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Author: Subject: Ice plant
SFandH
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[*] posted on 6-1-2023 at 03:22 PM


I just started using ChatGPT, I guess I'm late to the party. Anyway, here's what I asked and the chatbot's answer:

Q. what is the spanish name for the plant "ice plant"

A. The Spanish name for the plant "ice plant" is "planta de hielo" or "planta de escarcha."

Also

Q. what is dedos de moro?

A. "Dedos de moro" is a Spanish term that translates to "fingers of the Moor" in English. It is a common name used in Spain and some Spanish-speaking regions to refer to a specific plant called Carpobrotus edulis, which is also known as "edible ice plant" or "Hottentot fig" in English. Carpobrotus edulis is a succulent plant with fleshy leaves and colorful flowers that is native to South Africa but has been naturalized in many coastal areas around the world.

ChatGPT is truly incredible. Ask it anything. I asked it what gravity is and got a thorough answer. Impressive.

https://chat.openai.com/




[Edited on 6-1-2023 by SFandH]




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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 6-2-2023 at 11:40 AM


We had planted Iceplant in our courtyard as a slope stabilizer. It exploded in size and area immediately with minimal watering, sections out very easily, stores water well for the surrounding fruit trees and Bougainvillea, and shows a lot of colour. Hadn't known it was an invasive species as we see it in a lot of local planned gardens where slopes are steep around other plantings.




A century later and it's still just as applicable: Desiderata: http://mwkworks.com/desiderata.html
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surabi
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[*] posted on 6-2-2023 at 04:58 PM


As an avid gardener, I consider a plant invasive if it's hard to get rid of and if it does damage. Shallow rooted plants that are easy to dig up aren't the same kind of problem as plants with deep root systems. The Brits introduced Scotch broom and blackberries to Canada and they are hell to get rid of. And plants like spreading bamboo, that has tough roots that travel underground and pop up new bamboo shoots everywhere and break up walkways and foundations, are undesireable.
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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 6-3-2023 at 09:14 AM


Quote: Originally posted by pacificobob  
Ground cover plantings create an environment that easily hosts a variety of life.
Insects,rodents and reptiles to name a few. Without ground covering landscaping a home will have fewer mice, snakes and scorpions as well as other unwelcome species.


The biggest change we noticed in our courtyard since we planted was a large increase in birds, bees and other pollinating insects. This was followed by increased spottings of Geckos. Ants, termites, scorpions, moths and spiders were always around, not sure we have noticed an increase in their numbers. Also haven't noticed any increase in snakes, but its early days yet.




A century later and it's still just as applicable: Desiderata: http://mwkworks.com/desiderata.html
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pacificobob
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[*] posted on 6-4-2023 at 12:32 PM


I once installed a yard light,on at dusk off at dawn.
An huge change took place as a result. Night flying insects, bats, birds that eat the dead insects, scorpions and other crawling predators.
In other words it's easy to create/modify a micro environment with minor changes.
I removed the yard light.
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JDCanuck
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[*] posted on 6-4-2023 at 01:29 PM


Quote: Originally posted by pacificobob  
I once installed a yard light,on at dusk off at dawn.
An huge change took place as a result. Night flying insects, bats, birds that eat the dead insects, scorpions and other crawling predators.
In other words it's easy to create/modify a micro environment with minor changes.
I removed the yard light.


Yes, we noticed last fall right after the rains hit a huge increase in moths and other insects attempting to get in our windows as long as we had the interior lights on in evenings. At one point the windows in lit rooms were about 1/3 covered with moths beating their wings on the glass. Neighbours also had reported it was the worst fall they remembered for flies , mosquitoes, etc. and I believe someone here mentioned the mosquito issue and resulting sickness. I also saw a lot of rattlesnakes last fall, far fewer this winter and spring. I am tempted to think it was the unusually high volume of rain that made the biggest changes.

[Edited on 6-4-2023 by JDCanuck]




A century later and it's still just as applicable: Desiderata: http://mwkworks.com/desiderata.html
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