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Author: Subject: Vamos o Vamonos?
SFandH
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[*] posted on 6-24-2023 at 08:06 AM
Vamos o Vamonos?


I've always wondered about the difference. I've asked a couple of native Spanish speakers to explain the difference and they couldn't, at least not in a way I understood.

So, it's time to ask an AI chatbot.

Bard AI:

The Spanish words "vamos" and "vamonos" both mean "let's go". However, there is a subtle difference in meaning between the two words.

Vamos is the present tense conjugation of the verb "ir" for the first-person plural (nosotros). It can be used to express the idea of "let's go" in a general sense, or to suggest that we are going to do something together. For example, you might say "vamos a la playa" (let's go to the beach) or "vamos a comer" (let's go eat).

Vámonos is the imperative form of the verb "irse", which means "to leave". It is used to express the idea of "let's go" in a more specific sense, such as when you are suggesting that we leave a place or situation. For example, you might say "vámonos de aquí" (let's get out of here) or "vámonos ya" (let's go now).

In general, "vamos" is a more general word that can be used in a variety of contexts, while "vámonos" is a more specific word that is used to suggest that we are leaving a place.

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No wonder my Mex friends couldn't explain the difference.


[Edited on 6-24-2023 by SFandH]




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pacificobob
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[*] posted on 6-24-2023 at 12:05 PM


Good post
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David K
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[*] posted on 6-24-2023 at 12:59 PM


Great post...
Vamos is also the world for "we go". The verb ir (to go) is an interesting one in Spanish that is conjugated: voy, vas, va, vamos, van.




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surabi
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[*] posted on 6-24-2023 at 05:47 PM


Maybe David is one of those gringos who seem to think present tense is the only verb conjugation necessary and use it for everything? :lol:

I remember back when I looked at all the verb conjugations in Spanish and felt like it was going to be impossibly overwhelming to learn them all. Then one day I realized that the irregular verbs (which we of course also have in English), and the present, and 2 past tenses were the only ones you really had to study- that the rest followed an easy to learn pattern. And that the compound verbs were dead easy once you learned to conjugate haber.

I still have a hard time with the subjunctive, which is used a lot in Spanish, and which I don't quite understand when to use.

One reason a lot of gringos have a hard time learning Spanish or other languages is that they don't understand grammar in English, either. While children can easily learn another language quite quickly simply through immersion, I think it's easier as an adult to learn if you at least know what a past participle, or conditional tense means in English.

I taught myself Spanish (which is still far from fluent) by playing out in my head what I needed to do or buy, and writing out sentences, with the correct verb conjugations, using my 501 Spanish Verbs book and a good Spanish-English dictionary. Because I then went into a store or dealt with a tradesman using those sentences, rather than rote learning, I retained them, and speaking properly became easier and easier.

[Edited on 6-25-2023 by surabi]

[Edited on 6-25-2023 by surabi]
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pacificobob
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[*] posted on 6-25-2023 at 10:09 AM


Are you saying he lacks familiarity with the pluperfect subjunctive ?
I'm neither shocked or surprised.
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[*] posted on 6-25-2023 at 10:12 AM


Let's ask ChatGPT the same thing: "What is the difference between the Spanish words 'vamos' and 'vamonos'?"

Its answer:

The Spanish words "vamos" and "vámonos" are both forms of the verb "ir," which means "to go." However, they have slightly different meanings and are used in different contexts.

1. "Vamos": It is the first-person plural present tense of the verb "ir." It translates to "we go" or "let's go" in English. This form is commonly used to express an invitation or suggestion to go somewhere together. For example:
- ¿Vamos al cine? (Let's go to the cinema?)
- Vamos de paseo al parque. (We're going for a walk in the park.)

2. "Vámonos": It is a reflexive form of "vamos" and is derived from the pronoun "nosotros" (we) plus the reflexive pronoun "nos" (ourselves). It translates to "let's go" or "let's get going" in English. "Vámonos" is often used to express a sense of urgency or to encourage someone to start moving. For example:
- ¡Vámonos! ¡Ya estamos tarde! (Let's go! We're already late!)
- Es hora de irnos. (It's time for us to go.)

In summary, "vamos" is the standard form used to suggest or invite others to go somewhere together, while "vámonos" is a reflexive form that conveys a sense of urgency or prompts immediate action. Both expressions are commonly used in different situations, and their usage depends on the context and the intended meaning.
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surabi
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[*] posted on 6-25-2023 at 01:49 PM


Quote: Originally posted by pacificobob  
Are you saying he lacks familiarity with the pluperfect subjunctive ?
I'm neither shocked or surprised.


Hey, I'd have to look that one up, too.:yes: But I would understand the explanation.

I have found that a lot of gringos who don't understand grammar definitions really have zero interest in learning about it. They dismiss it out of hand as something irrelevant. They say things like "Oh, I can make myself understood well enough for what I need to do." They have the same attitude about the faulty grammar they use in English. They don't care. They'll continue to say "I have wrote" forever, even after it being pointed out to them that it's "I have written". For some reason I can't fathom, sounding illiterate doesn't bother them. Which is fine, but they seem to be under the impression that no one else will notice or form an impression of them that they are poorly educated.

As an Airbnb host, I see posts all the time on forums from people who want to be hired as co-hosts, saying they can deal with all guest communication, help write up a listing description, etc. But their post is littered with spelling and grammar errors, and idioms like "y'all". Why would you hire someone to do that kind of business work for you who can't write properly?

[Edited on 6-25-2023 by surabi]
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[*] posted on 6-25-2023 at 01:54 PM


Just use an interpreter and you'll be fine. All my friends speak English and Spanish. It makes getting around Baja easier.

For everything else,just need to know the basic words and have your phone handy in a pinch.








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surabi
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[*] posted on 6-25-2023 at 02:00 PM


Quote: Originally posted by JZ  
Just use an interpreter and you'll be fine. All my friends speak English and Spanish. It makes getting around Baja easier.

For everything else,just need to know the basic words and have your phone handy in a pinch.






This section of the forum is for those who are actually interested in learning Spanish, rather than suggestions for avoiding having to do so.

[Edited on 6-25-2023 by surabi]
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