you. Let others cry over small hurts, but not you. Let others leave their future in someone else's hands, but not you." - Jim Rohn

 

"The best way to get the right answer on the internet is not to ask a question; it's to post the wrong answer." - Cunningham's Law







Thank you to Baja Bound Mexico Insurance Services for your long-term support of the BajaNomad.com Forums site.







Emergency Baja Contacts Include:

Desert Hawks; El Rosario-based ambulance transport; Emergency #: (616) 103-0262